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Journal ArticleDOI

Fake-love: brand love for counterfeits

08 Jun 2018-Marketing Intelligence & Planning (Emerald Publishing Limited)-Vol. 36, Iss: 6, pp 661-677

AbstractRecent studies have indicated that consumers who knowingly purchase counterfeits could be in love with the brands whose counterfeits they own. Arguably, this love may not be the same as the love felt by individuals who purchase the original brand. Research in this field has not studied how these two love types differ in its genesis and consequences. Therefore, the paper aims to discuss this issue and intends to fill this gap.,This study performed a multi-group analysis using (PLS-SEM) between two groups of customers (real-buyers and fake-buyers) to elucidate the factors that separate fake-love from real-love. This study adopted a combination of convenience sampling and field visits to identify 500 individuals who were classified as either real-buyers or fake-buyers.,The relationship between social-self and brand love is significantly stronger for fake-buyers as compared to real-buyers. However, the relationship between inner-self and brand love is significantly stronger in the case of real-buyers as compared to fake-buyers. Real-buyers tend to be more brand resilient than fake-buyers as their love emanates primarily from the inner-self. Additionally, fake-buyers indulge in +WOM more than real-buyers as their brand love emanates from the social-self.,This is the first study to explore the concept of brand love among consumers who purchase counterfeits in spite of being able to afford the original brands. This is also the first study that is focused on identifying the antecedents and outcomes that separate real-love from fake-love.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Brand love is a phenomenon that is experienced by a group of satisfied consumers. The construct brand love is of great importance to academics and practitioners because a group of satisfied custome...

20 citations


Cites background from "Fake-love: brand love for counterfe..."

  • ...…(2011), Roy et al. (2013), Padma and Wagenseil (2018) Self-esteem Sarkar and Sreejesh (2014) Consumer Self-expressiveness Sarkar and Sreejesh (2014), Khandeparkar and Motiani (2018) Purchase Intention Sarkar and Sreejesh (2014), Fetscherin (2014), Pinto Borges et al. (2016) Brand Jealousy Sarkar…...

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  • ...…Loureiro and Kaufmann (2012), Wallace et al. (2017), Kwon and Mattila (2015), Roy et al. (2016), Ismail and Melewar (2015), Bıçakcıo glu et al. (2018), Khandeparkar and Motiani (2018), Pinto Borges et al. (2016), Liu et al. (2018) High Quality Perceptions Batra et al. (2012), Rauschnabel and…...

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  • ...Key Variables Papers Brand Advocacy Parrott et al. (2015) Involvement Parrott et al. (2015) Self-brand Connection Kwon and Mattila (2015) Symbolic Incongruity Hegner et al. (2017) Ideological Incompatability Hegner et al. (2017) Brand Avoidance Hegner et al. (2017) Brand Retaliation Hegner et al. (2017) Impulse Buying Sarkar (2014) Nostalgic Brand Experience Sarkar (2014) Sincerity Personality Dimension Roy et al. (2016) Excitement Personality Dimension Roy et al. (2016) Affective Consumer Brand Relationship Leung et al. (2014) Utilitarian Consumer Brand Relationship Leung et al. (2014) Brand Equity Leung et al. (2014) Brand Identity Alnawas and Altarifi (2016) Brand Lifestyle Similarity Alnawas and Altarifi (2016) Foreign Collaboration Sarkar et al. (2016) Perceived Brand Ethicality Sarkar et al. (2016) Other Customer Perception Sarkar et al. (2016), Sreejesh et al. (2018) Safe Haven Sarkar et al. (2016) Idol Attachment Huang et al. (2015) Physical Vanity Traits Huang et al. (2015) Variety Seeking Huang et al. (2015) Peer Norms Huang et al. (2015) Fashion Impulse tendency Liapati et al. (2015) Browsing Liapati et al. (2015) Shopping Enjoyment Liapati et al. (2015) Positive Affect Liapati et al. (2015) Urge to Purchase Liapati et al. (2015) Available Budget Liapati et al. (2015) Ethical Judgement Dalman et al. (2017) Sin of Omission Dalman et al. (2017) Brand Defense Dalman et al. (2017) Perceived Betrayal Thakur et al. (2018) Desire for Revenge Thakur et al. (2018) Reward Thakur et al. (2018) Respect Garg et al. (2016) Brand’s Liking for Consumers Garg et al. (2016) Extroversion Brand Personality Garg et al. (2016) Neuroticism Garg et al. (2016) Affective Commitment Garg et al. (2016), Garg et al. (2015) Consumer Citizenship Behavior Garg et al. (2016), Garg et al. (2015) Brand Authenticity Manthiou et al. (2018) Impression in Memory Manthiou et al. (2018) Lifestyle Congruence Manthiou et al. (2018) Perceived Strength of Brand Origin Siew et al. (2018) Brand Credibility Bairrada et al. (2018) Brand Innovativeness Bairrada et al. (2018) Repurchase Intention Garg et al. (2015) Brand Resilience Khandeparkar and Motiani (2018) Brand Engagement Pinto Borges et al. (2016) Overall Attitude Valence Pinto Borges et al. (2016) Novelty Perception Liu et al. (2018) Brand Addiction Cui et al. (2018) Service Leadership Padma and Wagenseil (2018) Service Culture Padma and Wagenseil (2018) Service Brand Image Padma and Wagenseil (2018) Favorable Service Encounters Padma and Wagenseil (2018) Retail Service Encounters Padma and Wagenseil (2018) Employee Pride Padma and Wagenseil (2018) Employee Loyalty Padma and Wagenseil (2018) Customer Commitment Padma and Wagenseil (2018)...

