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Journal ArticleDOI

Governing the Dangerous: an Historical Overview of Dangerous Offender Legislation:

01 Mar 1996-Social & Legal Studies (Sage PublicationsSage CA: Thousand Oaks, CA)-Vol. 5, Iss: 1, pp 21-36
TL;DR: A cluster of dangerous offender laws B ~L which were recently introduced into a number of English-speaking societies are discussed in this article. But the authors do not discuss the legal aspects of these laws.
Abstract: HAT IS the significance of the cluster of dangerous offender laws B ~L which were recently introduced into a number of English-speaking societies? These include the Victorian State Sentencing (Amendment) Act 1993 and the Community Protection Act 1990; the Washington State Sexual Predator Law 1989; the Canadian federal legislation of 1993 the Corrections and Conditional Release Act; and the New Zealand Criminal Justice Amendment Act 1993. The laws themselves are united around the following common themes:’ those judged to be ’dangerous’ must be (i) repeat violent/sexual offenders and (ii) be thought likely to commit such crimes again in the future as, for example, in the justification for the Canadian legislation: ’in order for the
Citations
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Book
01 Aug 2003
TL;DR: The role of risk in criminal justice practice and policy is explored in this article, which is a key text on a number of courses at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and is routinely cited in other works including leading journal articles.
Abstract: This is a single authored work in a key Open University series for crime and criminal justice. The book has been extremely well reviewed and is a key text on a number of courses at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It is routinely cited in other works, including leading journal articles. It draws on extensive literature, a wide research base, and the author’s own research. At time of publication it was the first to thoroughly explore the role of risk in criminal justice practice and policy and is recognised as a key authority in the subject.

183 citations

01 Dec 2019

71 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2019

38 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argued that governmentality has a characteristically "programmatic" form, and that it is inextricably bound to the invention and evaluation of technologies that seek to improve government power.
Abstract: This paper proposes some new ways of analysing the exercise of political power in advanced liberal democratic societies These are developed from Michel Foucault's conception of ‘governmentality’ and addresses political power in terms of ‘political rationalities’ and ‘technologies of government’ It draws attention to the diversity of regulatory mechanisms which seek to give effect to government, and to the particular importance of indirect mechanisms that link the conduct of individuals and organizations to political objectives through ‘action at a distance’ The paper argues for the importance of an analysis of language in understanding the constitution of the objects of politics, not simply in terms of meaning or rhetoric, but as ‘intellectual technologies’ that render aspects of existence amenable to inscription and calculation It suggests that governmentality has a characteristically ‘programmatic’ form, and that it is inextricably bound to the invention and evaluation of technologies that seek to g

2,488 citations


"Governing the Dangerous: an Histori..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…the state fades from view: it both presides over these new ways of governing to give them authority (Donzelot, 1979), while still being prepared to intervene should they breakdown or function inadequately - constituting, as it were, a form of ’government at a distance’ (Miller and Rose, 1990)....

    [...]

  • ...(Keat and Abercrombie,1991: 6; see also Miller and Rose, 1990) From the initial traces of this shift in human possibilities that we see in the 1960s, one manifestation of this individualism seems to have become organized around 29 the right to a pleasurable existence....

    [...]

  • ...At that time, they were elements of a welfarist political rationality premised around increased state intervention, not less, as is the case today, when neo-liberalism has become dominant (see Miller and Rose, 1990; O’Malley, 1994)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that an important new language of penology is emerging, which shifts focus away from the traditional concerns of the criminal law and criminology, which have focused on the individual, and redirects it to actuarial consideration of aggregates.
Abstract: The new penology argues that an important new language of penology is emerging. This new language, which has its counterparts in other areas of the law as well, shifts focus away from the traditional concerns of the criminal law and criminology, which have focused on the individual, and redirects it to actuarial consideration of aggregates. This shift has a number of important implications: It facilitates development of a vision or model of a new type of criminal process that embraces increased reliance on imprisonment and that merges concerns for surveillance and custody, that shifts away from a concern with punishing individuals to managing aggregates of dangerous groups, and that affects the training and practice of criminologists.

