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Book ChapterDOI

Field of Cherries

01 Mar 2023-pp 259-274
TL;DR: Scidmore and Fairchild planted a field of cherries on an avenue known as “the Speedway,” running past Potomac Park as mentioned in this paper , which was the first public airing of an idea Scidmore has championed, in slightly different form, for two decades.
Abstract: Abstract In her efforts to bring Japanese cherry trees to Washington, Eliza Scidmore finds collaborators in U.S. Department of Agriculture botanist David Fairchild and his wife, Marian (a daughter of Alexander Graham Bell). At a 1908 Arbor Day lecture at Franklin School, which Scidmore attends, Fairchild calls for planting a “field of cherries” on an avenue known as “the Speedway,” running past Potomac Park. It’s the first public airing of an idea Scidmore has championed, in slightly different form, for two decades. Despite the common goal she and the Fairchilds now share, resistance by the city’s park officials remains an obstacle. Meanwhile, the press reveals Scidmore as the author of the anonymously published novel As the Hague Ordains (1907), based on her reporting of Russian POWs in Japan during the Russo–Japanese War. The emperor of Japan awards Scidmore a medal for her writing about his country.