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Journal ArticleDOI

Forage yield and quality of intercropped corn and soybean in narrow strips

01 Sep 2010-Spanish Journal of Agricultural Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA))-Vol. 8, Iss: 3, pp 713-721

AbstractMaize-soybean intercropping can increase forage quality with no detrimental effect on dry matter (DM) yield. The objective of this study was to compare corn-soybean intercrop in narrow strips with corn as monocrop in terms of DM yield and forage quality. This study was conducted in Matamoros, Coahuila (Mexico) in 2006 and 2007. Intercrops were established in rows spaced 0.50 m apart, evaluating alternate corn-soybean strips with one, two, three, and four rows per crop, and a treatment using an alternate twin-row planting pattern per crop, with a 1.0-m row-spacing. As control treatments, monocrops of corn in rows 0.76 m apart and soybean in rows 0.50 m apart were evaluated. A randomized complete block design with four replications was employed. Corn-soybean intercrop produced DM yields similar to those of monocropped corn due to higher corn yields in border rows adjacent to soybean. Crude protein (CP) yields per hectare in intercrop treatments were higher (27.5 to 42.8%) than those of monocropped corn, due to greater CP concentrations in intercrops (16 to 21 g kg ‐1 ). When soybean was harvested at the beginning maturity stage (R7), neutral detergent fiber concentration was reduced by 60 to 63 g kg ‐1 in corn-soybean intercropping compared to corn monocrop. Acid detergent fiber was not altered by intercropping. Results indicate that maize-soybean intercrop in narrow strips can provide forage quality advantages without affecting yield. Additional key words: chemical composition, dry matter and ear yields, dry matter partitioning, Glycine max, intraspecific competition, Zea mays.

Topics: Intercropping (54%), Forage (51%), Crop yield (50%)

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results showed that intercropping silage maize and faba beans is possible under Swedish climate conditions and improves the forage quality compared with sole maize.
Abstract: Cultivation of forage maize is increasing in Sweden. Sole maize is low in protein and supplementation of protein feed is needed. This study investigated whether forage maize and legumes can be intercropped in a system suitable for farmers (simultaneous sowing and harvest) under Swedish climate conditions, and whether intercropping maize and faba bean improves the forage quality compared with sole maize. Two field experiments were performed in which maize intercropped with faba bean (Vicia faba L.) in alternate rows with 0 or 60 kg N/ha was compared with sole maize crop with 120 kg N/ha. Maize dry matter (DM) yield decreased by intercropping (from mean 14,171 kg DM/ha for sole maize to 8,888–10,791 kg DM/ha for intercropped maize). Mean yield of faba bean ranged from 2,907 to 2,966 kg DM/ha. Compared with sole maize, intercropped treatments slightly increased forage protein content (mean increase 10–15 g/kg DM). Furthermore, intercropping increased forage in vitro organic matter digestibility by 4 % units (from 80.8 to 84.7 %), while the starch concentration slightly decreased from 316 to 236–254 g/kg DM. Intercropping increased neutral detergent fibre concentration from 435 to 478–497 g/kg DM and the sugar concentration from 57.3 to 61.5–72.3 g/kg DM. The results showed that intercropping silage maize and faba beans is possible under Swedish climate conditions.

13 citations


Cites background from "Forage yield and quality of intercr..."

  • ...[37] also reported increased levels of crude protein but a...

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Cereal-based forage production could be considered to have potential to supply great deal of energy-rich feed in animal diets. Experiment was conducted to evaluate effect of corn-soybean combinations of 75:25, 50:50 and 25:75 in addition to monocrops of corn and soybean to detremine forage dry matter (DM) yield and quality in corn-soybean intercropping. The crop combination ratio had significant effects on dry matter yield and nutritive quality of forage. The ratio of 75:25 and 50:50 recorded DM yields similar to those of monocropped corn (14.77 t/ha). Forage quality in terms of crude protein (CP) (75:25 ratio 12.75%, 50:50 ratio 13.73% and 25:75 ratio 14.68%) was improved by intercropping due to higher nitrogen availability for corn in intercropping compared with its sole crop (10.83% CP). Increase ratio of corn in corn-soybean mixture, negatively affectd neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) of forage and declined with increasing ratio of soybean plants. Combination ratio of 50:50 gave higher protein yield (1886.45 kg/ha) than other crop combination ratio. Among all the combination ratios, the 50:50 corn-soybean ratio was the optimum giving highest forage yield, protein content as well as protein yield.

12 citations


Cites background from "Forage yield and quality of intercr..."

