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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/09243046.2020.1733308

Fatigue and impact strengths of kenaf fibre reinforced polypropylene composites: effects of fibre treatments

04 Mar 2021-Advanced Composite Materials (Taylor & Francis)-Vol. 30, Iss: 2, pp 103-115
Abstract: The effects of two fibre treatments (alkali-alone treatment and combined alkali-silane treatment) on the fatigue and impact strengths of kenaf fibre reinforced polypropylene composites are investig...

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Topics: Kenaf (55%)
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8 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/POLYM12051072
07 May 2020-Polymers
Abstract: Composite materials reinforced with biofibers and nanomaterials are becoming considerably popular, especially for their light weight, strength, exceptional stiffness, flexural rigidity, damping property, longevity, corrosion, biodegradability, antibacterial, and fire-resistant properties. Beside the traditional thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers, nanoparticles are also receiving attention in terms of their potential to improve the functionality and mechanical performances of biocomposites. These remarkable characteristics have made nanobiocomposite materials convenient to apply in aerospace, mechanical, construction, automotive, marine, medical, packaging, and furniture industries, through providing environmental sustainability. Nanoparticles (TiO2, carbon nanotube, rGO, ZnO, and SiO2) are easily compatible with other ingredients (matrix polymer and biofibers) and can thus form nanobiocomposites. Nanobiocomposites are exhibiting a higher market volume with the expansion of new technology and green approaches for utilizing biofibers. The performances of nanobiocomposites depend on the manufacturing processes, types of biofibers used, and the matrix polymer (resin). An overview of different natural fibers (vegetable/plants), nanomaterials, biocomposites, nanobiocomposites, and manufacturing methods are discussed in the context of potential application in this review.

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49 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/09243046.2020.1738635
Abstract: Internal pores in composite materials generated during fabrication processing can induce negative influences on the physical properties. Among them, the fatigue life under repetitive loadings is on...

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Topics: Fracture mechanics (57%), Porosity (50%)

3 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.MATPR.2020.11.452
Abstract: Multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) reinforced Polypropylene (PP) composites are fabricated by compression molding machine. Composites are prepared with 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 and 1.5 wt% of Multi wall carbon nanotube as nanofiller in polypropylene matrix. Mechanical and thermal behavior of composites is examined as per ASTM. Results shows improvement in mechanical and thermal properties due to addition of Multi wall carbon nanotube in Polypropylene matrix. Tensile strength was highest at 62.80% at 1.2 wt%. Impact strength and hardness is improved by 82.14% and 12.44% at 1.5 wt%. Glass transition temperature was increased at low wt. % and further decreases. The SEM images of composite implied that MWCNTs have dispersed uniform in Polypropylene (PP) matrix reasons for property enhancement. These composites find application in plastic products and furniture.

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Topics: Polypropylene (55%), Nanocomposite (55%), Carbon nanotube (54%) ... read more

2 Citations


Book ChapterDOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-821483-1.00021-8
01 Jan 2021-
Abstract: Composite emerged as a new material class that allows synergic combining of different materials’ properties to obtain enhancement in the desired property for an application. Among the available options to compose it, natural fibres have a significant advantages in terms of high specific properties (property to density ratio), which can be compared to glass fibres. Other advantages are the excellent availability of natural sources or residues. They have a low cost associated with their production and they are biodegradable, which gives the natural fibres composites a sustainability aspect. However, limitations in fibre’s thermal stability and chemical surface stability will influence their applications. The processing depends on each matrix that will be applied in the composite: ceramic or polymeric. The modification of the fibre surface to improve its interaction with the matrix will produce high-performance composites with applications in different industrial sectors such as automotive, aeronautics, construction, medicine and several others. This chapter aims to contextualize the scenario of natural fibres composites evaluating the development of technologies that allow the processing and the production of high-performance environment-friendly materials.

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1 Citations



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Open access
P Wambua1, Jan Ivens1, Ignaas Verpoest1Institutions (1)
01 Sep 2001-
Abstract: In this work, natural fibres (sisal, kenaf, hemp, jute and coir) reinforced polypropylene composites were processed by compression moulding using a film stacking method. The mechanical properties of the different natural fibre composites were tested and compared. A further comparison was made with the corresponding properties of glass mat reinforced polypropylene composites from the open literature. Kenaf, hemp and sisal composites showed comparable tensile strength and modulus results but in impact properties hemp appears to out-perform kenaf. The tensile modulus, impact strength and the ultimate tensile stress of kenaf reinforced polypropylene composites were found to increase with increasing fibre weight fraction. Coir fibre composites displayed the lowest mechanical properties, but their impact strength was higher than that of jute and kenaf composites. In most cases the specific properties of the natural fibre composites were found to compare favourably with those of glass.

