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Book ChapterDOI

Family influence and STEM career aspirations

01 Jan 2023-pp 370-381
TL;DR: The role of science capital and family science habitus on the development of STEM interests is described in this article , followed by a discussion of how parents, early childhood experiences, gender, and minoritization affect the STEM interests and career aspirations of children.
Abstract: The aim of this chapter is to discuss current research examining family influences on the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) interests and career aspirations of their children. The role of science capital and family science habitus on the development of STEM interests is described. This is followed by a discussion of how parents, early childhood experiences, gender, and minoritization affect the STEM interests and career aspirations of children. The chapter concludes with current theoretical frameworks, models, and validated instruments that are used to assess family influences on STEM interests and aspirations.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors identify five general profiles of childhood participation in ISLEs from data reported by a nationally representative sample of college students (N = 15,579) using latent class analysis.
Abstract: Informal STEM learning experiences (ISLEs), such as participating in science, computing, and engineering clubs and camps, have been associated with the development of youth's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics interests and career aspirations. However, research on ISLEs predominantly focuses on institutional settings such as museums and science centers, which are often discursively inaccessible to youth who identify with minoritized demographic groups. Using latent class analysis, we identify five general profiles (i.e., classes) of childhood participation in ISLEs from data reported by a nationally representative sample of college students (N = 15,579). Results show that childhood participation in specific typologies of ISLEs (i.e., setting and activity type) is associated with youth's disciplinary interests at the end of high school. Participation in outdoor activities that invite observation is more often reported by female respondents and is negatively associated with interest in computing and mathematics. Participation in indoor activities that invite object manipulation is more often reported by male respondents and is positively associated with interest in computing and engineering. However, frequent participation in multiple ISLEs is positively associated with interest in "science." These results elucidate stereotypical discourses that reinforce the exclusion of minoritized students and expose critical areas needing reform.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an integrative theoretical framework to explain and predict psychological changes achieved by different modes of treatment, including enactive, vicarious, exhortative, and emotive sources.

16,833 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a social cognitive framework for understanding three intricately linked aspects of career development: (a) the formation and elaboration of career-relevant interests, (b) selection of academic and career choice options, and (c) performance and persistence in educational and occupational pursuits.

5,709 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors conceptualized community cultural wealth as a critical race theory (CRT) challenge to traditional interpretations of cultural capital, shifting the research lens away from a deficit view of Communities of Color as places full of cultural poverty disadvantages, and instead focusing on and learns from the array of cultural knowledge, skills, abilities and contacts possessed by socially marginalized groups that often go unrecognized and unacknowledged.
Abstract: This article conceptualizes community cultural wealth as a critical race theory (CRT) challenge to traditional interpretations of cultural capital. CRT shifts the research lens away from a deficit view of Communities of Color as places full of cultural poverty disadvantages, and instead focuses on and learns from the array of cultural knowledge, skills, abilities and contacts possessed by socially marginalized groups that often go unrecognized and unacknowledged. Various forms of capital nurtured through cultural wealth include aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial and resistant capital. These forms of capital draw on the knowledges Students of Color bring with them from their homes and communities into the classroom. This CRT approach to education involves a commitment to develop schools that acknowledge the multiple strengths of Communities of Color in order to serve a larger purpose of struggle toward social and racial justice.

4,897 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that self-efficacy acts as an active precursor of self-concept development and suggest that selfconcept research separate out its multiple components and subprocesses and invest more effort toward making students less preoccupied with normative ability comparisons in school.
Abstract: Academic motivation researchers sometimes struggle to decipher the distinctive characteristics of what appear to be highly analogous constructs. In this article, we discuss important similarities between self-concept and self-efficacy as well as some notable differences. Both constructs share many similarities such as centrality of perceived competence in construct definition; use of mastery experience, social comparison, and reflected appraisals as major information sources; and a domain-specific and multidimensional nature. Both predict motivation, emotion, and performance to varying degrees. However, there are also important differences. These differences include integration vs. separation of cognition and affect, heavily normative vs. goal-referenced evaluation of competence, aggregated vs. context-specific judgment, hierarchical vs. loosely hierarchical structure, past vs. future orientation, and relative temporal stability vs. malleability. We argue that self-efficacy acts as an active precursor of self-concept development and suggest that self-concept research separate out its multiple components and subprocesses and invest more effort toward making students less preoccupied with normative ability comparisons in school.

1,796 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors found that female and higher-SES students are more likely to participate in cultural activities and that cultural capital has a positive, significant effect on the grades of female students, both with and without controlling for Bourdieu's notion of habitus.
Abstract: Studies of the effects of cultural capital on the educational success of male and female students have reached coLtiadictory concusions, and few studies have considered the role that habitus plays in educational outcomes. This article analyzes the cultural participation of eighth-grade boys and girls and presents a model that includes a measure for habitus. Through a detailed analysis of cultural practices that have typically been grouped together as a single scale, the author found that female and higher-SES students are more likely to participate in cultural activities. In addition, in both standard ordinary least squares and fixed school-effects models, she found that cultural capital has a positive, significant effect on the grades of female students, both with and without controlling for Bourdieu's notion of habitus. For male students, the effect is weaker and present only in the fixed-effects models. Habitus itself has a strong effect for both male and female students in all models. The author argues that traditional gender stereotypes play a role in the lack of cultural participation by male students and that female students may be more encouraged to make use of their cultural capital to succeed in school.

921 citations

Trending Questions (3)
How do familial influences shape a child's career aspirations?

Family influences, such as science capital, habits, parental involvement, early experiences, gender, and minoritization, significantly impact a child's STEM interests and career aspirations according to research discussed.

How Family Relationships Affect Career Ambitions?

Family relationships influence STEM career aspirations through science capital, family science habitus, parental influence, early experiences, gender, and minoritization, as discussed in the research.

How does the family influence the career choices among STEM students?

Family influences STEM career aspirations through science capital, family science habitus, parental involvement, early experiences, gender, and minoritization. Various theoretical frameworks and instruments assess these impacts.