  • ...In addition, results showed that CP yields per hectare increased with corn-legume intercrop than that of monocropped corn (Javanmard et al., 2009; Sánchez et al., 2010; Baghdadi et al., 2014)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In conclusion, alternating four maize rows with four soybean rows was the optimum row ratio in maize + soybean intercrop, though this needs to be further confirmed by more trials.
Abstract: The success of maize + soybean intercrop depends on the plant arrangement. An experiment was carried out to evaluate different row arrangements on intercrop forage yield, silage quality and maize grain yield in relation to maize as a sole crop. The experiment was set up with a randomized complete block design with eight row arrangements between maize and Soybean. Maize biomass yield among crop arrangements were similar, although, lower than the maize sole crop. On the other hand, these treatments showed higher soybean biomass yield, which in turn increased silage crude protein and crude protein yield per unit area. Maize thousand grain weight, grain yield per plant and per area was affected by the intercrop arrangements. The use of two corn rows + two soybean rows (2M+2S-30 cm) and four corn rows + four soybean rows (4M+4S-30 cm) showed higher crude protein yield per area associated with similar maize grain yield in relation to the sole maize crop. In conclusion, alternating four maize rows with four soybean rows was the optimum row ratio in maize + soybean intercrop, though this needs to be further confirmed by more trials.

11 citations


Cites background or result from "Forage yield and quality of intercr..."

  • ...These results corroborate with other scientific investigations (Erdal et al., 2016; Sánchez et al., 2010; Stella et al., 2016)....

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  • ...…(NDF) (%), acid detergent fiber (ADF) (%), and total digestible nutrients (TDN), they were similar among row arrangement tested, collaborating with Sánchez et al. (2010) who studying different row arrangements in maize + soybean intercropped during two agricultural years reported similar values…...

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  • ...Sánchez et al. (2010) reported that maize plants at border rows showed higher dry mass biomass, which turns out in similar yield of maize monocrop....

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  • ...Results resemble those reported by Sánchez et al. (2010) in a two-year study. jas.ccsenet.org Journal of Agricultural Science Vol. 11, No. 2; 2019 Note....

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30 Jun 2017
TL;DR: The response of yellow lupine to the neighbouring occurrence of oats and spring triticale, as well as the effect of Fabaceae on spring cereals and an estimation of the production effects of strip intercropping of those species were found.
Abstract: Background. The work uses the results from two field experiments on mixed sowings carried out in the years 2005–2012 at the experimental station in Mochelek (53o 13’ N; 17o 51’ E). The aim of the studies was to find the response of yellow lupine to the neighbouring occurrence of oats and spring triticale, as well as the effect of Fabaceae on spring cereals and an estimation of the production effects of strip intercropping of those species. Material and methods. The experimental factor was the position of a plant row on the plot: four rows into the plot away from the neighbouring species. The first row (contact row) was situated 12.5 cm away from the first row of the neighbouring species. The experimental unit was the subsequent plant rows, each 4 meter-long. The proximity of yellow lupine and oat plants was studied in the first experiment and yellow lupine and spring triticale in the second experiment. Results. The proximity of oats was unfavourable to yellow lupine plants, and the effect was statistically confirmed in the row directly adjacent to oats. A negative effect also occurred in the subsequent row, although it was smaller and in most cases not significant. The proximity of spring triticale was also unfavourable to yellow lupine plants, but to a smaller extent than in the case of oats and was limited only to the first, directly adjacent row of yellow lupine. On the other hand spring triticale, and especially oats, responded positively to the proximity of yellow lupine, but the effect occurred only in the first plant row. Conclusion. It was estimated that in strip intercropping of oats with yellow lupine and of spring triticale with yellow lupine, with 3 meter-long strips, up to 13.9% higher oat yields and 5.57% triticale yields may be obtained, but at the same time lower, by 0.62-2.13%, yellow lupine yields may be obtained than in pure sowing.

9 citations


Cites background from "Forage yield and quality of intercr..."

  • ...Studies on the conditions and effects of the strip intercropping system have been carried out in various foreign centres (Sanchez et al., 2010; Gou et al., 2016; Liu et al., 2017), as well as in Polish stations (Burczyk, 1999; Głowacka, 2010; Głowacka, 2014)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Harvesting time and type of accession of forage legumes are important factors to determine their performance as companion crops for cereals. The objective of this multi-year field trial was to evaluate different harvesting times of forage cluster bean accessions sown as companion crops with forage sorghum under irrigated conditions. Treatments included two accessions (BR-90 and BR-99) and four harvesting times (pre-flowering, complete flowering, 50 and 100% pod formation). The BR-99 accession harvested at 100% pod formation had greater performance with respect to green forage yield (20.42 t·ha-1) and dry matter biomass (5.80 t·ha-1) and it was statistically at par within the same accession harvested at 50% pod formation. The highest quality forage with the maximum crude protein and ether extractable fat and lowest crude fiber was recorded by BR-99 harvested at 50% pod formation, while BR-90 did not perform at par at all harvesting times. Harvesting of BR-99 at 100% pod formation also resulted in the highest net income along with the benefit-cost ratio. The harvesting of BR-99 at 50 and 100% pod formation resulted in non-significant differences of forage yields and economic returns, however, the quality of cluster bean forage deteriorated at 100% pod formation thus harvesting at 50% pod formation would be preferred.

7 citations


References
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