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Book ChapterDOI

Frederick Jackson Turner and Buffalo Bill

31 Dec 2019-pp 6-65
TL;DR: Turner as mentioned in this paper was the most eminent historian of his generation, who delivered an academic paper at the historical congress convened in conjunction with the Columbian Exposition, which celebrated the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the Western Hemisphere.
Abstract: Americans have never had much use for history, but we do like anniversaries. In 1893 Frederick Jackson Turner, who would become the most eminent historian of his generation, was in Chicago to deliver an academic paper at the historical congress convened in conjunction with the Columbian Exposition. The occasion for the exposition was a slightly belated celebration of the four hundredth anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the Western Hemisphere. The paper Turner presented was "The Significance of the Frontier in American History." 1
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined marketers' processes of producing cultural meanings at a western stock show and rodeo and found that these meanings and values of freedom, naturalism, competition, and family values are produced by marketers in attracting a non-ranch audience; juxtaposing business, education, and entertainment; and using business activity as the basis for claims of authenticity.
Abstract: The author employs critical ethnographic methods to examine empirically marketers’ processes of producing cultural meanings at a western stock show and rodeo. Western cultural meanings and values of freedom, naturalism, competition, and family values are produced by marketers in attracting a nonranch audience; juxtaposing business, education, and entertainment; making ample references to historical tradition; and using business activity as the basis for claims of authenticity. Marketing implications center on tapping into rich sources of cultural meaning by (1) attending to the cultural dimensions of economic activity, (2) taking industry as the unit of analysis through an examination of representations of production in market discourses and practices, (3) expanding history from a research method to a source of market meaning, and (4) considering the marketplace as a lived tradition.

271 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, consumers recreate western cultural meanings and memories related to competition, naturalism, freedom/independence, and family tradition in their interactions with ranchers, booth exhibitors, animals, and artifacts of western history.
Abstract: This ethnographic research examines consumers' cultural production at a cattle trade show and rodeo. Consumers recreate western cultural meanings and memories related to competition, naturalism, freedom/independence, and family tradition in their interactions with ranchers, booth exhibitors, animals, and artifacts of western history. Consumers' cultural production processes are documented at four levels: consumer behavior, situational positioning, subcultural interactions, and market interactions. Implications elaborate the significance of consumers' active, yet constrained production processes; the role of cultural meanings as market mediators; and issues in consuming another culture.

244 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the museum privileges images of masculinity and whiteness, while using the props, films, and posters of Buffalo Bill's Wild West to carnivalize the violent conflicts between Anglo Americans and Native Americans.
Abstract: Few places tell the myth of the American frontier more vigorously than the Buffalo Bill Museum does in Cody, Wyoming. Traveling to the museum through the ‘Western’ landscape of Wyoming into the foothills of the Rockies prepares visitors for the tale of Western settlement. This narrative, which works to secure a particular vision of the West, draws upon the material artifacts of Cody’s childhood and his exploits as scout, Pony Express rider and showman. The museum retells the story that Cody first told to millions at the turn of the twentieth century in his Wild West arena show. In this paper, we argue that the museum privileges images of masculinity and Whiteness, while using the props, films, and posters of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West to carnivalize the violent conflicts between Anglo Americans and Native Americans.

99 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a story of competing rationalities about the purpose and nature of rural "settlement", both past and present, and the implications of these rationalities for contemporary Indigenous population dynamics are discussed.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examine the work of a group of historians who have foregrounded the relations between facts and values in the writing of historical geography, and explore how attention to the interplay between fact and values might rekindle the utopian dimension of explicitly political historical geographies.
Abstract: The relations between facts and values in the writing of historical geography need to be mutual and reinforcing. I explore this point by examining the work of a group of historians who have foregrounded the relations between facts and values. These New Western Historians take up themes such as social justice, regionalism, and environmentalism that have been central to the concerns of historical geographers, but they are more explicit than many historical geographers about both the political motivations behind the questions they ask and their choice of subjects to study. I consider the work of two historians, William Cronon and Donald Worster, who have made environmentalism the core of their historical writing, and two others, Richard White and Patricia Limerick, for whom questions of social justice inform historical interpretation. I conclude by exploring how attention to the interplay between facts and values might rekindle the utopian dimension of explicitly political historical geographies.

39 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1960

41 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Remington, Wister, and Wister as mentioned in this paper described the formation of an Eastern Establishment and the Western Experience, 1835-1885, and the Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans.
Abstract: Preface Preface to the Paperback Edition Introduction Part I: The East 1. The Formation of an Eastern Establishment 2. Easterners and the Western Experience, 1835-1885 3. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: The East and Adolescence Part II: The West 4. Roosevelt's West: The Beat of Hardy Life 5. Remington's West: Men with the Bark On 6. Wister's West: The Cowboy as Cultural Hero Part III: East and West in the Decade of Consensus 7. The Rough Riders: Regiment of True Americans 8. Technocracy and Arcadia: Conservation under Roosevelt 9. Remington, Roosevelt, Wister: Consensus and the West References Index

35 citations


"Frederick Jackson Turner and Buffal..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Upper-class easterners, from Owen Wister (the author of The Virginian [1902]) to Frederic Remington to Teddy Roosevelt, created or adopted cowboy identities.(82) Roosevelt turned his quest for manhood into a western story....

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