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Journal ArticleDOI

Farmers Willingness to Participate In Voluntary Land Consolidation in Gozamin District, Ethiopia

12 Oct 2019-Land (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)-Vol. 8, Iss: 10, pp 148
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the determinants influencing the willingness of landholder farmers to participate in voluntary land consolidation processes and found that land consolidation is a proper tool to solve inefficiencies in agricultural production, as it enables consolidating plots based on the consent of landholders.
Abstract: In many African countries and especially in the highlands of Ethiopia—the investigation site of this paper—agricultural land is highly fragmented. Small and scattered parcels impede a necessary increase in agricultural efficiency. Land consolidation is a proper tool to solve inefficiencies in agricultural production, as it enables consolidating plots based on the consent of landholders. Its major benefits are that individual farms get larger, more compact, contiguous parcels, resulting in lower cultivation efforts. This paper investigates the determinants influencing the willingness of landholder farmers to participate in voluntary land consolidation processes. The study was conducted in Gozamin District, Amhara Region, Ethiopia. The study was mainly based on survey data collected from 343 randomly selected landholder farmers. In addition, structured interviews and focus group discussions with farmers were held. The collected data were analyzed quantitatively mainly by using a logistic regression model and qualitatively by using focus group discussions and expert panels. According to the results, landholder farmers are predominantly willing to participate in voluntary land consolidation (66.8%), while a substantive fraction of farmers express unease with voluntary land consolidation. The study highlighted the following four determinants to be significant in influencing the willingness of farmers for voluntary land consolidation: (1) the exchange should preferably happen with parcels of neighbors, (2) land consolidation should lead to better arranged parcels, (3) nearness of plots to the farmstead, and (4) an expected improvement in productivity. Interestingly, the majority of farmers believes that land consolidation could reduce land use conflicts. The study provides evidence that policymakers should consider these socio-economic, legal, cultural, infrastructural, and land-related factors when designing and implementing voluntary land consolidation policies and programs.
Citations
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01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The demand for land consolidation arises from a similar source in all countries: the need for readjusting unfavourable land division and promoting the appropriate use of the real property without changing the status of ownership as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Rural development by land consolidation is used in several countries in the Continent of Europe. At the moment, land consolidation projects are executed broadly in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, as well as in Finland, Norway and Sweden. The demand for land consolidation arises from a similar source in all countries: the need for readjusting unfavourable land division and promoting the appropriate use of the real property without changing the status of ownership.

83 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined how contemporary land consolidation activities in Sub-Saharan Africa contribute to the achievement of the SDGs, specifically ending poverty, ending hunger, and developing sustainable cities and settlements through land tenure security, food security, and rural development initiatives at country level.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
29 Jun 2020-Land
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provided a novel and holistic network perspective for unpacking the complex relationships among different stakeholders, and revealed the relatively weak status of residents, the pivotal role of the village committee, as well as the indispensable part of the township government, with the aim to provide targeted guidance and decision-making supports for strengthening interactions and cooperation among different stakeholder groups.
Abstract: Rural settlement consolidation (RSC) has a critical role in facilitating the transformation of human settlement and land use transition in the rural revitalization process RSC involves a diversity of stakeholder groups with complex and intertwined concerns It is therefore crucial to identify the key stakeholders and their main concerns to effectively align rural planning and policymaking However, this line of research remains underdeveloped This study provides a novel and holistic network perspective for unpacking the complex relationships among different stakeholders The results indicate: (1) the network of stakeholder concerns is relatively sparse, with 68 concern nodes and 159 concern ties; (2) The village committee, centralized residents, and contractors occupy the core position within the concerns network, while the local government has the majority of strongly connected nodes; (3) The lists of prominent concern nodes and ties are identified by different network indices, including the degree difference, the out-status centrality, closeness centrality, node betweenness centrality, and link betweenness centrality; (4) The main interaction type among stakeholder groups can be classified into five categories: financing, psychological attachment, stakeholder participation, project management, and the improvement in living conditions and infrastructure This study reveals the relatively weak status of residents, the pivotal role of the village committee, as well as the indispensable part of the contractor and township government, with the aim to provide targeted guidance and decision-making supports for strengthening interactions and cooperation among different stakeholder groups The findings shed new light on performing the multi-tasks of RSC and facilitating the sustainable management of rural areas

