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Frontiers of philosophy and flesh : mapping conceptual metaphor in women's frontier revival literature, 1880-1930

TL;DR: The authors identify a genre of travel writing that they refer to as frontier revival literature, which is particularly important in negotiating North American ideas of imperialism, nationality, citizenship, gender, and race from 1880-1930.
Abstract: In this dissertation, I identify a genre of travel writing that I refer to as frontier revival literature, which I show to be particularly important in negotiating North American ideas of imperialism, nationality, citizenship, gender, and race from 1880-1930. Meaning about cultural identity emerges through motifs of physical movement in frontier revival literature. I focus on how female frontier revival authors appropriate familiar motifs of frontier revival literature to promote women’s rights. Frontier revival literature consists of tourist accounts of travel in western Canada by Canadian and American authors who published in northeastern American cities and who wrote for a largely eastern, urban audience. I show how male frontier revival literature authors use American manifest destiny rhetoric in a western Canadian setting to promote ideas of an intercontinental west that, despite seeming to broadly represent North American progress, are highly gendered and racialized. I combine and adapt elements of feminist and conceptual metaphor theory as a way of reading how women writers of the frontier revival debate such ideas through representations of physical movement. I build on a diverse range of feminist theory to examine how images of the travelling female body negotiate and often contest dominant ideological messages about cultural identity in travel literature by men. I develop conceptual metaphor theory in order to identify a network of metaphors that I see as emerging in frontier revival literature. Focussing on three different chronological stages of frontier revival literature, I apply my methodology in comparative close readings of the following texts by Canadian and American authors: Sara Jeannette Duncan’s A Social Departure: How Orthodocia and I Went Around the
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the various sides of each issue in a remarkably balanced manner and provide just the right amount of detail in each discussion to suggest further avenues of study for anyone inclined to pursue them.
Abstract: explanations for the public’s—some say inordinate—fear of radiation. One small disappointment is the occasional weak handling of technical matters. In particular, the explanations of the quantities and units related to radiation dose (e.g., rad and rem) are sometimes misleading or incorrect. Better, but still inadequate in my opinion, is the treatment of the effective-dose-equivalent concept. The latter is the method employed by the radiation-protection community that equates a given dose for an individual tissue or organ (such as the thyroid) to the smaller uniform whole-body dose that carries the same risk. Ironically, a misunderstanding of this method led to the widespread belief, described by Walker, that the NRC’s adoption of the effective-dose equivalent represented a relaxation of the exposure limits. My disappointment is minor, however. Walker is an excellent writer. His prose is clear, and the narrative develops a nice momentum that carries the reader along. Personal opinion is kept in the background while the author presents the various sides of each issue in a remarkably balanced manner. Just the right amount of detail is provided in each discussion to suggest further avenues of study for anyone inclined to pursue them. Depending on one’s reading habits, this informative and enjoyable book could be consumed easily in one or two sittings. Indeed, I found the time I devoted to it sufficiently well spent that I am tracking down the first two volumes in the series to discover what I have been missing.

46 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1983-Language
TL;DR: Lakoff and Johnson as discussed by the authors present a very attractive book for linguists to read, which is written in a direct and accessible style; while it introduces and uses a number of new terms, for the most part it is free of jargon.
Abstract: Every linguist dreams of the day when the intricate variety of human language will be a commonplace, widely understood in our own and other cultures; when we can unlock the secrets of human thought and communication; when people will stop asking us how many languages we speak. This day has not yet arrived; but the present book brings it somewhat closer. It is, to begin with, a very attractive book. The publishers deserve a vote of thanks for the care that is apparent in the physical layout, typography, binding, and especially the price. Such dedication to scholarly publication at prices which scholars can afford is meritorious indeed. We may hope that the commercial success of the book will stimulate them and others to similar efforts. It is also a very enjoyable and intellectually stimulating book which raises, and occasionally answers, a number of important linguistic questions. It is written in a direct and accessible style; while it introduces and uses a number of new terms, for the most part it is free of jargon. This is no doubt part of its appeal to nonlinguists, though linguists should also find it useful and provocative. It even has possibilities as a textbook. Lakoff and Johnson state their aims and claims forthrightly at the outset (p. 3):

7,812 citations

Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The Cognitive Science of Philosophy: A Cognitive Science Of Basic Philosophical Ideas as mentioned in this paper The Cognitive science of philosophy is a branch of the philosophy of early Greek metaphysics and philosophy of philosophy.
Abstract: * Introduction: Who Are We? How The Embodied Mind Challenges The Western Philosophical Tradition * The Cognitive Unconscious * The Embodied Mind * Primary Metaphor and Subjective Experience * The Anatomy of Complex Metaphor * Embodied Realism: Cognitive Science Versus A Priori Philosophy * Realism and Truth * Metaphor and Truth The Cognitive Science Of Basic Philosophical Ideas * The Cognitive Science of Philosophical Ideas * Time * Events and Causes * The Mind * The Self * Morality The Cognitive Science Of Philosophy * The Cognitive Science of Philosophy * The Pre-Socratics: The Cognitive Science of Early Greek Metaphysics * Plato * Aristotle * Descartes and the Enlightenment Mind * Kantian Morality * Analytic Philosophy * Chomskys Philosophy and Cognitive Linguistics * The Theory of Rational Action * How Philosophical Theories Work Embodied Philosophy * Philosophy in the Flesh

6,747 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Nov 1993
TL;DR: The contemporary theory of metaphor is based on the notion of cross-domain mappings as discussed by the authors, which was introduced by Lakoff, who argued that metaphor is not in language at all but in the way we conceptualize one mental domain in terms of another.
Abstract: The Contemporary Theory of Metaphor George Lakoff Do not go gentle into that good night. -Dylan Thomas Death is the mother of beauty . . . -Wallace Stevens, “Sunday Morningq Introduction These famous lines by Thomas and Stevens are examples of what classical theorists, at least since Aristotle, have referred to as metaphor: instances of novel poetic language in which words like “mother,q “go,q and “nightq are not used in their normal everyday senses. In classical theories of language, metaphor was seen as a matter of language not thought. Metaphorical expressions were assumed to be mutually exclusive with the realm of ordinary everyday language: everyday language had no metaphor, and metaphor used mechanisms outside the realm of everyday conventional language. The classical theory was taken so much for granted over the centuries that many people didn't realize that it was just a theory. The theory was not merely taken to be true, but came to be taken as definitional. The word “metaphorq was defined as a novel or poetic linguistic expression where one or more words for a concept are used outside of its normal conventional meaning to express a “similarq concept. But such issues are not matters for definitions; they are empirical questions. As a cognitive scientist and a linguist, one asks: What are the generalizations governing the linguistic expressions referred to classically as “poetic metaphors?q When this question is answered rigorously, the classical theory turns out to be false. The generalizations governing poetic metaphorical expressions are not in language, but in thought: They are general mappings across conceptual domains. Moreover, these general principles which take the form of conceptual mappings, apply not just to novel poetic expressions, but to much of ordinary everyday language. In short, the locus of metaphor is not in language at all, but in the way we conceptualize one mental domain in terms of another. The general theory of metaphor is given by characterizing such cross-domain mappings. And in the process, everyday abstract concepts like time, states, change, causation, and purpose also turn out to be metaphorical. The result is that metaphor (that is, cross-domain mapping) is absolutely central to ordinary natural language semantics, and that the study of literary metaphor is an extension of the study of everyday metaphor. Everyday metaphor is characterized by a huge system of thousands of cross-domain mappings, and this system is made use of in novel metaphor.

3,810 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993

3,279 citations