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Journal ArticleDOI

From the Holocaust to the Holocaust

21 Dec 1979-Telos (Telos Press)-Vol. 1979, Iss: 42, pp 137-143
TL;DR: As the war ends, the massive revelation of the genocide committed against the Jewish people and of the way it was carried out stupefies the Western world as mentioned in this paper, and European nations understand and recognize the immensity and unique nature of the crime with blinding immediacy.
Abstract: As the war ends, the massive revelation of the genocide committed against the Jewish people — and of the way it was carried out — stupefies the Western world. Infected to the core by the poison of anti-Semitism — and knowing that, to varying degrees, they are almost all guilty — the European nations understand and recognize the immensity and unique nature of the crime with blinding immediacy. So all is now clear, neither discussion nor contestation nor denial is possible; the Nazi crime has no precedent and, at the same time, it is unsurpassable precisely because it is an absolute crime.
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The Aufgabe der anstehenden Ausfuhrungen besteht darin, Ziele und Funktionen des Risiko-Controlling abzugrenzen und eine tragfahige Basis für die Entwicklung von Instrumenten as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Die Aufgabe der anstehenden Ausfuhrungen besteht darin, Ziele und Funktionen des Risiko-Controlling abzugrenzen und eine tragfahige Basis fur die Entwicklung von Instrumenten des Risiko-Controlling zu bilden. Da eine Bestimmung der Ziele und Funktionen fur das Risiko-Controlling als Teilbereich des Controlling erst nach einer Konkretisierung und Erlauterung der grundlegenden Charakteristika des Controlling erfolgen kann, soll zuvor auf den Inhalt des Controlling eingegangen werden.
Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2022
Journal ArticleDOI
25 Aug 2020
TL;DR: The authors discusses the apparent desire in Anglo-American Holocaust fiction to form a deeper connection to the horror of the Holocaust by recreating scenes of suffering in the gas chamber, and discusses the motives underlying these representations and what an audience stands to learn from these bodily encounters with the Holocaust past.
Abstract: This article discusses the apparent desire in Anglo-American Holocaust fiction to form a deeper connection to the horror of the Holocaust by recreating scenes of suffering in the gas chamber. Using Elaine Scarry’s The Body in Pain, Alison Landsberg’s theory of ‘prosthetic memory’ and the concept of ‘feeling-with’ as outlined by Sonia Kruks, it discusses the motives underlying these representations and what an audience stands to learn from these bodily encounters with the Holocaust past. The article begins by discussing texts that explore the notions of temporal and emotional distance and the unreachability of the Holocaust dead, while also reflecting the corresponding impulse to reconnect with the murdered by physicalising them as bodies in pain. It then moves on to works that aim to make the experience of death in the gas chamber literally inhabitable for present-day nonwitnesses. In pursuing this argument, the article focuses on six representative texts: Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List (1993), Bryan Singer’s Apt Pupil (1998), Tim Blake Nelson’s The Grey Zone (2001), The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas (2006 and 2008, for the book and film respectively), In Paradise (2014) by Peter Matthiessen and Mick Jackson’s Denial (2016).
Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: The historical experience of Jews in Britain has been instructively meaningful in numerous ways: how the Protestant majority treated one of its minorities from the Jew Bill of 1753 to the Aliens Act of 1905 with a mixture of tolerance and intolerance, in one of the West’s earliest attempts to deal with a multicultural reality.
Abstract: If Anglo-Jewish history has been marginalized, as Todd Endelman, David Feldman, David Katz, and other historians have protested, Jewish representations and Anglo-Jewish literature have been marginal as well, for many of the same reasons.1 Even the relatively small number of Jews in Britain distracts one from perceiving that around 1800, “London was a major center of urban Jewish life” and that “more Jews lived in London than in any other city” except Amsterdam.2 After the wave of East European immigration in the last three decades of the nineteenth century, London’s Jewish community numbered almost two hundred thousand, where it still remains. The historical experience of Jews in Britain, however, has been instructively meaningful in numerous ways: how the Protestant majority treated one of its minorities from the Jew Bill of 1753 to the Aliens Act of 1905 with a mixture of tolerance and intolerance, in one of the West’s earliest attempts to deal with a multicultural reality; how Protestant millenarianism led to philosemitism’s various constructions of what Jews were and how they should behave; how Jews became part of the British Empire’s involvement in the Middle East; how the Hebrew Bible and the Hebrew language became central in the Protestant attempt to achieve theological coherence in relation to modernity; how Jewish bankers provided essential support to the British state; and how someone like Benjamin Disraeli became one of Britain’s most important prime ministers; and, finally, how from the eighteenth century the mass of ordinary Jews—pedlars, artisans, shopkeepers, factory workers—experienced modernity with its pleasures and perplexities. The historical literature on the British Jews is now too substantial both in terms of its quantity and quality to ignore.