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MonographDOI

Fog of war : the Second World War and the civil rights movement

TL;DR: In this paper, the Second World War and the Civil Rights Movement are discussed, with a focus on women's roles in the movement and the role of women in the war effort.
Abstract: Contributors Introduction: The Second World War and the Civil Rights Movement- Kevin M. Kruse and Stephen Tuck Chapter 1: Freedom to Want: The Federal Government and Politicized Consumption in World War II- James T. Sparrow Chapter 2: Confronting the Roadblock: Congress, Civil Rights and World War II- Julian E. Zelizer Chapter 3: Segregation and the City: White Supremacy in Alabama in the Mid-Twentieth Century- J. Mills Thornton III Chapter 4: Movement Building during the World War II Era: The NAACP's Legal Insurgency in the South- Patricia Sullivan Chapter 5: Hillburn, Hattiesburg, and Hitler: Wartime Activists Think Globally and Act Locally- Thomas Sugrue Chapter 6: "You can sing and punch EL but you can't be a soldier or a man": African American Struggles for a New Place in Popular Culture- Stephen Tuck Chapter 7: "A War for States' Rights": The White Supremacist Vision of Double Victory- Jason Morgan Ward Chapter 8: The Sexual Politics of Race in WWII America- Jane Dailey Chapter 9: Civil Rights and World War II in a Global Frame: Shape-shifting Racial Formations and the U.S. Encounter with European and Japanese Colonialism- Penny Von Eschen Chapter 10: Race, Rights, and Non-Governmental Organizations at the UN San Francisco Conference: A Contested History of "Human Rights ... without discrimination"- Elizabeth Borgwardt Chapter 11: "Did the Battlefield Kill Jim Crow?": The Cold War Military, Civil Rights, and Black Freedom Struggles- Kimberley L. Phillips
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BookDOI
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: The Leap of Faith project as discussed by the authors examines the evolution of the relationship between taxpayers and their states in Sweden, Italy, United Kingdom, the United States, and Romania, and asks why tax compliance is so much higher in some countries than others.
Abstract: This book examines the evolution of the relationship between taxpayers and their states in Sweden, Italy, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Romania, and asks why tax compliance is so much higher in some countries than others. The book shows that successful states have built strong administrative capacities, tax citizens fairly and equitably, and deliver public services that are tangible to taxpayers. The main substantive chapters explore the history of a particular country demonstrating how and why these capacities were developed (or not). The book is part of a larger project entitled “Willing to Pay?” which brings together historical institutional analysis with experimental methods. A series of articles as well as a subsequent book elaborate the specific findings from the experiments undertaken in each country. These experiments, however, cannot tell us why compliance behavior differs so much across societies. The Leap of Faith offers just such an explanation by showing the history of the relationship between taxpayers and their states over time in several countries, allowing an answer to the question: Why are some countries more successful at implementation than others? The book concludes with a policy-oriented chapter written specifically with tax and revenue administrators in the developing world in mind. Drawing on lessons from the historical chapters it is argued that effective administration and equitable distribution of both taxes and public spending are keys to generating taxpayer consent.

89 citations

Book
15 Sep 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on the rise of transnational constitutional laws, primarily created by the interaction between national and international courts, and by the domestic transformation of international law, and explain how the growth of global constitutional norms has provided a stabilizing framework for the functions of state institutions.
Abstract: This volume focuses on the rise of transnational constitutional laws, primarily created by the interaction between national and international courts, and by the domestic transformation of international law. Through detailed analysis of patterns of institutional formation at key historical junctures in a number of national societies, it examines the social processes that have locked national states into an increasingly transnational constitutional order, and it explains how the growth of global constitutional norms has provided a stabilizing framework for the functions of state institutions. The book adopts a distinctive historical-sociological approach to these questions, examining the deep continuities between national constitutional law and contemporary models of global law. The volume makes an important contribution to the sociology of constitutional law, to the sociology of post-national legal processes, and to the sociology of human rights law. This title is also available as Open Access.

