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Journal ArticleDOI

Facebook eWOM: Self-Shared Versus System-Generated Credibility Cue

01 Jun 2019-Journal of Online Marketing (IGI Global)-Vol. 9, Iss: 3, pp 23-48
TL;DR: The structural model results confirm that the perceived source and message credibility derived from self-shared and system-generated cues are significant antecedents to purchase-related consideration for a brand.

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Abstract: The study examines how consumers, in a Facebook eWOM context, perceived source and message credibility by utilizing self-shared and system-generated cues. It investigates:(1) to what extent source and message credibility derived from these cues may lead to significant attitudinal responses and intentions to purchase; (2) and to what extent attitudinal responses are likely to vary with different levels and combinations of these credibility cues. Data was collected from 246 respondents who were exposed to Facebook eWOM scenarios. The structural model results confirm that the perceived source and message credibility derived from self-shared and system-generated cues are significant antecedents to purchase-related consideration for a brand. The results further confirm that these cues have an overall balancing effect: one compensates for the low level of the other leading to a significant persuasive response. The study evaluates traditional antecedents of WOM adoption, namely, perceived source and message credibility derived from unique interface-related features.

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Topics: Credibility (62%)
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Journal ArticleDOI
Joseph B. Walther1Institutions (1)
Abstract: While computer-mediated communication use and research are proliferating rapidly, findings offer contrasting images regarding the interpersonal character of this technology. Research trends over the history of these media are reviewed with observations across trends suggested so as to provide integrative principles with which to apply media to different circumstances. First, the notion that the media reduce personal influences—their impersonal effects—is reviewed. Newer theories and research are noted explaining normative “interpersonal” uses of the media. From this vantage point, recognizing that impersonal communication is sometimes advantageous, strategies for the intentional depersonalization of media use are inferred, with implications for Group Decision Support Systems effects. Additionally, recognizing that media sometimes facilitate communication that surpasses normal interpersonal levels, a new perspective on “hyperpersonal” communication is introduced. Subprocesses are discussed pertaining to re...

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4,209 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Carl I. Hovland1, Walter Weiss1Institutions (1)

2,295 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
28 Mar 2011-
TL;DR: There are measurable differences in the way messages propagate, that can be used to classify them automatically as credible or not credible, with precision and recall in the range of 70% to 80%.

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Abstract: We analyze the information credibility of news propagated through Twitter, a popular microblogging service. Previous research has shown that most of the messages posted on Twitter are truthful, but the service is also used to spread misinformation and false rumors, often unintentionally.On this paper we focus on automatic methods for assessing the credibility of a given set of tweets. Specifically, we analyze microblog postings related to "trending" topics, and classify them as credible or not credible, based on features extracted from them. We use features from users' posting and re-posting ("re-tweeting") behavior, from the text of the posts, and from citations to external sources.We evaluate our methods using a significant number of human assessments about the credibility of items on a recent sample of Twitter postings. Our results shows that there are measurable differences in the way messages propagate, that can be used to classify them automatically as credible or not credible, with precision and recall in the range of 70% to 80%.

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1,768 citations


Posted Content
Susan M. Mudambi1, David Schuff1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: Drawing on the paradigm of search and experience goods from information economics, a model of customer review helpfulness is developed and tested and indicates that review extremity, review depth, and product type affect the perceived helpfulness of the review.

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Abstract: Customer reviews are increasingly available online for a wide range of products and services. They supplement other information provided by electronic storefronts such as product descriptions, reviews from experts, and personalized advice generated by automated recommendation systems. While researchers have demonstrated the benefits of the presence of customer reviews to an online retailer, a largely uninvestigated issue is what makes customer reviews helpful to a consumer in the process of making a purchase decision. Drawing on the paradigm of search and experience goods from information economics, we develop and test a model of customer review helpfulness. An analysis of 1,587 reviews from Amazon.com across six products indicated that review extremity, review depth, and product type affect the perceived helpfulness of the review. Product type moderates the effect of review extremity on the helpfulness of the review. For experience goods, reviews with extreme ratings are less helpful than reviews with moderate ratings. For both product types, review depth has a positive effect on the helpfulness of the review, but the product type moderates the effect of review depth on the helpfulness of the review. Review depth has a greater positive effect on the helpfulness of the review for search goods than for experience goods. We discuss the implications of our findings for both theory and practice.

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1,745 citations


Posted Content
Abstract: Word of mouth marketing — the intentional influencing of consumer-to-consumer communications — is an increasingly important technique. The authors overview and synthesize extant word of mouth theory and present a study of a marketing campaign in which mobile phones were seeded with prominent bloggers. Eighty-three blogs were followed for six months. Findings reveal the complex cultural conditions through which marketing “hype” is transformed by consumers into the “honey” of relevant, shared communications. Four word of mouth communication strategies are identified — evaluation, embracing, endorsement and explanation. Each is influenced by communicator narrative, communications forum, communal norms and the nature of the marketing promotion. An intrinsic tension between commercial and communal interests plays a prominent, normative role in message formation and reception. This “hype-to-honey” theory shows that communal word of mouth does not simply increase or amplify marketing messages. Rather, marketing messages and meanings are systematically altered in the process of embedding them. The theory has implications for how marketers should plan, target and benefit from word of mouth and how scholars should understand word of mouth in a networked world.

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1,415 citations