scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

From the Holocaust to the Holocaust

21 Dec 1979-Telos (Telos Press)-Vol. 1979, Iss: 42, pp 137-143
TL;DR: As the war ends, the massive revelation of the genocide committed against the Jewish people and of the way it was carried out stupefies the Western world as mentioned in this paper, and European nations understand and recognize the immensity and unique nature of the crime with blinding immediacy.
Abstract: As the war ends, the massive revelation of the genocide committed against the Jewish people — and of the way it was carried out — stupefies the Western world. Infected to the core by the poison of anti-Semitism — and knowing that, to varying degrees, they are almost all guilty — the European nations understand and recognize the immensity and unique nature of the crime with blinding immediacy. So all is now clear, neither discussion nor contestation nor denial is possible; the Nazi crime has no precedent and, at the same time, it is unsurpassable precisely because it is an absolute crime.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
Glen Creeber1
TL;DR: The authors argues that the rise of the television serial actually indicates the coming of age of TV drama, arguing that the serial is a particularly suitable form for the portrayal of large historical narratives, especially those that, by necessity, cover a large area both in terms of space and time.
Abstract: This article argues against the generally agreed assumption that the demise of the single play heralded the decline in the standards of television drama generally. In contrast, it suggests that the rise of the television serial actually indicates the coming of age of TV drama. Unlike the `teleplay' that originally arose out of a strong theatrical tradition, the serial or `mini-series' better utilizes the generic aesthetics of television and the fundamental dynamics of its audience's viewing habits. In particular, it will demonstrate how the episodic nature of the drama serial successfully mimics and harnesses the many complex, multi-layered levels of both the series and soap opera, while retaining and redefining the finite narrative arch of the single play. This makes the serial a particularly suitable form for the portrayal of large historical narratives, especially those that, by necessity, cover a large area both in terms of space and time. Paying close attention to serials such as Roots (1977), Holoca...

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role of the bystander has been defined in terms of charitable rescue or negligence as discussed by the authors, which ignores the complex political dimensions of bystander responsibilities for systemic mass violence, especially those responsibilities that stem from the benefits that bystanders receive.
Abstract: Political responsibilities for systemic mass violence have been subordinated to the moral guilt and legal liability of perpetrators and collaborators, while the role of the bystander has been narrowly construed in terms of charitable rescue or negligence. This dominant victim–perpetrator framework ignores the complex political dimensions of bystander responsibilities for systemic mass violence, especially those responsibilities that stem from the benefits that bystanders receive. The films of Claude Lanzmann, Rithy Panh, and Yael Hersonski contain elements of an alternative framework of bystander responsibility and also can serve as catalysts for the political education of bystander beneficiaries and those from whom they have benefited.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors make a reinterpretation of Adorno's comment: from a stricture against writing to a statement about the ethics of reading; not a warning against writing atrocity so much as a call for recognizing the atrocity in what we read.
Abstract: After When Adorno made his famous statement in 1949 that "to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric," Paul Celan had already penned "Todesfuge" ("Deathfugue," 1944), one of the most famous poems on the Holocaust, Primo Levi his account of survival in Auschwitz, Se questo e un uomo (If This Is a Man, 1947), and Charlotte Delbo the first section of her trilogy Auschwitz et Apres, Aucun de nous ne reviendra (None of Us Will Return, 1946). The Auschwitz experience evidently stimulated rather than stifled the need for literary expression. This context of literary output inspires a reinterpretation of Adorno's comment: from a stricture against writing to a statement about the ethics of reading; not a warning against writing atrocity so much as a call for recognizing the atrocity in what we read. Nor does Adorno say anything on writing about Auschwitz; as Law- rence Langer points out, this statement appears in an essay that has "little or nothing to do with Holocaust literature or the experience it sought to express" (2006: 123). Adorno makes no claim to the exceptionality of writing about this historical event, which may itself be exceptional — only to an exceptional shift in cultural consciousness, commenting on the time after the event. This reference to chronology rather than content places an emphasis on how we read rather than what we read, imply- ing that we cannot read with conventional assumptions and expectations after Auschwitz has impinged upon our consciousness. The Holocaust radically altered the meaning of practically everything once considered familiar: the concepts of good and evil, civilization, family, friends, com- munity, culture, self, what separates life from death. Adorno raises the question of how it forces us to read in a new way, see film differently,

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review essay examines several features of Lanzmann's classic film, assessing the tensions between the director's choices in his film and his public statements outside the film.
Abstract: This review essay examines several features of Lanzmann's classic film, assessing the tensions between the director's choices in his film and his public statements outside the film. By employing a perspective taken from live theater and applying it to Lanzmann's treatment of the film's witnesses, and evaluating the structural and thematic influence of the historian Raul Hilberg, the author seeks to define the legacy of the film twenty-five years after its original release.

5 citations