scispace - formally typeset
Book ChapterDOI

Genomics and Traditional Indian Ayurvedic Medicine

01 Jan 2016-pp 271-292
TL;DR: Ayurgenomics is proposed as a novel approach for integration of Ayurveda into current medical practice to address the variability in therapeutic outcome as well as evolve preventive measures in health and disease.
Abstract: In the present times need is being felt for a change in paradigm from the current practice of modern medicine. This is not only to meet the challenges in diagnosis and treatment of chronic and complex diseases but also to address the variability in therapeutic outcome as well as evolve preventive measures in health and disease. The advent of genomics has provided a tremendous impetus to this area. However, there are a number of gaps before this is realized. Ayurveda, the ancient Indian system of predictive and personalized medicine still holds contemporary in the current era of P4 (predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory) medicine and also has a promotive component. Ayurveda has documented methods for maintenance of health and personalized management of diseases. It is also widely practiced in most Indian communities despite sociocultural variations and many aspects for preventive health are also integrated into Indian traditional living. Despite this a large number of challenges exist in getting this system to mainstream and for its global acceptability. This review highlights some of these aspects and also proposes Ayurgenomics as a novel approach for integration of Ayurveda into current medical practice.
Citations
More filters

Journal Article
TL;DR: Why interactome networks are important to consider in biology, how they can be mapped and integrated with each other, what global properties are starting to emerge from interactome network models, and how these properties may relate to human disease are detailed.
Abstract: Complex biological systems and cellular networks may underlie most genotype to phenotype relationships. Here, we review basic concepts in network biology, discussing different types of interactome networks and the insights that can come from analyzing them. We elaborate on why interactome networks are important to consider in biology, how they can be mapped and integrated with each other, what global properties are starting to emerge from interactome network models, and how these properties may relate to human disease.

1,209 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
30 Nov 2020-Medicina-lithuania
TL;DR: The development of Ayurgenomics could greatly enrich P4 medicine by providing a clear theoretical understanding of the whole patient and a practical application of ancient and modern preventative and therapeutic practices to improve mental and physical health.
Abstract: Within the disciplines of modern medicine, P4 medicine is emerging as a new field which focuses on the whole patient. The development of Ayurgenomics could greatly enrich P4 medicine by providing a clear theoretical understanding of the whole patient and a practical application of ancient and modern preventative and therapeutic practices to improve mental and physical health. One of the most difficult challenges today is understanding the ancient concepts of Ayurveda in terms of modern science. To date, a number of researchers have attempted this task, of which one of the most successful outcomes is the creation of the new field of Ayurgenomics. Ayurgenomics integrates concepts in Ayurveda, such as Prakriti, with modern genetics research. It correlates the combination of three doshas, Vata, Pitta and Kapha, with the expression of specific genes and physiological characteristics. It also helps to interpret Ayurveda as an ancient science of epigenetics which assesses the current state of the doshas, and uses specific personalized diet and lifestyle recommendations to improve a patient's health. This review provides a current update of this emerging field.

2 citations


Book Chapter
01 Mar 2010-
Abstract: Drug discovery and development (very often unknowingly) is based on traditional and local knowledge about a species’ medical use or toxicological effects (both desired and undesired effects). The list of compounds ultimately derived from such knowledge is very long indeed and includes morphine, codeine, and aspirin to name just a few but also drugs licensed relatively recently like galanthamine and artemisinine. Here I review this link and – using examples of new drugs currently under development preclinically or in clinical trials – discuss how such new drugs have been ‘discovered’, or more precisely developed into a clinically used medication.

