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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ABEC82

GASP XXXIV: Unfolding the thermal side of ram pressure stripping in the jellyfish galaxy JO201

Abstract: X-ray studies of jellyfish galaxies play a crucial role in understanding the interactions between the interstellar medium (ISM) and the intracluster medium (ICM). In this paper, we focused on the jellyfish galaxy JO201. By combining archival Chandra observations, MUSE H$\alpha$ cubes, and maps of the emission fraction of the diffuse ionised gas, we investigated both its high energy spectral properties and the spatial correlation between its X-ray and optical emissions. The X-ray emission of JO201 is provided by both the Compton thick AGN (L$_{\text{X}}^{0.5-10 \text{keV}}$=2.7$\cdot$10$^{41}$ erg s$^{-1}$, not corrected for intrinsic absorption) and an extended component (L$_{\text{X}}^{0.5-10 \, \text{keV}}\approx$1.9-4.5$\cdot$10$^{41}$ erg s$^{-1}$) produced by a warm plasma (kT$\approx$1 keV), whose luminosity is higher than expected from the observed star formation (L$_{\text{X}}\sim$3.8$\cdot10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$). The spectral analysis showed that the X-ray emission is consistent with the thermal cooling of hot plasma. These properties are similar to the ones found in other jellyfish galaxies showing extended X-ray emission. A point-to-point analysis revealed that this X-ray emission closely follows the ISM distribution, whereas CLOUDY simulations proved that the ionisation triggered by this warm plasma would be able to reproduce the [OI]/H$\alpha$ excess observed in JO201. We conclude that the galactic X-ray emitting plasma is originated on the surface of the ISM as a result of the ICM-ISM interplay. This process would entail the cooling and accretion of the ICM onto the galaxy, which could additionally fuel the star formation, and the emergence of [OI]/H$\alpha$ excess in the optical spectrum.

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Topics: Absorption (logic) (57%), Intracluster medium (51%)
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7 results found


Open accessPosted Content
Abstract: The impact of ram pressure stripping (RPS) on galaxy evolution has been studied for over forty years. Recent multi-wavelength data have revealed many examples of galaxies undergoing RPS, often accompanied with multi-phase tails. As energy transfer in the multi-phase medium is an outstanding question in astrophysics, RPS galaxies are great objects to study. Despite the recent burst of observational evidence, the relationship between gas in different phases in the RPS tails is poorly known. Here we report, for the first time, a strong linear correlation between the X-ray surface brightness (SB$_{\rm X}$) and the H$\alpha$ surface brightness (SB$_{\rm H\alpha}$) of the diffuse gas in the RPS tails at $\sim$ 10 kpc scales, as SB$_{\rm X}$/SB$_{\rm H\alpha} \sim$ 3.6. This discovery supports the mixing of the stripped interstellar medium (ISM) with the hot intracluster medium (ICM) as the origin of the multi-phase RPS tails. The established relation in stripped tails, also in comparison with the likely similar correlation in similar environments like X-ray cool cores and galactic winds, provides an important test for models of energy transfer in the multi-phase gas. It also indicates the importance of the H$\alpha$ data for our understanding of the ICM clumping and turbulence.

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Topics: Ram pressure (51%), Intracluster medium (50%)

4 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/UNIVERSE7070209
24 Jun 2021-Universe
Abstract: Galaxy groups are more than an intermediate scale between clusters and halos hosting individual galaxies, they are crucial laboratories capable of testing a range of astrophysics from how galaxies form and evolve to large scale structure (LSS) statistics for cosmology. Cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of groups on various scales offer an unparalleled testing ground for astrophysical theories. Widely used cosmological simulations with ∼(100 Mpc)3 volumes contain statistical samples of groups that provide important tests of galaxy evolution influenced by environmental processes. Larger volumes capable of reproducing LSS while following the redistribution of baryons by cooling and feedback are the essential tools necessary to constrain cosmological parameters. Higher resolution simulations can currently model satellite interactions, the processing of cool (T≈104−5 K) multi-phase gas, and non-thermal physics including turbulence, magnetic fields and cosmic ray transport. We review simulation results regarding the gas and stellar contents of groups, cooling flows and the relation to the central galaxy, the formation and processing of multi-phase gas, satellite interactions with the intragroup medium, and the impact of groups for cosmological parameter estimation. Cosmological simulations provide evolutionarily consistent predictions of these observationally difficult-to-define objects, and have untapped potential to accurately model their gaseous, stellar and dark matter distributions.

