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Journal ArticleDOI

Fortifying bread with a mixture of wheat fiber and psyllium husk fiber plus three antioxidants

01 May 1997-Cereal Chemistry (The American Association of Cereal Chemists, Inc.)-Vol. 74, Iss: 3, pp 207-211
TL;DR: A 7:3 mixture of wheat fiber (WF) and psyllium husk fiber (PHF) was substituted for 10wt% of flour on a 14% mb, and the protein in the blend was restored to 103% by incorporating vital wheat gluten.
Abstract: A 7:3 (w/w) mixture of wheat fiber (WF) and psyllium husk fiber (PHF) was substituted for 10wt% of flour on a 14% mb, and the protein in the blend was restored to 103% by incorporating vital wheat gluten After adding 05% sodium stearoyl 2-lactylate, the blend (100 g) was fortified with a combination of fat-coated ascorbic acid (AsA), proteinencased (PE) β-carotene, and cold-water-dispersible (CWD) all-rac-α-tocopheryl acetate (ToAc) at levels of 72, 56, and 115 mg, respectively, of active material Adding the fiber ingredients to the pup loaf formula increased water absorption 25% and mixing time 50% and imparted stickiness to the dough The fiber and antioxidant bread showed a 10% reduction in loaf volume and a somewhat inferior crumb grain with an off-color caused by small, black specks on a dark gray background The crumb of the fiber and antioxidant bread remained much softer than control bread during one to seven days of storage at room temperature Caramel coloring masked the off-color
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the potential use of various commercial fibres (carob fibre, inulin and pea fibre), as fibre-enriching agents in breadmaking, is reported.

642 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, different cereal fibres (wheat, maize, oat and barley) were added at 3, 6 and 9 grams/100 grams level into a gluten-free bread formulation based on corn starch, rice flour and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC).
Abstract: The enrichment of gluten-free baked products with dietary fibre seems to be necessary since it has been reported that coeliac patients have generally a low intake of fibre due to their gluten-free diet. In the present study different cereal fibres (wheat, maize, oat and barley) were added at 3, 6 and 9 g/100 g level into a gluten-free bread formulation based on corn starch, rice flour and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC). Doughs were evaluated based on consistency, viscosity and thermal properties. Results showed that maize and oat fibre can be added to gluten-free bread with positive impact on bread nutritional and sensory properties. All breads with 9 g/100 g fibre increased the fibre content of control by 218%, but they were rated lower than those with 3 and 6 g/100 g fibre due to their powdery taste. The formulation containing barley fibre produced loaves that had more intense color and volume comparable to the control. During storage of breads a reduction in crumb moisture content and an increase in firmness were observed. The micrographs of the crumb showed the continuous matrix between starch and maize and/or oat fibre obtaining a more aerated structure.

236 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the effects of soluble, inuline, partially soluble, sugar beet (FX), pea cell wall (SW), and insoluble pea hull (EX) fibres on wheat dough mechanical, extensional and surface-related functional profile have been investigated by response surface methodology, and the parameters derived from the functional profile correlated.

182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the effect of successively replacing wheat flour with dietary fiber from wheat, oat, barley, and maize or cereal bran (CB) from wheat and oat and rice on cake batter, final cake quality parameters, as well as on product shelf-life was studied.
Abstract: The effect of successively replacing (10%, 20%, and 30%) wheat flour with dietary fiber (DF) from wheat, oat, barley, and maize or cereal bran (CB) from wheat, oat, and rice on cake batter, final cake quality parameters, as well as on product shelf-life was studied. Batter viscosity (control, 2.96; wheat fiber 30%, 20.21; rice bran 10%, 0.47 Pa sn), cake-specific volume (control, 2.27; wheat fiber 20%, 2.83; rice bran 30%, 1.94 cm3/g), porosity (control, 0.75; wheat fiber 30%, 0.81; rice bran 30%, 0.69), and crumb moisture content (control, 20.07%,; wheat fiber 30%, 26.45%; oat bran 30%, 13.89%) increased significantly (P < 0.05) with DF addition but decreased with CB addition. Addition of DF resulted in softer crumb texture (Control, 4.20 N; wheat fiber 20%, 3.19 N), while CB addition increased crumb firmness (rice bran 30%, 10.84 N), respectively. Minor differences were observed in the crumb and crust color of the DF cakes with respect to the control. Addition of CB decreased the L values of crumb color significantly and the decrease increased with increased level of CB incorporation. DF addition led to cakes with greater acceptance by panelists than CB addition, similar to the control. DF cakes stored in polyethylene bags at 25 °C and 60% relative humidity for 6 days showed delayed moisture loss and lower firmness compared to CB cakes. The optimal level of incorporation based both on the objective and sensory characteristics results was found 20% for DF and 10% for CB, respectively. Concluding, by incorporating DF or CB properly, cakes with improved nutritional value can be manufactured.