2 citations


References
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
Eric S. Lander1, Lauren Linton1, Bruce W. Birren1, Chad Nusbaum1, Michael C. Zody1, Jennifer Baldwin1, Keri Devon1, Ken Dewar1, Michael Doyle1, William Fitzhugh1, Roel Funke1, Diane Gage1, Katrina Harris1, Andrew Heaford1, John Howland1, Lisa Kann1, Jessica A. Lehoczky1, Rosie Levine1, Paul A. McEwan1, Kevin McKernan1, James Meldrim1, Jill P. Mesirov1, Cher Miranda1, William Morris1, Jerome Naylor1, Christina Raymond1, Mark Rosetti1, Ralph Santos1, Andrew Sheridan1, Carrie Sougnez1, Nicole Stange-Thomann1, Nikola Stojanovic1, Aravind Subramanian1, Dudley Wyman1, Jane Rogers2, John Sulston2, R Ainscough2, Stephan Beck2, David Bentley2, John Burton2, C M Clee2, Nigel P. Carter2, Alan Coulson2, Rebecca Deadman2, Panos Deloukas2, Andrew Dunham2, Ian Dunham2, Richard Durbin2, Lisa French2, Darren Grafham2, Simon G. Gregory2, Tim Hubbard2, Sean Humphray2, Adrienne Hunt2, Matthew Jones2, Christine Lloyd2, Amanda McMurray2, Lucy Matthews2, Simon Mercer2, Sarah Milne2, James C. Mullikin2, Andrew J. Mungall2, Robert W. Plumb2, Mark T. Ross2, Ratna Shownkeen2, Sarah Sims2, Robert H. Waterston3, Richard K. Wilson3, LaDeana W. Hillier3, John Douglas Mcpherson3, Marco A. Marra3, Elaine R. Mardis3, Lucinda Fulton3, Asif T. Chinwalla3, Kymberlie H. Pepin3, Warren Gish3, Stephanie L. Chissoe3, Michael C. Wendl3, Kim D. Delehaunty3, Tracie L. Miner3, Andrew Delehaunty3, Jason B. Kramer3, Lisa Cook3, Robert S. Fulton3, Douglas L. Johnson3, Patrick Minx3, Sandra W. Clifton3, Trevor Hawkins4, Elbert Branscomb4, Paul Predki4, Paul G. Richardson4, Sarah Wenning4, Tom Slezak4, Norman A. Doggett4, Jan Fang Cheng4, Anne S. Olsen4, Susan Lucas4, Christopher J. Elkin4, Edward Uberbacher4, Marvin Frazier4, Richard A. Gibbs5, Donna M. Muzny5, Steven E. Scherer5, John Bouck5, Erica Sodergren5, Kim C. Worley5, Catherine M. Rives5, James H. Gorrell5, Michael L. Metzker5, Susan L. Naylor6, Raju Kucherlapati7, David L. Nelson8, George M. Weinstock8, Yoshiyuki Sakaki, Asao Fujiyama, Masahira Hattori, Tetsushi Yada, Atsushi Toyoda, Takehiko Itoh, Chiharu Kawagoe, Hidemi Watanabe, Yasushi Totoki, Todd D. Taylor, Jean Weissenbach9, Roland Heilig9, William Saurin9, François Artiguenave9, Philippe Brottier9, Thomas Brüls9, Eric Pelletier9, Catherine Robert9, Patrick Wincker9, André Rosenthal10, Matthias Platzer10, Gerald Nyakatura10, Stefan Taudien10, Andreas Rump10, Douglas R. Smith, Lynn Doucette-Stamm, Marc Rubenfield, Keith Weinstock, Mei Lee Hong, Joann Dubois, Huanming Yang11, Jun Yu11, Jian Wang11, Guyang Huang12, Jun Gu12, Leroy Hood13, Lee Rowen13, Anup Madan13, Shizen Qin13, Ronald W. Davis14, Nancy A. Federspiel14, A. Pia Abola14, Michael Proctor14, Bruce A. Roe15, Feng Chen15, Huaqin Pan15, Juliane Ramser16, Hans Lehrach16, Richard Reinhardt16, W. Richard McCombie17, Melissa De La Bastide17, Neilay Dedhia17, H. Blöcker, K. Hornischer, Gabriele Nordsiek, Richa Agarwala10, L. Aravind10, Jeffrey A. Bailey18, Alex Bateman2, Serafim Batzoglou1, Ewan Birney, Peer Bork19, Daniel G. Brown1, Christopher B. Burge1, Lorenzo Cerutti, Hsiu Chuan Chen10, Deanna M. Church10, Michele Clamp2, Richard R. Copley, Tobias Doerks19, Sean R. Eddy3, Evan E. Eichler18, Terrence S. Furey20, James E. Galagan1, James G. R. Gilbert2, Cyrus L. Harmon21, Yoshihide Hayashizaki, David Haussler20, Henning Hermjakob, Karsten Hokamp22, Wonhee Jang10, L. Steven Johnson3, Thomas A. Jones3, Simon Kasif1, Arek Kaspryzk, Scot Kennedy20, W. James Kent20, Paul Kitts10, Eugene V. Koonin10, Ian F Korf3, David Kulp21, Doron Lancet23, Todd M. Lowe14, Aoife McLysaght22, Tarjei S. Mikkelsen1, John V. Moran24, Nicola Mulder, Victor J. Pollara1, Chris P. Ponting25, Greg Schuler10, Jörg Schultz, Guy Slater, Arian F.A. Smit13, Elia Stupka, Joseph Szustakowki1, Danielle Thierry-Mieg10, Jean Thierry-Mieg10, Lukas Wagner10, John W. Wallis3, Raymond Wheeler21, Alan Williams21, Yuri I. Wolf10, Kenneth H. Wolfe22, Shiaw Pyng Yang3, Ru Fang Yeh1, Francis S. Collins10, Mark S. Guyer10, Jane Peterson10, Adam Felsenfeld10, Kris A. Wetterstrand10, Richard M. Myers14, Jeremy Schmutz14, Mark Dickson14, Jane Grimwood14, David R. Cox14, Maynard V. Olson26, Rajinder Kaul26, Christopher K. Raymond26, Nobuyoshi Shimizu27, Kazuhiko Kawasaki27, Shinsei Minoshima27, Glen A. Evans28, Maria Athanasiou28, Roger A. Schultz28, Aristides Patrinos4, Michael J. Morgan29 
15 Feb 2001-Nature
TL;DR: The results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome are reported and an initial analysis is presented, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.
Abstract: The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