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Topics: Galaxy group (61%), Galaxy formation and evolution (57%), Galaxy (57%) ... show more

2 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1093/MNRAS/STAB1569
Chong Ge1, Rongxin Luo1, Ming Sun1, Masafumi Yagi  +12 moreInstitutions (10)
Abstract: Recent studies have highlighted the potential significance of intracluster medium (ICM) clumping and its important implications for cluster cosmology and baryon physics. Many of the ICM clumps can originate from infalling galaxies, as stripped interstellar medium (ISM) mixing into the hot ICM. However, a direct connection between ICM clumping and stripped ISM has not been unambiguously established before. Here we present the discovery of the first and still the only known isolated cloud (or orphan cloud, OC) detected in both X-rays and H$\alpha$ in the nearby cluster Abell 1367. With an effective radius of 30 kpc, this cloud has an average X-ray temperature of 1.6 keV, a bolometric X-ray luminosity of $\sim 3.1\times 10^{41}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and a hot gas mass of $\sim 10^{10}\ {\rm M}_\odot$. From the MUSE data, the OC shows an interesting velocity gradient nearly along the east-west direction with a low level of velocity dispersion of $\sim 80$ km/s, which may suggest a low level of the ICM turbulence. The emission line diagnostics suggest little star formation in the main H$\alpha$ cloud and a LI(N)ER-like spectrum, but the excitation mechanism remain unclear. This example shows that the stripped ISM, even long time after the initial removal from the galaxy, can still induce the ICM inhomogeneities. We suggest that magnetic field can stabilize the OC by suppressing hydrodynamic instabilities and thermal conduction. This example also suggests that at least some ICM clumps are multi-phase in nature and implies that the ICM clumps can also be traced in H$\alpha$. Thus, future deep and wide-field H$\alpha$ survey can be used to probe the ICM clumping and turbulence.

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Topics: Intracluster medium (56%), Star formation (50%)

1 Citations


Open accessPosted Content
Abstract: The diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is an important component of the interstellar medium that can provide insights into the different physical processes affecting the gas in galaxies. We utilise optical IFU observations of 71 gas-stripped and control galaxies from the Gas Stripping Phenomena in galaxies (GASP) survey, to analyze the gas properties of the dense ionized gas and the DIG, such as metallicity, ionization parameter log(q), and the difference between the measured $\log[OI]/H\alpha$ and the value predicted by star-forming models, given the measured log[OIII]/H$\beta$ ($\Delta log[OI]/H\alpha$). We compare these properties at different spatial scales, among galaxies at different gas-stripping stages, and between disks and tails of the stripped galaxies. The metallicity is similar between the dense gas and DIG at a given galactocentric radius. The log(q) is lower for DIG compared to dense gas. The median values of log(q) correlate best with stellar mass, and the most massive galaxies show an increase in log(q) toward their galactic centers. The DIG clearly shows higher $\Delta log[OI]/H\alpha$ values compared to the dense gas, with much of the spaxels having LIER/LINER like emission. The DIG regions in the tails of highly stripped galaxies show the highest $\Delta log[OI]/H\alpha$, exhibit high values of log(q) and extend to large projected distances from star-forming areas (up to 10 kpc). We conclude that the DIG in the tails is at least partly ionized by a process other than star-formation, probably by mixing, shocks and accretion of inter-cluster and interstellar medium gas.