47 citations

Book
14 Mar 2019
TL;DR: Rosenfeld as mentioned in this paper explores the universalization of the Fourth Reich by left-wing radicals in the 1960s, its transformation into a source of pop culture entertainment in the 1970s, and its embrace by authoritarian populists and neo-Nazis seeking to attack the European Union since the year 2000.
Abstract: Ever since the collapse of the Third Reich, anxieties have persisted about Nazism's revival in the form of a Fourth Reich. Gavriel D. Rosenfeld reveals, for the first time, these postwar nightmares of a future that never happened and explains what they tell us about Western political, intellectual, and cultural life. He shows how postwar German history might have been very different without the fear of the Fourth Reich as a mobilizing idea to combat the right-wing forces that genuinely threatened the country's democratic order. He then explores the universalization of the Fourth Reich by left-wing radicals in the 1960s, its transformation into a source of pop culture entertainment in the 1970s, and its embrace by authoritarian populists and neo-Nazis seeking to attack the European Union since the year 2000. This is a timely analysis of a concept that is increasingly relevant in an era of surging right-wing politics.

44 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Stein et al. as mentioned in this paper examined how economic development shaped African American suburbanization on Long Island, New York from 1920 through 1980, and found that African Americans disproportionately suffered from the transition, and their economic plight shaped the outcomes of local housing segregation.
Abstract: SUBURBS IN BLACK AND WHITE: RACE, JOBS & POVERTY IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY LONG ISLAND By Tim Keogh Advisor: Professor Judith Stein “Suburbs in Black and White” examines how economic development shaped African American suburbanization on Long Island, New York from 1920 through 1980. After 1940, the fortunes of Long Island’s growing black population shifted from widespread poverty to upward social mobility, though by the 1960s, a divide emerged between the rising black middle class and black working poor, and distinctly ‘black’ suburbs emerged with problems familiar to postwar inner cities. While urban racial inequality is often framed in terms of housing segregation and the city/suburb divide, census and labor market data reveal that structural economic change across the New York metropolitan region produced the racial gap and intra-racial class divide, regardless of urban or suburban residence. Long Island’s economy experienced the national labor market ‘twist’ after World War II, as job opportunities expanded for skilled workers and contracted for the unskilled. By the 1970s, deindustrialization reached the suburbs, leading to further job loss and strained suburban tax systems. African Americans disproportionately suffered from the transition, and their economic plight shaped the outcomes of local housing segregation. Nonetheless, the ideology of suburban ‘affluence’ and the dualism of black city versus white suburb dominated public policy in the 1960s and 1970s, obscuring the shared plight of postwar African American urban and suburban residents. By viewing the postwar suburbs from the perspective of the suburban labor market, this dissertation integrates the urban fringe and its minority residents into the broader history of late twentieth century racial and class inequality.

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors provides a review of the origins and legacy of the 1964 Civil Rights Act through the lens of the African American Civil Rights and the Women’s Rights Movements using psychological, historical, and legal source material.
Abstract: This paper provides a historical review of the origins and legacy of the 1964 Civil Rights Act through the lens of the African American Civil Rights and the Women’s Rights Movements. The historical narrative was developed using psychological, historical, and legal source material. While the Civil Rights Act did not immediately change the landscape of equality in the American workplace, it signaled a fundamental shift in the treatment of racial and gender diversity. In concert with other social, legal, and political shifts, it paved the way for progress on issues like affirmative action, pregnancy discrimination, and sexual harassment. Without an understanding of the historical development and consequences of the Civil Rights Act, it is easy to lose sight of how the act has shaped the understanding of equality in the American workforce. Further, the way in which rights movements evolved alongside each other illuminates a need to focus not only on equality between majority and minority groups but also on issues of equality among minority groups. Previous reviews of the Civil Rights Act and rights movements tend to focus narrowly on one issue or group, and approach that concern from a single academic discipline. In contrast, we provide a review of the roots and consequences of the Civil Rights Act based on the developments of two rights movements, and draw from sources in psychology, history, political science, and legal perspectives to provide a broader picture of this landmark legislation.

37 citations