21,023 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
J. Craig Venter1, Mark Raymond Adams1, Eugene W. Myers1, Peter W. Li1, Richard J. Mural1, Granger G. Sutton1, Hamilton O. Smith1, Mark Yandell1, Cheryl A. Evans1, Robert A. Holt1, Jeannine D. Gocayne1, Peter Amanatides1, Richard M. Ballew1, Daniel H. Huson1, Jennifer R. Wortman1, Qing Zhang1, Chinnappa D. Kodira1, Xiangqun H. Zheng1, Lin Chen1, Marian P. Skupski1, Gangadharan Subramanian1, Paul Thomas1, Jinghui Zhang1, George L. Gabor Miklos, Catherine R. Nelson2, Samuel Broder1, Andrew G. Clark3, J. H. Nadeau4, Victor A. McKusick5, Norton D. Zinder6, Arnold J. Levine6, Richard J. Roberts7, M. I. Simon8, Carolyn W. Slayman9, Michael W. Hunkapiller10, Randall Bolanos1, Arthur L. Delcher1, Ian M. Dew1, Daniel Fasulo1, Michael Flanigan1, Liliana Florea1, Aaron L. Halpern1, Sridhar Hannenhalli1, Saul A. Kravitz1, Samuel Levy1, Clark M. Mobarry1, Knut Reinert1, Karin A. Remington1, Jane Abu-Threideh1, Ellen M. Beasley1, Kendra Biddick1, Vivien Bonazzi1, Rhonda Brandon1, Michele Cargill1, Ishwar Chandramouliswaran1, Rosane Charlab1, Kabir Chaturvedi1, Zuoming Deng1, Valentina Di Francesco1, Patrick Dunn1, Karen Eilbeck1, Carlos Evangelista1, Andrei Gabrielian1, Weiniu Gan1, Wangmao Ge1, Fangcheng Gong1, Zhiping Gu1, Ping Guan1, Thomas J. Heiman1, Maureen E. Higgins1, Rui-Ru Ji1, Zhaoxi Ke1, Karen A. Ketchum1, Zhongwu Lai1, Yiding Lei1, Zhenya Li1, Jiayin Li1, Yong Liang1, Xiaoying Lin1, Fu Lu1, Gennady V. Merkulov1, Natalia Milshina1, Helen M. Moore1, Ashwinikumar K Naik1, Vaibhav A. Narayan1, Beena Neelam1, Deborah Nusskern1, Douglas B. Rusch1, Steven L. Salzberg, Wei Shao1, Bixiong Chris Shue1, Jingtao Sun1, Zhen Yuan Wang1, Aihui Wang1, Xin Wang1, Jian Wang1, Ming-Hui Wei1, Ron Wides11, Chunlin Xiao1, Chunhua Yan1, Alison Yao1, Jane Ye1, Ming Zhan1, Weiqing Zhang1, Hongyu Zhang1, Qi Zhao1, Liansheng Zheng1, Fei Zhong1, Wenyan Zhong1, Shiaoping C. Zhu1, Shaying Zhao, Dennis A. Gilbert1, Suzanna Baumhueter1, Gene Spier1, Christine Carter1, Anibal Cravchik1, Trevor Woodage1, Feroze Ali1, Huijin An1, Aderonke Awe1, Danita Baldwin1, Holly Baden1, Mary Barnstead1, Ian Barrow1, Karen Beeson1, Dana A. Busam1, Amy Carver1, Ming Lai Cheng1, Liz Curry1, Steve Danaher1, Lionel Davenport1, Raymond Desilets1, Susanne Dietz1, Kristina Dodson1, Lisa Doup1, Steven Ferriera1, Neha Garg1, Andres Gluecksmann1, Brit J. Hart1, Jason Haynes1, Charles Haynes1, Cheryl Heiner1, Suzanne Hladun1, Damon Hostin1, Jarrett Houck1, Timothy Howland1, Chinyere Ibegwam1, Jeffery Johnson1, Francis Kalush1, Lesley Kline1, Shashi Koduru1, Amy Love1, Felecia Mann1, David May1, Steven McCawley1, Tina C. McIntosh1, Ivy McMullen1, Mee Moy1, Linda Moy1, Brian Murphy1, Keith Nelson1, Cynthia Pfannkoch1, Eric Pratts1, Vinita Puri1, Hina Qureshi1, Matthew Reardon1, Robert Rodriguez1, Yu-Hui Rogers1, Deanna Romblad1, Bob Ruhfel1, Richard T. Scott1, Cynthia Sitter1, Michelle Smallwood1, Erin Stewart1, Renee Strong1, Ellen Suh1, Reginald Thomas1, Ni Ni Tint1, Sukyee Tse1, Claire Vech1, Gary Wang1, Jeremy Wetter1, Sherita Williams1, Monica Williams1, Sandra Windsor1, Emily Winn-Deen1, Keriellen Wolfe1, Jayshree Zaveri1, Karena Zaveri1, Josep F. Abril12, Roderic Guigó12, Michael J. Campbell1, Kimmen Sjölander1, Brian Karlak1, Anish Kejariwal1, Huaiyu Mi1, Betty Lazareva1, Thomas Hatton1, Apurva Narechania1, Karen Diemer1, Anushya Muruganujan1, Nan Guo1, Shinji Sato1, Vineet Bafna1, Sorin Istrail1, Ross Lippert1, Russell Schwartz1, Brian P. Walenz1, Shibu Yooseph1, David Allen1, Anand Basu1, James Baxendale1, Louis Blick1, Marcelo Caminha1, John Carnes-Stine1, Parris Caulk1, Yen-Hui Chiang1, My Coyne1, Carl Dahlke1, Anne Deslattes Mays1, Maria Dombroski1, Michael