173 citations


Cites background from "Fortifying bread with a mixture of ..."

  • ...Several studies have been carried out showing the potential enrichment of wheat-based cereal products with dietary fiber (Gomez et al. 2008; Park et al. 1997; Rosell et al. 2006; Laurikainen et al. 1998; Wang et al. 2002; Tudorica et al. 2002)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Research on a variety of other products, however, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes and less commonly used cereals such as barley, which are potential sources of dietary fiber supplements are reviewed.
Abstract: Interest in the fiber content of foods has decreased in recent years as concerns about fat intake have increased. Fiber, however, remains an important component of the diet. Soluble dietary fiber, including pectic substances and hydrocolloids, is found naturally in foods such as fruits, vegetables, legumes and oat bran. Insoluble fiber, including cellulose and hemicellulose, is found in foods such as whole grains. Fiber supplementation has been used to enhance the fiber content of a variety of foods ranging from cereal-based products to meats, imitation cheeses and sauces. Products used to enhance fiber content of foods have traditionally come from cereals such as wheat, corn and oats. There are a variety of other products, however, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes and less commonly used cereals such as barley, which are potential sources of dietary fiber supplements. This article reviews research on some of these underutilized sources of dietary fiber.

172 citations


Cites background from "Fortifying bread with a mixture of ..."

  • ...Fiber content of the substituted bread was reported to be 2.1 g/28 g slice with about 30% of the fiber in the soluble form [ 68 ]....

    [...]

  • ...Psyllium. Park et al. [ 68 ] substituted a 7:3 mixture of wheat fiber and psyllium husk fiber for 10 wt% flour in bread....

    [...]

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1986-Gut
TL;DR: The differentiating effect ofbutyrate on colon carcinoma cells may be relevant to the presence of butyrate in the colonic contents and the relationship between short chain fatty acids and fibre intake.
Abstract: The effects of short chain fatty acids on a colon carcinoma cell line, LIM1215, have been studied. Of the four short chain fatty acids tested only butyrate at 1 mmol/l and 10 mmol/l and acetate at 10 mmol/l had significant effects on this cell line. The addition of butyrate to growth medium affected the growth rate and the production of alkaline phosphatase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV and carcinoembryonic antigen. Butyrate at a final concentration of 1 mmol/l increased the doubling time of the cells from 26 hours to 72 hours and decreased the cloning efficiency of the cells from 1.1% to 0.054%. Alkaline phosphatase concentrations increased rapidly in cells cultured in 1 mmol/l butyrate reaching peak levels after four days with alkaline phosphatase concentrations increasing more than six-fold. Levels of dipeptidyl peptidase IV and carcinoembryonic antigen were also increased after culture in butyrate containing medium. The number of alkaline phosphatase containing and dipeptidyl peptidase IV containing cells increased markedly in butyrate containing cultures. In contrast the number of mucus containing cells decreased in cultures grown in medium containing butyrate. This differentiating effect of butyrate on colon carcinoma cells may be relevant to the presence of butyrate in the colonic contents and the relationship between short chain fatty acids and fibre intake.

281 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: OB but not WB significantly reduced total cholesterol and other atherogenic lipoprotein fractions independent of other dietary changes.

164 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, various amounts of apple fiber and cellulose were added to wheat gluten and water-holding capacities (WHC) of the different mixtures were determined, indicating a possible interaction between fiber and gluten which reduced the WHC of mixtures.
Abstract: Various amounts of apple fiber and cellulose were added to wheat gluten and water-holding capacities (WHC) of the different mixtures were determined. A linear relationship between concentrations of two kinds of fiber and WHC was not observed, indicating a possible interaction between fiber and gluten which reduced the WHC of mixtures. Mixograph studies of wheat flour and fiber mixtures demonstrated that the dilution of gluten by fiber could not account for all of the observed changes in mixing properties of the wheat flour/fiber blends. This is further evidence for a possible interaction of fiber and gluten which may explain the poor baking properties of apple fiber bread.

120 citations