1,938 citations


"Governing the Dangerous: an Histori..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…clinical description of the individual with an actuarial language of probabilistic calculations and statistical distributions applied to populations’ (Feeley and Simon, 1992: 452) aimed at making the insurance the state still provides to its subjects through the dangerousness laws more efficient....

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MonographDOI
TL;DR: Punishment is a complex social institution that affects both social relations and cultural meanings as discussed by the authors, and it is worth noting that punishment is the heart and soul of criminology, and perhaps of sociology as well.
Abstract: In this path-breaking book, David Garland argues that punishment is a complex social institution that affects both social relations and cultural meanings. Drawing on theorists from Durkheim to Foucault, he insightfully critiques the entire spectrum of social thought concerning punishment, and reworks it into a new interpretive synthesis. ""Punishment and Modern Society" is an outstanding delineation of the sociology of punishment. At last the process that is surely the heart and soul of criminology, and perhaps of sociology as well punishment has been rescued from the fringes of these 'disciplines'. . . . This book is a first-class piece of scholarship." Graeme Newman, "Contemporary Sociology" "Garland's treatment of the theorists he draws upon is erudite, faithful and constructive. . . . "Punishment and Modern Society" is a magnificent example of "working" social theory." John R. Sutton, "American Journal of Sociology" ""Punishment and Modern Society" lifts contemporary penal issues from the mundane and narrow contours within which they are so often discussed and relocates them at the forefront of public policy. . . . This book will become a landmark study." Andrew Rutherford, "Legal Studies" "This is a superbly intelligent study. Its comprehensive coverage makes it a genuine review of the field. Its scholarship and incisiveness of judgment will make it a constant reference work for the initiated, and its concluding theoretical synthesis will make it a challenge and inspiration for those undertaking research and writing on the subject. As a state-of-the-art account it is unlikely to be bettered for many a year." Rod Morgan, "British Journal of Criminology" Winner of both the Outstanding Scholarship Award of the Crime and Delinquency Division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Sociological Association's Crime, Law, and Deviance Section"

1,413 citations

Book
01 May 1980
TL;DR: The Policing of Families as mentioned in this paper examines the role of philanthropy, social work, compulsory mass education, and psychiatry in the contol of family life, and describes the transformation of mothers into agents of the state.
Abstract: In "The Policing of Families", Jacques Donzelot, a student and colleague of Michel Foucault, offers an account of public intervention in the regulation of family affairs since the 18th century, showing how this intervention effected radical changes in the structure of what had traditionally been a private domain. Treating the family as a focal point of a multitude of social practices and discourses, Donzelot examines the role of philanthropy, social work, compulsory mass education, and psychiatry in the contol of family life, and describes the transformation of mothers into agents of the state. Donzelot also provides a critique of Marxist, psychoanalytic and feminist conceptions of the family and shows how the policies of the state and the professions moulded working-class and middle-class families in quite different ways.

1,217 citations


"Governing the Dangerous: an Histori..." refers background in this paper

  • ...I do not mean that, here, the state fades from view: it both presides over these new ways of governing to give them authority (Donzelot, 1979), while still being prepared to intervene should they breakdown or function inadequately - constituting, as it were, a form of ’government at a distance’…...

    [...]

  • ...I do not mean that, here, the state fades from view: it both presides over these new ways of governing to give them authority (Donzelot, 1979), while still being prepared to intervene should they breakdown or function inadequately - constituting, as it were, a form of ’government at a distance’ (Miller and Rose, 1990)....

    [...]

  • ...In western societies as a whole, before the outbreak of war in 1939, there were great fears of population decline and racial extinction (Donzelot, 1979)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI

668 citations


"Governing the Dangerous: an Histori..." refers background in this paper

  • ...As a result, the actuarial methods which have had a central role in other insurance programmes for over a century (Ewald, 1991) begin to replace the dominance of the psychologists....

    [...]

  • ...Furthermore, the growth of mass-market consumerism, particularly post-1950, made property replaceable: the damage suffered was no longer irreparable, again reducing risk (Ewald, 1991: 204)....

    [...]