Donnelly1, Dale Ely1, Shiva Esparham1, Carl Fosler1, Harold Gire1, Stephen Glanowski1, Kenneth Glasser1, Anna Glodek1, Mark Gorokhov1, Ken Graham1, Barry Gropman1, Michael Harris1, Jeremy Heil1, Scott Henderson1, Jeffrey Hoover1, Donald Jennings1, Catherine Jordan1, James Jordan1, John Kasha1, Leonid Kagan1, Cheryl L. Kraft1, Alexander Levitsky1, Mark Lewis1, Xiangjun Liu1, John Lopez1, Daniel Ma1, William H. Majoros1, Joe McDaniel1, Sean C. Murphy1, Matthew Newman1, Trung Hieu Nguyen1, Ngoc Nguyen1, Marc Nodell1, Sue Pan1, Jim Peck1, Marshall Peterson1, William Rowe1, Robert Sanders1, John Scott1, Michael Simpson1, Thomas J. Smith1, Arlan Sprague1, Timothy B. Stockwell1, Russell Turner1, Eli Venter1, Mei Wang1, Meiyuan Wen1, David Wu1, Mitchell Wu1, Ashley Xia1, Ali Zandieh1, Xiaohong Zhu1 
16 Feb 2001-Science
TL;DR: Comparative genomic analysis indicates vertebrate expansions of genes associated with neuronal function, with tissue-specific developmental regulation, and with the hemostasis and immune systems are indicated.
Abstract: A 2.91-billion base pair (bp) consensus sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome was generated by the whole-genome shotgun sequencing method. The 14.8-billion bp DNA sequence was generated over 9 months from 27,271,853 high-quality sequence reads (5.11-fold coverage of the genome) from both ends of plasmid clones made from the DNA of five individuals. Two assembly strategies-a whole-genome assembly and a regional chromosome assembly-were used, each combining sequence data from Celera and the publicly funded genome effort. The public data were shredded into 550-bp segments to create a 2.9-fold coverage of those genome regions that had been sequenced, without including biases inherent in the cloning and assembly procedure used by the publicly funded group. This brought the effective coverage in the assemblies to eightfold, reducing the number and size of gaps in the final assembly over what would be obtained with 5.11-fold coverage. The two assembly strategies yielded very similar results that largely agree with independent mapping data. The assemblies effectively cover the euchromatic regions of the human chromosomes. More than 90% of the genome is in scaffold assemblies of 100,000 bp or more, and 25% of the genome is in scaffolds of 10 million bp or larger. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed 26,588 protein-encoding transcripts for which there was strong corroborating evidence and an additional approximately 12,000 computationally derived genes with mouse matches or other weak supporting evidence. Although gene-dense clusters are obvious, almost half the genes are dispersed in low G+C sequence separated by large tracts of apparently noncoding sequence. Only 1.1% of the genome is spanned by exons, whereas 24% is in introns, with 75% of the genome being intergenic DNA. Duplications of segmental blocks, ranging in size up to chromosomal lengths, are abundant throughout the genome and reveal a complex evolutionary history. Comparative genomic analysis indicates vertebrate expansions of genes associated with neuronal function, with tissue-specific developmental regulation, and with the hemostasis and immune systems. DNA sequence comparisons between the consensus sequence and publicly funded genome data provided locations of 2.1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A random pair of human haploid genomes differed at a rate of 1 bp per 1250 on average, but there was marked heterogeneity in the level of polymorphism across the genome. Less than 1% of all SNPs resulted in variation in proteins, but the task of determining which SNPs have functional consequences remains an open challenge.