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  • ...…(2018) Brand Credibility Bairrada et al. (2018) Brand Innovativeness Bairrada et al. (2018) Repurchase Intention Garg et al. (2015) Brand Resilience Khandeparkar and Motiani (2018) Brand Engagement Pinto Borges et al. (2016) Overall Attitude Valence Pinto Borges et al. (2016) Novelty Perception…...

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  • ...Khandeparkar and Motiani (2018) also studied brand love for counterfeits and found that the equation between social-self and brand love is strong for fake buyers while real buyers are more resilient when compared to fake buyers....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to introduce and test a new emoji-based metric that could be used to monitor consumers’ emotions toward brands on social media.,To test this new metric, 720 consumer tweets were retrieved from official Twitter accounts of 18 leading global brands representing 6 product categories/markets. In order to check its validity, the emoji-based metric was correlated with two measures: the percentage of positive emojis from Brandwatch’s (2018) Emoji Report and the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) for 2017.,The findings of this paper indicate that consumers tend to use more (vs less) positive emojis when expressing their feelings toward Coca-Cola (vs Taco Bell). They also show that the new metric is highly and positively associated with the ACSI, hence supporting its validity.,The new metric is only applicable to brands that have a social media presence.,The proposed metric is easy to implement and interpret by almost every researcher and manager.,While all extant brand sentiment analyses focus on analyzing the words in brand-related user-generated content, this paper considers an alternative source of information about emotions, that is, emojis. Beyond being valid, the proposed emoji-based metric is unique, easy to implement and interpret, and generalizable.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine customer attitudes toward purchasing counterfeit luxury products (ATPCLP) in two cities in two different countries (Saudi Arabia and Malaysia) by testing the relationships between the various reasons for purchasing those products: social status insecurity, status consumption and value consciousness.,Questionnaires were distributed conveniently to urban customers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Altogether 658 useable questionnaires were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics, general linear model of univariate analysis of variance and structural equation modeling.,Quality, price, popularity and status signaling represent the main motivating factors for their brand choices of counterfeit luxury products among the two country groups of customers. As expected, customers' social status insecurity influences their ATPCLP, but not their status consumption. However, status consumption does positively moderates the relationship of their social status insecurity and their ATPCLP. Furthermore, customers' value consciousness influences their ATPCLP and moderates the relationship between status consumption and ATPCLP. The impact of status consumption on ATPCLP depends on the importance one places on the value of the products. However, the authors found no differences in social status insecurity, status consumption and value consciousness, on their ATPCLP among the customers. Some implications and limitations of the results are discussed.,The use of convenience sampling and mainly college students (in Saudi Arabia) as respondents represent the main limitations of this study.,The practical implication of this study is to discourage the purchasing of counterfeit luxury products in their respective country Malaysian marketers need to stress that their genuine products are of top quality while Saudi marketers need to stress that their genuine products are of well-known brands that are sourced from well-known countries of origin. Besides, Malaysian marketers need to offer genuine products that are not overly priced or ones that indicate value-for-money while Saudi marketers need to convey the message that their genuine products could help enhance or uplift their customers' social status. In this study, the authors did not find any support for differences in ATPCLP between the two rather different Muslim-majority countries. This could be due to the fact that the majority of the respondents were females in their mid-20s and that both countries have a growing number of young customer base, which makes them particularly attractive target customers for branded/luxury products and, at the same time, easy preys to luxury products counterfeiters. This implies that there are still more opportunities for academics to study the topic or related topics in the future.,As far as the authors know, no one has undertaken a comparative study involving two very different Islamic majority countries (more conservative mono-cultural and mono-ethnicity Saudi Arabia versus less conservative multicultural and multi-ethnicity Malaysia) before.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
22 Jun 2020
TL;DR: This article intends to use text analysis technique to provide the reader with a summary of the existing academic literature on counterfeiting and counterfeit product-related literature by providing a brief (yet ample) list on counterfeit(ing).
Abstract: Though addressed widely by academicians and researchers across the globe, the subject of counterfeiting dates back to historical times of 27BC. In academic literature, the discussion on counterfeit(ing) began a century back when researchers started to define its boundaries through their understanding. Ranging from the classical descriptions on counterfeit, counterfeiting, counterfeit trade and counterfeit product(s), this article intends to use text analysis technique to provide the reader with a summary of the existing academic literature on the aforementioned subjects. It summarizes key definitions from the respective area with a broader aim to bridge the gap in the existing counterfeiting and counterfeit product-related literature by providing a brief (yet ample) list on counterfeit(ing). Moreover, it also identifies the key similarities exiting in the definition set. The article concludes with authors own definition of counterfeiting and counterfeit product(s) based on the conceptualization developed through the understanding of combined definitions from the literature.

4 citations


Cites background from "Fake-love: brand love for counterfe..."

  • ...Khandeparkar and Motiani (2018) “Counterfeits are exact replicas manage to deceive consumers into believing that they are real....

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  • ...Khandeparkar and Motiani (2018) “Counterfeits are exact replicas manage to deceive consumers into believing that they are real.” 30. Liu, Dalton, and Hong (2018) “Counterfeits products are the fake replicas that cost significantly less than the genuine ones and use a brand name or logo without the owner’s authorization....

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  • ...Khandeparkar and Motiani (2018) “Counterfeits are exact replicas manage to deceive consumers into believing that they are real.”...

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