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Journal ArticleDOI

Factors affecting the psychomotor vigilance of nurses working night shift

22 May 2023-International Nursing Review (International Nursing Review)-
TL;DR: In this paper , a descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 83 nurses who were working in a private hospital in Istanbul and voluntarily participated in this study between April 25 and May 30, 2022.
Abstract: Shifts and long working hours decrease the psychomotor vigilance of healthcare workers especially when working night shifts. Working night shifts adversely affects nurses' health and impacts patient safety.The purpose of this study is to identify factors affecting the psychomotor vigilance of nurses working night shift.This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 83 nurses who were working in a private hospital in Istanbul and voluntarily participated in this study between April 25 and May 30, 2022. Data were collected using "Descriptive Characteristics Form," "Psychomotor Vigilance Task," "Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index," and "Epworth Sleepiness Scale." The "STROBE checklist" for cross-sectional studies was utilized in order to report the findings of the study.When time-dependent variation of the nurses' psychomotor vigilance task performances on the night shift was examined, it was observed that the nurses' mean reaction time and number of lapses increased at the end of the night shift. Age, smoking, physical activity, daily water consumption, daytime sleepiness, and sleep quality were found as the factors affecting nurses' psychomotor vigilance.The psychomotor vigilance task performances of nurses working night shift are affected by age and a variety of behavioral factors.Suggestions for nursing policy include the implementation of workplace health promotion programs in order to increase the attention level of nurses in order to ensure employee and patient health and safety and create a healthy working environment.
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Journal ArticleDOI
Murray W. Johns1
01 Nov 1991-Sleep
TL;DR: The development and use of a new scale, the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), is described, which is a simple, self-administered questionnaire which is shown to provide a measurement of the subject's general level of daytime sleepiness.
Abstract: The development and use of a new scale, the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), is described. This is a simple, self-administered questionnaire which is shown to provide a measurement of the subject's general level of daytime sleepiness. One hundred and eighty adults answered the ESS, including 30 normal men and women as controls and 150 patients with a range of sleep disorders. They rated the chances that they would doze off or fall asleep when in eight different situations commonly encountered in daily life. Total ESS scores significantly distinguished normal subjects from patients in various diagnostic groups including obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia. ESS scores were significantly correlated with sleep latency measured during the multiple sleep latency test and during overnight polysomnography. In patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome ESS scores were significantly correlated with the respiratory disturbance index and the minimum SaO2 recorded overnight. ESS scores of patients who simply snored did not differ from controls.

13,788 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: PVT-B tracked standard 10-min PVT performance throughout both TSD and PSD, and yielded medium to large effect sizes, and may be a useful tool for assessing behavioral alertness in settings where the duration of the 10-minute PVT is considered impractical, although further validation in applied settings is needed.

293 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This is the first meta-analysis to investigate the pooled effects of shift work on the risk of poor mental health, including subanalyses by type ofpoor mental health and gender, and to assess whether these differ in men and women.
Abstract: Background. Shift work is characterized by employees working outside the standard hours of 7:00 am to 6:00 pm. Because shift work includes night work, the normal sleep-wake cycle (circadian rhythm) is disrupted, with potential consequences for shift workers' physical and mental health.Objectives. To assess the pooled effects of shift work on mental health and to evaluate whether these differ in men and women.Search Methods. We searched PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases for peer-reviewed or government reports published up to August 2018Selection Criteria. To be included, studies had to be longitudinal or case-control studies of shift work exposure associated with adverse mental health outcomes. For subanalyses, we grouped these outcomes as anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, or general poor mental health symptoms.Data Collection and Analysis. We followed the Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Group guidelines. We extracted adjusted risk estimates for each study to calculate pooled effect sizes (ESs) using random effect models and metaregression analysis to explore sources of heterogeneity.Main Results. We included 7 longitudinal studies, with 28 431 unique participants. Shift work was associated with increased overall risk of adverse mental health outcomes combined (ES = 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02, 1.62; I2 = 70.6%) and specifically for depressive symptoms (ES = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.74; I2 = 31.5%). Gender differences explained more than 90% of heterogeneity, with female shift workers more likely to experience depressive symptoms than female non-shift workers (odds ratio = 1.73; 95% CI = 1.39, 2.14).Authors' Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first meta-analysis to investigate the pooled effects of shift work on the risk of poor mental health, including subanalyses by type of poor mental health and gender. Shift workers, particularly women, are at increased risk for poor mental health, particularly depressive symptoms.Public Health Implications. Depression accounts for 4.3% of the global burden of disease and incidence, with mental disorders worldwide predicted to cost US $16.3 million by 2030. With 1 in 5 people in the United States and Europe doing shift work, and the increased risk of poor mental health among shift workers, shift work industries are a priority context for reducing this burden. Workplace health promotion programs and policies are needed to minimize shift workers' risk of poor mental health.

141 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Older age, morning-type, circadian flexibility, being married or having children, increased caffeine intake, higher scores on neuroticism and lower on hardiness were related to a higher risk of sleep-related impairment in response to shift work, whereas physical activity was a protective factor.

125 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Improved occupational guidelines for fluid and electrolyte replacement during hot weather occupational activities should be developed to include recommendations for fluid consumption before, during, and after work.
Abstract: When performing physical work, sweat output often exceeds water intake, producing a body water deficit or dehydration. Specific to the work place, dehydration can adversely affect worker productivity, safety, and morale. Legislative bodies in North America such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) recommend replacing fluids frequently when exposed to heat stress, such as one cup (250 ml) every 20 minutes when working in warm environments. However, the majority of legislative guidelines provide vague guidance and none take into account the effects of work intensity, specific environments, or protective clothing. Improved occupational guidelines for fluid and electrolyte replacement during hot weather occupational activities should be developed to include recommendations for fluid consumption before, during, and after work.

106 citations

Trending Questions (2)
Are nurses who work night shifts more likely to make medication errors or have more accidents?

The provided paper does not specifically mention medication errors or accidents related to nurses working night shifts.

Does night shift work affect nurses self-monitoring ability?

Night shift work affects nurses' psychomotor vigilance, which includes self-monitoring ability.