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Factors and Reasons Behind Disappearance of Arab Women in Arabic Literature From the Classical Era to the Modern One

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TLDR
In this paper, the authors discuss the reasons and the factors that mainly led to Arab women diminution in Arabic literature, such as the tribal conflicts, Umayyad caliphate and its battle against Abbasids caliphate after death of Muhammad, marrying women for pleasure and treating them as a sexual tool.
Abstract
This article is about the reasons and the factors that mainly led to many terrible effects on Arab women diminution in Arabic literature, such as the tribal conflicts, Umayyad caliphate and its battle against Abbasids caliphate after death of Muhammad, marrying women for pleasure and treating them as a sexual tool, in the Arabian Peninsula beginning from the pre- Islamic era to the modern era of Arabic literature. Furthermore, it also clarifies many women situations during those eras and their participations in many different events in battles by healing the injured people, helping their husbands in order to stop Muhammad’s teachings and his tradition regardless paying attention to pursue education and learn poetry due these chippy reasons, resulting in many bad education and increasing level of analphabetism quickly in addition to their situations during the great engagement which happened between Umayyad dynasty and Abassids dynasty. It also elucidates how technology and revolution of information in the twentieth century, as well as after the second world war, led to many great results on Arab women’s appearance, lately, especially in Saudi Arabia in media, press, drama, journalism and their involutions on developing Arabic literature including all its literary forms as well as their contributions of children literature appearance during the twentieth century.

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Review of Radwa Ashour et al (eds.), Arab Women Writers: A Critical Reference Guide, 1873-1999

Marle Hammond
TL;DR: In this paper, Molinaro discusses the evolution, if any, of the concept of status quo since the end of Ottoman rule and into the British Mandate, and points out that the lack of a formal list of Holy Places is a major issue and an accurate legal-historical context is necessary in order to identify the nature and authority of the various claims made by the different religious communities in Jerusalem.
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A Review of Foreign Language Learners’ Emotions

Qi-zhi Yu
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The Impact of Quality Dimensions of Accounting Information System Success on the Effectiveness of During-Financial Crisis Management: The Mediating Role of System Usage in a Government Sector Context

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References
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OtherDOI

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Review of Radwa Ashour et al (eds.), Arab Women Writers: A Critical Reference Guide, 1873-1999

Marle Hammond
TL;DR: In this paper, Molinaro discusses the evolution, if any, of the concept of status quo since the end of Ottoman rule and into the British Mandate, and points out that the lack of a formal list of Holy Places is a major issue and an accurate legal-historical context is necessary in order to identify the nature and authority of the various claims made by the different religious communities in Jerusalem.
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