22 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
03 Aug 2020-Agronomy
TL;DR: In this paper, the food system of Nepal through the lens of the food-water, energy, and biodiversity (FWEB) nexus is reviewed to develop a more robust food system framework.
Abstract: Water, energy, and biodiversity are essential components for building a sustainable food system in a developing country like Nepal. Green Revolution technologies and the package of practices largely ignored the role of ecosystem services, leaving a large population of small farmers’ food- and nutrition-insecure. Biodiversity, especially, agrobiodiversity is in decline and this vital cross-cutting element is less discussed and interlinked in nexus literature. The interlinking food system with water–energy–biodiversity nexus, therefore, is essential to achieve a resilient food system. It ensures the vital structures and functions of the ecosystem on which it is dependent are well protected in the face of increasing socio-economic and climatic stress. This paper reviews the food system of Nepal through the lens of the food–water–energy–biodiversity (FWEB) nexus to develop a more robust food system framework. From this approach, food system foresight can benefit from different nature-based solutions such as agro-ecosystem-based adaptation and mitigation and climate-resilient agro-ecological production system. We found that the FWEB nexus-based approach is more relevant in the context of Nepal where food and nutrition insecurity prevails among almost half of the population. Improvement in the food system requires the building of synergy and complementary among the components of FWEB nexus. Hence, we proposed a modified framework of food system foresight for developing resilience in a food system, which can be achieved with an integrated and resilient nexus that gives more emphasis to agro-ecological system-based solutions to make the food system more climate resilient. This framework can be useful in addressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) numbers 1, 2, 3, 6, 13, and 15 and can also be used as a tool for food system planning based on a broader nexus.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors used the drivers, pressures, state, impact, responses (DPSIR) framework to quantify the land cover change and identify its major determinants by using the Satellite images of Landsat 5 (1986), Landsat 7 (2003), and Sentinel-2 (2018) and a supervised image classification methodology.
Abstract: Land cover patterns in sub-Saharan Africa are rapidly changing. This study aims to quantify the land cover change and to identify its major determinants by using the Drivers, Pressures, State, Impact, Responses (DPSIR) framework in the Ethiopian Gozamin District over a period of 32 years (1986 to 2018). Satellite images of Landsat 5 (1986), Landsat 7 (2003), and Sentinel-2 (2018) and a supervised image classification methodology were used to assess the dynamics of land cover change. Land cover maps of the three dates, focus group discussions (FGDs), interviews, and farmers’ lived experiences through a household survey were applied to identify the factors for changes based on the DPSIR framework. Results of the investigations revealed that during the last three decades the study area has undergone an extensive land cover change, primarily a shift from cropland and grassland into forests and built-up areas. Thus, quantitative land cover change detection between 1986 and 2018 revealed that cropland, grassland, and bare areas declined by 10.53%, 5.7%, and 2.49%. Forest, built-up, shrub/scattered vegetation, and water bodies expanded by 13.47%, 4.02%, 0.98%, and 0.25%. Household surveys and focus group discussions (FGDs) identified the population growth, the rural land tenure system, the overuse of land, the climate change, and the scarcity of grazing land as drivers of these land cover changes. Major impacts were rural to urban migration, population size change, scarcity of land, and decline in land productivity. The outputs from this study could be used to assure sustainability in resource utilization, proper land use planning, and proper decision-making by the concerned government authorities.

