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Journal ArticleDOI

From "black rice" to "brown": rethinking the history of risiculture in the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Atlantic.

01 Feb 2010-The American Historical Review (Am Hist Rev)-Vol. 115, Iss: 1, pp 151-163
About: This article is published in The American Historical Review.The article was published on 2010-02-01. It has received 20 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Historiography.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyze the early post-Columbian history of live fencing in the Americas, focusing on Spanish-held areas in the 1500s and 1600s, and show that live fences bear Native American, European and African inheritances.
Abstract: Geographers have generally neglected African influences in attempting to understand the historical development of cultural landscapes in the tropical and subtropical Americas. In this paper, I analyze the early post-Columbian history of live fencing in the Americas, focusing on Spanish-held areas in the 1500s and 1600s. Live fences characterize many modern landscapes in the tropical and subtropical Americas, but the historical geography of these landscape features is poorly known. I show that live fences bear Native American, European and African inheritances, but argue that the African contribution was particularly significant. Specifically, escaped slaves – or maroons – like many contemporaneous communities in Africa, experienced conditions of endemic warfare and labour shortage. Live fences were an effective and labour-efficient means of defence, and all descriptions of live fences in the tropical and subtropical Americas before about 1800 were observed in maroon settlements. As African communities integrated into the multicultural societies of tropical and subtropical America other benefits of live fencing came to be more widely valued and integral to land management throughout the region – though its African inheritance has been forgotten. To understand more completely the historical cultural ecology of the Americas, geographers must challenge the deeply rooted belief that Africans contributed only labour in the development of New World landscapes.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored the consequences of that interaction during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries for the societies of the Carolina Lowcountry, as well as for societies of coastal Guinea and Sierra Leone.
Abstract: Plantation slavery and rice agriculture in the Carolina Lowcountry drew upon captive Africans from a wide area of the African continent, but particular note has been made of the contributions of enslaved Africans originating in the Upper Guinea coast region who had sophisticated knowledge of indigenous rice agriculture. The “Black Rice Hypotheses” argues that their knowledge was crucial to the successful plantation regimes. Papers collected in this issue of Atlantic Studies: Global Currents explore the consequences of that interaction during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries for the societies of the Carolina Lowcountry, as well as for the societies of coastal Guinea and Sierra Leone.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors provides an overview of how collaboration among historic preservationists, archaeologists, biologists, federal and state agencies, consultants, and plantation managers resulted in new methods of permitting work in historic tidal rice fields and new understandings of rice fields as significant historic properties.
Abstract: South Carolina’s tidal rice fields are significant historic and cultural landscapes. A critical piece of the cultural significance is continuity in the process of using the land. This essay provides an overview of how collaboration among historic preservationists, archaeologists, biologists, federal and state agencies, consultants, and plantation managers resulted in new methods of permitting work in historic tidal rice fields and new understandings of rice fields as significant historic properties.

1 citations