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God's Caliph : Religious Authority in the First Centuries of Islam

TL;DR: In this article, the Umayyad conception of the caliphate is discussed, and the title khalifat Allah is given to the prophet of the sunna, which is the basis of the prophetical sunna.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. The title khalifat Allah 3. The Umayyad conception of the caliphate 4. Caliphal law 5. From caliphal to Prophetic sunna 6. Epilogue Appendices Index.
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MonographDOI
Jared Rubin1
01 Feb 2017
TL;DR: Rubin argues that the importance of religious legitimacy in Middle Eastern politics was the primary culprit for the reversal of fortunes of the Middle East economy as mentioned in this paper, arguing that the Church played a weaker role in legitimizing rule in Europe, especially where Protestantism spread.
Abstract: For centuries following the spread of Islam, the Middle East was far ahead of Europe. Yet, the modern economy was born in Europe. Why was it not born in the Middle East? In this book Jared Rubin examines the role that Islam played in this reversal of fortunes. It argues that the religion itself is not to blame; the importance of religious legitimacy in Middle Eastern politics was the primary culprit. Muslim religious authorities were given an important seat at the political bargaining table, which they used to block important advancements such as the printing press and lending at interest. In Europe, however, the Church played a weaker role in legitimizing rule, especially where Protestantism spread (indeed, the Reformation was successful due to the spread of printing, which was blocked in the Middle East). It was precisely in those Protestant nations, especially England and the Dutch Republic, where the modern economy was born.

153 citations

Book
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: The Rise of the New Islamic State (New Islamic State) as discussed by the authors is a story about the Islamic Jihadist movement in the Middle East and North Africa, focusing on the Islamic State.
Abstract: Introduction 1 PART I: What Went Right? 17 PART II: Decline and Fall 57 PART III: The Rise of the New Islamic State 103 Conclusion 147 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 153 NOTES 155 INDEX 177

146 citations

BookDOI
17 Dec 2009
TL;DR: The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy as mentioned in this paper provides a rich and remarkable period in the history of philosophy and will be the authoritative source on medieval philosophy for the next generation of scholars and students alike.
Abstract: The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the rise of the universities and developments in the cultural and linguistic spheres. A striking feature is the continuous coverage of Islamic, Jewish, and Christian material. There are useful biographies of the philosophers, and a comprehensive bibliography. The volumes illuminate a rich and remarkable period in the history of philosophy and will be the authoritative source on medieval philosophy for the next generation of scholars and students alike.

144 citations

Book
Wael B. Hallaq1
16 Apr 2009
TL;DR: Hallaq's Magisterial overview of Shari'a sets the record straight by examining the doctrines and practices of Islamic law within the context of its history, and by showing how it functioned within pre-modern Islamic societies as a moral imperative as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In recent years, Islamic law, or Shari'a, has been appropriated as a tool of modernity in the Muslim world and in the West and has become highly politicised in consequence. Wael Hallaq's magisterial overview of Shari'a sets the record straight by examining the doctrines and practices of Islamic law within the context of its history, and by showing how it functioned within pre-modern Islamic societies as a moral imperative. In so doing, Hallaq takes the reader on an epic journey tracing the history of Islamic law from its beginnings in seventh-century Arabia, through its development and transformation under the Ottomans, and across lands as diverse as India, Africa and South-East Asia, to the present. In a remarkably fluent narrative, the author unravels the complexities of his subject to reveal a love and deep knowledge of the law which will inform, engage and challenge the reader.

137 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule is discussed in this article.
Abstract: From the later third century, Germans whom the literary sources called Franks had joined with other barbarians to challenge Roman rule in Gaul. This chapter acknowledges the importance of the Bishop Gregory's extensive writings in the discussions of the formation of Frankish kingdoms, the working of kingship, the roles of aristocrats and bishops, and the limits of Merovingian rule. The kingdom in north-eastern Gaul was sometimes known simply as 'Francia'. It also came to be known as Austria or Austrasia. Although by the fifth century Orthodox Christianity provided a dominant world-view among the Roman population in Gaul, as the Franks expanded into Gaul they nevertheless retained their pagan cults, and even into the sixth century they continued to worship at pagan shrines, especially in northern Gaul. In the kingdom of Austrasia various combinations of Frankish aristocrats, Roman aristocrats and bishops competed for influence at the royal court.

96 citations