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Topics: Galaxy (52%)

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/AC230E
Abstract: The diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is an important component of the interstellar medium that can provide insights into the different physical processes affecting the gas in galaxies. We utilise optical IFU observations of 71 gas-stripped and control galaxies from the Gas Stripping Phenomena in galaxies (GASP) survey, to analyze the gas properties of the dense ionized gas and the DIG, such as metallicity, ionization parameter log(q), and the difference between the measured $\log[OI]/H\alpha$ and the value predicted by star-forming models, given the measured log[OIII]/H$\beta$ ($\Delta log[OI]/H\alpha$). We compare these properties at different spatial scales, among galaxies at different gas-stripping stages, and between disks and tails of the stripped galaxies. The metallicity is similar between the dense gas and DIG at a given galactocentric radius. The log(q) is lower for DIG compared to dense gas. The median values of log(q) correlate best with stellar mass, and the most massive galaxies show an increase in log(q) toward their galactic centers. The DIG clearly shows higher $\Delta log[OI]/H\alpha$ values compared to the dense gas, with much of the spaxels having LIER/LINER like emission. The DIG regions in the tails of highly stripped galaxies show the highest $\Delta log[OI]/H\alpha$, exhibit high values of log(q) and extend to large projected distances from star-forming areas (up to 10 kpc). We conclude that the DIG in the tails is at least partly ionized by a process other than star-formation, probably by mixing, shocks and accretion of inter-cluster and interstellar medium gas.

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Topics: Galaxy (52%)

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88 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1146/ANNUREV.ASTRO.46.060407.145222
Abstract: The solar chemical composition is an important ingredient in our understanding of the formation, structure, and evolution of both the Sun and our Solar System. Furthermore, it is an essential refer ...

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Topics: Solar chemical (55%)

7,780 Citations


Open accessBook
01 Jan 1989-
Abstract: Photoionization equilibrium thermal equilibrium calculation of emitted spectrum comparison of theory with observations internal dynamics of gaseous nebulae interstellar dust H II regions in the galactic context planetary nebulae nova and supernova remnants active galactic nuclei - diagnostic and physics active galactic nuclei - results.

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Topics: Interstellar medium (55%), Active galactic nucleus (55%), Cosmic dust (54%) ... show more

6,080 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1086/130766
Abstract: An investigation is made of the merits of various emission-line intensity ratios for classifying the spectra of extragalactic objects. It is shown empirically that several combinations of easily-measured lines can be used to separate objects into one of four categories according to the principal excitation mechanism: normal H II regions, planetary nebulae, objects photoionized by a power-law continuum, and objects excited by shock-wave heating. A two-dimensional quantitative classification scheme is suggested.

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Topics: Doubly ionized oxygen (51%)

4,302 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1051/0004-6361:20041864
Abstract: We present the final data release of observations of ?21-cm emission from Galactic neutral hydrogen over the entire sky, merging the Leiden/Dwingeloo Survey (LDS: Hartmann & Burton 1997, Atlas of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen) of the sky north of ? = ?30? with the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia Survey (IAR: Arnal et al. 2000, AA and Bajaja et al. 2005, A&A, 440, 767) of the sky south of ? = ?25?. The angular resolution of the combined material is HPBW ? 0. ?6. The LSR velocity coverage spans the interval ?450 km s?1 to +400 km s?1, at a resolution of 1.3 kms?1. The data were corrected for stray radiation at the Institute for Radioastronomy of the University of Bonn, refining the original correction applied to the LDS. The rms brightness-temperature noise of the merged database is 0.07?0.09 K. Residual errors in the profile wings due to defects in the correction for stray radiation are for most of the data below a level of 20?40 mK. It would be necessary to construct a telescope with a main beam efficiency of ?MB >? 99% to achieve the same accuracy. The merged and refined material entering the LAB Survey of Galactic HI is intended to be a general resource useful to a wide range of studies of the physical and structural characteristices of the Galactic interstellar environment. The LAB Survey is the most sensitive Milky Way HI survey to date, with the most extensive coverage both spatially and kinematically.

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4,122 Citations



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