14 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1983
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of the use of truncated distributions in the context of unions and wages, and some results on truncated distribution Bibliography Index and references therein.
Abstract: Preface 1. Introduction 2. Discrete regression models 3. Probabilistic-choice models 4. Discriminant analysis 5. Multivariate qualitative variables 6. Censored and truncated regression models 7. Simultaneous-equations models with truncated and censored variables 8. Two-stage estimation methods 9. Models with self-selectivity 10. Disequilibrium models 11. Some applications: unions and wages Appendix: Some results on truncated distributions Bibliography Index.

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TL;DR: The Linear Probability Model Specification of Nonlinear Probability Models Estimation of Probit and Logit Models for Dichotomous Dependent Variables Minimum Chi-square Estimation and Polytomous Models Summary and Extensions.
Abstract: The Linear Probability Model Specification of Nonlinear Probability Models Estimation of Probit and Logit Models for Dichotomous Dependent Variables Minimum Chi-Square Estimation and Polytomous Models Summary and Extensions

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"Farmers Willingness to Participate ..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...Although LPM can be estimated by the standard ordinary least squares (OLS) method, the results can cause several problems [49]....

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  • ...According to Aldrich and Nelson [49], the binomial logistic regression distribution function can be specified as: pi = eZi 1 + eZi (5) where pi denotes the probability that the ith landholder farmer is willing to accept voluntary land consolidation....

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  • ...According to Aldrich and Nelson [49], the binomial logistic regression distribution function can be specified as:...

    [...]

01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The most important developments in econometrics in the past ten years have occurred in the area of qualitative response (QR) models as discussed by the authors, and there are two factors which explain the recent upsurge of QR models in economic applications: 1) Economists deal with many variables, thus necessitating the need to formulate more complex models involving more than one discrete variable and more than two responses, as well as using more independent variables.
Abstract: One of the most important developments in econometrics in the past ten years has occurred in the area of qualitative response (QR) models. There are two factors which explain the recent upsurge of QR models in economic applications: 1) Economists deal with many variables, thus necessitating the need to formulate more complex models involving more than one discrete variable and more than two responses, as well as using more independent variables. The estimation of such complex QR models has only recently been made possible by the development of advanced computer technology. 2) An increasingly large number of sample surveys have been recently conducted and their results made readily available on magnetic tapes. This paper will present the basic facts about QR models. It starts with the discussion of the simplest model - the model for a univariate dichotomous dependent variable, and then moves on to multi-response models. The following three problems are discussed: 1) how to specify a model which is consistent with economic theory and which is at the same time statistically manageable; 2) how to estimate and test hypotheses on the parameters of a model; and 3) what criteria to use for choosing among competing models.

1,995 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: The most important developments in econometrics in the past ten years have occurred in the area of qualitative response (QR) models as discussed by the authors, and there are two factors which explain the recent upsurge of QR models in economic applications: 1) Economists deal with many variables, thus necessitating the need to formulate more complex models involving more than one discrete variable and more than two responses, as well as using more independent variables.
Abstract: One of the most important developments in econometrics in the past ten years has occurred in the area of qualitative response (QR) models. There are two factors which explain the recent upsurge of QR models in economic applications: 1) Economists deal with many variables, thus necessitating the need to formulate more complex models involving more than one discrete variable and more than two responses, as well as using more independent variables. The estimation of such complex QR models has only recently been made possible by the development of advanced computer technology. 2) An increasingly large number of sample surveys have been recently conducted and their results made readily available on magnetic tapes. This paper will present the basic facts about QR models. It starts with the discussion of the simplest model - the model for a univariate dichotomous dependent variable, and then moves on to multi-response models. The following three problems are discussed: 1) how to specify a model which is consistent with economic theory and which is at the same time statistically manageable; 2) how to estimate and test hypotheses on the parameters of a model; and 3) what criteria to use for choosing among competing models.

1,971 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Based on experiences gained in the region and elsewhere, the authors finds the fragmentation of small landholdings and tiny land parcels detrimental to land conservation and economic gain, thereby discouraging farmers from adoption of agricultural innovations.

326 citations