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Topics: Kenaf (60%), Ultimate tensile strength (54%), SISAL (53%)

1,963 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0266-3538(03)00096-4
P Wambua1, Jan Ivens1, Ignaas Verpoest1Institutions (1)
Abstract: In this work, natural fibres (sisal, kenaf, hemp, jute and coir) reinforced polypropylene composites were processed by compression moulding using a film stacking method The mechanical properties of the different natural fibre composites were tested and compared A further comparison was made with the corresponding properties of glass mat reinforced polypropylene composites from the open literature Kenaf, hemp and sisal composites showed comparable tensile strength and modulus results but in impact properties hemp appears to out-perform kenaf The tensile modulus, impact strength and the ultimate tensile stress of kenaf reinforced polypropylene composites were found to increase with increasing fibre weight fraction Coir fibre composites displayed the lowest mechanical properties, but their impact strength was higher than that of jute and kenaf composites In most cases the specific properties of the natural fibre composites were found to compare favourably with those of glass

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Topics: Kenaf (60%), Ultimate tensile strength (54%), SISAL (53%) ... read more

1,955 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.COMPOSITESB.2012.04.053
Abstract: This paper provides a comprehensive overview on different surface treatments applied to natural fibres for advanced composites applications. In practice, the major drawbacks of using natural fibres are their high degree of moisture absorption and poor dimensional stability. The primary objective of surface treatments on natural fibres is to maximize the bonding strength so as the stress transferability in the composites. The overall mechanical properties of natural fibre reinforced polymer composites are highly dependent on the morphology, aspect ratio, hydrophilic tendency and dimensional stability of the fibres used. The effects of different chemical treatments on cellulosic fibres that are used as reinforcements for thermoset and thermoplastics are studied. The chemical sources for the treatments include alkali, silane, acetylation, benzoylation, acrylation and acrylonitrile grafting, maleated coupling agents, permanganate, peroxide, isocyanate, stearic acid, sodium chlorite, triazine, fatty acid derivate (oleoyl chloride) and fungal. The significance of chemically-treated natural fibres is seen through the improvement of mechanical strength and dimensional stability of resultant composites as compared with a pristine sample.

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887 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1163/156855401753255422
Abstract: A review of biocomposites highlighting recent studies and developments in natural fibers, bio-polymers, and various surface modifications of natural fibers to improve fiber-matrix adhesion is presented. One of the most important factors which determine the final performance of the composite materials is the quality of the fiber-matrix interface. A sufficient degree of adhesion between the surface of hydrophilic ligno-cellulosic natural fibers and the polymer matrix resin is usually desired to achieve optimum performance of the biocomposite. Dewaxing, alkali treatment, isocyanate treatment, peroxide treatment, vinyl grafting, bleaching, acetylation, and treatment with coupling agents are useful ways to improve fiber-matrix adhesion in natural fiber composites. Two major areas of biocomposites will be discussed in this article. One is the most predominant biocomposite currently being commercialized for semi-structural use in the durable goods industries, e.g. auto-industries, i.e. natural fiber-polypropylen...

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Topics: Biocomposite (68%), Natural fiber (56%)

805 Citations


Open access
David Dittenber1, Hota V. S. GangaRao1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 2011-
Abstract: Compared to most synthetic fibers, natural fibers are low-cost, are easier to handle, have good specific mechanical properties, and require only around 20–40% of the production energy. Using natural materials and modern construction techniques reduces construction waste and increases energy efficiency while promoting the concept of sustainability. Several drawbacks of natural composites which would be even more pronounced in their use in infrastructure include their higher moisture absorption, inferior fire resistance, lower mechanical properties and durability, variation in quality and price, and difficulty using established manufacturing practices when compared to synthetic composites. Many researchers have been working to address these issues, with particular attention paid to the surface treatment of fibers and improving the fiber/matrix interface. Because of their positive economic and environmental outlook, as well as their ability to uniquely meet human needs worldwide, natural composites are showing a good potential for use in infrastructure applications.

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791 Citations