11,645 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 2012-Nature
TL;DR: It is shown that evolutionary conservation and coding consequence are key determinants of the strength of purifying selection, that rare-variant load varies substantially across biological pathways, and that each individual contains hundreds of rare non-coding variants at conserved sites, such as motif-disrupting changes in transcription-factor-binding sites.
Abstract: By characterizing the geographic and functional spectrum of human genetic variation, the 1000 Genomes Project aims to build a resource to help to understand the genetic contribution to disease. Here we describe the genomes of 1,092 individuals from 14 populations, constructed using a combination of low-coverage whole-genome and exome sequencing. By developing methods to integrate information across several algorithms and diverse data sources, we provide a validated haplotype map of 38 million single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1.4 million short insertions and deletions, and more than 14,000 larger deletions. We show that individuals from different populations carry different profiles of rare and common variants, and that low-frequency variants show substantial geographic differentiation, which is further increased by the action of purifying selection. We show that evolutionary conservation and coding consequence are key determinants of the strength of purifying selection, that rare-variant load varies substantially across biological pathways, and that each individual contains hundreds of rare non-coding variants at conserved sites, such as motif-disrupting changes in transcription-factor-binding sites. This resource, which captures up to 98% of accessible single nucleotide polymorphisms at a frequency of 1% in related populations, enables analysis of common and low-frequency variants in individuals from diverse, including admixed, populations.

7,236 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
28 Oct 2010-Nature
Abstract: The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation as a foundation for investigating the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Here we present results of the pilot phase of the project, designed to develop and compare different strategies for genome-wide sequencing with high-throughput platforms. We undertook three projects: low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of 179 individuals from four populations; high-coverage sequencing of two mother-father-child trios; and exon-targeted sequencing of 697 individuals from seven populations. We describe the location, allele frequency and local haplotype structure of approximately 15 million single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1 million short insertions and deletions, and 20,000 structural variants, most of which were previously undescribed. We show that, because we have catalogued the vast majority of common variation, over 95% of the currently accessible variants found in any individual are present in this data set. On average, each person is found to carry approximately 250 to 300 loss-of-function variants in annotated genes and 50 to 100 variants previously implicated in inherited disorders. We demonstrate how these results can be used to inform association and functional studies. From the two trios, we directly estimate the rate of de novo germline base substitution mutations to be approximately 10(-8) per base pair per generation. We explore the data with regard to signatures of natural selection, and identify a marked reduction of genetic variation in the neighbourhood of genes, due to selection at linked sites. These methods and public data will support the next phase of human genetic research.

7,174 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Curtis Huttenhower1, Curtis Huttenhower2, Dirk Gevers1, Rob Knight3, Rob Knight4, Sahar Abubucker5, Jonathan H. Badger6, Asif T. Chinwalla5, Heather Huot Creasy7, Ashlee M. Earl1, Michael Fitzgerald1, Robert S. Fulton5, Michelle G. Giglio7, Kymberlie Hallsworth-Pepin5, Elizabeth A. Lobos5, Ramana Madupu6, Vincent Magrini5, John Martin5, Makedonka Mitreva5, Donna M. Muzny8, Erica Sodergren5, James Versalovic8, Aye Wollam5, Kim C. Worley8, Jennifer R. Wortman7, Sarah Young1, Qiandong Zeng1, Kjersti Aagaard8, Olukemi O. Abolude7, Emma Allen-Vercoe9, Eric J. Alm1, Eric J. Alm10, Lucia Alvarado1, Gary L. Andersen11, Scott Anderson1, Elizabeth L. Appelbaum5, Harindra Arachchi1, Gary C. Armitage12, Cesar Arze7, Tulin Ayvaz8, Carl C. Baker13, Lisa Begg13, Tsegahiwot Belachew13, Veena Bhonagiri5, Monika Bihan6, Martin J. Blaser14, Toby Bloom1, Vivien Bonazzi13, J. Paul Brooks15, Gregory A. Buck15, Christian J. Buhay8, Dana A. Busam6, Joseph L. Campbell13, Shane Canon11, Brandi L. Cantarel7, Patrick S. G. Chain16, Patrick S. G. Chain17, I. Min A. Chen11, Lei Chen5, Shaila Chhibba13, Ken Chu11, Dawn Ciulla1, Jose C. Clemente4, Sandra W. Clifton5, Sean Conlan13, Jonathan Crabtree7, Mary A. Cutting13, Noam J. Davidovics7, Catherine C. Davis18, Todd Z. DeSantis, Carolyn Deal13, Kimberley D. Delehaunty5, Floyd E. Dewhirst2, Elena Deych5, Yan Ding8, David J. Dooling5, Shannon Dugan8, Wm. Michael Dunne19, Wm. Michael Dunne5, A. Scott Durkin6, Robert C. Edgar, Rachel L. Erlich1, Candace N. Farmer5, Ruth M. Farrell20, Karoline Faust21, Michael Feldgarden1, Victor Felix7, Sheila Fisher1, Anthony A. Fodor22, Larry J. Forney23, Leslie Foster6, Valentina Di Francesco13, Jonathan Friedman10, Dennis C. Friedrich1, Catrina Fronick5, Lucinda Fulton5, Hongyu Gao5, Nathalia Garcia24, Georgia Giannoukos1, Christina Giblin13, Maria Y. Giovanni13, Jonathan M. Goldberg1, Johannes B. Goll6, Antonio Gonzalez4, Allison D. Griggs1, Sharvari Gujja1, Susan Kinder Haake25, Brian J. Haas1, Holli A. Hamilton13, Emily L. Harris13, Theresa A. Hepburn1, Brandi Herter5, Diane E. Hoffmann, Michael Holder8, Clinton Howarth1, Katherine H. Huang1, Susan M. Huse26, Jacques Izard2, Janet K. Jansson11, Huaiyang Jiang8, Catherine Jordan7, Vandita Joshi8, James A. Katancik27, Wendy A. Keitel8, Scott T. Kelley28, Cristyn Kells1, Nicholas B. King29, Dan Knights4, Heidi H. Kong13, Omry Koren30, Sergey Koren31, Karthik Kota5, Christie Kovar8, Nikos C. Kyrpides16, Patricio S. La Rosa5, Sandra L. Lee8, Katherine P. Lemon2, Niall J. Lennon1, Cecil M. Lewis32, Lora Lewis8, Ruth E. Ley30, Kelvin Li6, Konstantinos Liolios16, Bo Liu31, Yue Liu8, Chien Chi Lo17, Catherine A. Lozupone4, R. Dwayne Lunsford13, Tessa Madden5, Anup Mahurkar7, Peter J. Mannon33, Elaine R. Mardis5, Victor M. Markowitz16, Victor M. Markowitz11, Konstantinos Mavromatis16, Jamison McCorrison6, Daniel McDonald4, Jean E. McEwen13, Amy L. McGuire8, Pamela McInnes13, Teena Mehta1, Kathie A. Mihindukulasuriya5, Jason R. Miller6, Patrick Minx5, Irene Newsham8, Chad Nusbaum1, Michelle Oglaughlin5, Joshua Orvis7, Ioanna Pagani16, Krishna Palaniappan11, Shital M. Patel8, Matthew D. Pearson1, Jane Peterson13, Mircea Podar34, Craig Pohl5, Katherine S. Pollard12, Mihai Pop31, Margaret Priest1, Lita M. Proctor13, Xiang Qin8, Jeroen Raes21, Jacques Ravel7, Jeffrey G. Reid8, Mina Rho35, Rosamond Rhodes36, Kevin Riehle8, Maria C. Rivera15, Beltran Rodriguez-Mueller28, Yu-Hui Rogers6, Matthew C. Ross8, Carsten Russ1, Ravi Sanka6, Pamela Sankar37, J. Fah Sathirapongsasuti2, Jeffery A. Schloss13, Patrick D. Schloss38, Thomas M. Schmidt39, Matthew B. Scholz17, Lynn M. Schriml7, Alyxandria M. Schubert38, Nicola Segata2, Julia A. Segre13, William D. Shannon5, Richard R. Sharp20, Thomas J. Sharpton12, Narmada Shenoy1, Nihar U. Sheth15, Gina A. Simone, Indresh Singh6, Christopher Smillie10, Jack D. Sobel40, Daniel D. Sommer31, Paul Spicer32, Granger G. Sutton6, Sean M. Sykes1, Diana Tabbaa1, Mathangi Thiagarajan6, Chad Tomlinson5, Manolito Torralba6, Todd J. Treangen41, Rebecca Truty12, Tatiana A. Vishnivetskaya34, Jason Walker5, Lu Wang13, Zhengyuan Wang5, Doyle V. Ward1, Wesley C. Warren5, Mark A. Watson5, Christopher Wellington13, Kris A. Wetterstrand13, James R. White7, Katarzyna Wilczek-Boney8, Yuanqing Wu8, Kristine M. Wylie5, Todd Wylie5, Chandri Yandava1, Liang Ye5, Yuzhen Ye35, Shibu Yooseph6, Bonnie P. Youmans8, Lan Zhang8, Yanjiao Zhou5, Yiming Zhu8, Laurie Zoloth42, Jeremy Zucker1, Bruce W. Birren1, Richard A. Gibbs8, Sarah K. Highlander8, Barbara A. Methé6, Karen E. Nelson6, Joseph F. Petrosino8, George M. Weinstock5, Richard K. Wilson5, Owen White7 
14 Jun 2012-Nature
Abstract: The Human Microbiome Project Consortium reports the first results of their analysis of microbial communities from distinct, clinically relevant body habitats in a human cohort; the insights into the microbial communities of a healthy population lay foundations for future exploration of the epidemiology, ecology and translational applications of the human microbiome.

6,805 citations