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MonographDOI

Greek Thought, Arabic Culture: The Graeco-Arabic Translation Movement in Baghdad and Early 'Abbāsid Society (2nd-4th/8th-10th Centuries)

01 Jan 1998-Classical World (Taylor & Francis)-Vol. 94, Iss: 2, pp 215
TL;DR: Gutas as mentioned in this paper explores the major social, political and ideological factors that occasioned the unprecedented translation movement from Greek into Arabic in Baghdad, the newly founded capital of the Arab dynasty of the 'Abbasids', during the first two centuries of their rule.
Abstract: From the middle of the eighth century to the tenth century, almost all non-literary and non-historical secular Greek books, including such diverse topics as astrology, alchemy, physics, botany and medicine, that were not available throughout the eastern Byzantine Empire and the Near East, were translated into Arabic. Greek Thought, Arabic Culture explores the major social, political and ideological factors that occasioned the unprecedented translation movement from Greek into Arabic in Baghdad, the newly founded capital of the Arab dynasty of the 'Abbasids', during the first two centuries of their rule. Dimitri Gutas draws upon the preceding historical and philological scholarship in Greco-Arabic studies and the study of medieval translations of secular Greek works into Arabic and analyses the social and historical reasons for this phenomenon. Dimitri Gutas provides a stimulating, erudite and well-documented survey of this key movement in the transmission of ancient Greek culture to the Middle Ages.
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Book
01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: The authors discusses mycenaean texts and grammata for the Greek language, including the Linear B tablets and the Phoinikēia grammar, as well as other sources of information.
Abstract: Mycenaean texts : the Linear B tablets / Silvia Ferrara -- Phoinikēia grammata : an alphabet for the Greek language / Roger D. Woodard -- Inscriptions / Rudolph Wachter -- Papyri / Arthur Verhoogt -- The manuscript tradition / Niels Gaul -- Phonology / Philomen Probert -- Morphology and word formation / Michael Weiss -- Semantics and vocabulary / Michael Clarke -- Syntax / Evert van Emde Boas and Luuk Huitink -- Pragmatics : speech and text / Egbert J. Bakker -- Greek and Proto-Indo-European / Jeremy Rau -- Mycenaean Greek / Rupert Thompson -- Greek dialects in the archaic and classical ages / Stephen Colvin -- Greek and the languages of Asia Minor to the classical period / Shane Hawkins -- Linguistic diversity in Asia Minor during the Empire : Koine and the non-Greek languages / Claude Brixhe -- Greek in Egypt / Sofia Torallas Tovar -- Jewish and Christian Greek / Coulter H. George -- Greek and Latin bilingualism / Bruno Rochette -- Register variation / Andreas Willi -- Female speech / Thorsten Fogen -- Forms of address and markers of status / Eleanor Dickey -- Technical languages : science and medicine / Francesca Schironi -- Inherited poetics / Joshua T. Katz -- Language and meter / Gregory Nagy -- Literary dialects / Olga Tribulato -- The Greek of epic / Olav Hackstein -- The language of Greek lyric poetry / Michael Silk -- The Greek of Athenian tragedy / Richard Rutherford -- Kunstprosa : philosophy, history, oratory / Victor Bers -- The literary heritage as language : Atticism and second sophistic / Lawrence Kim -- Greek philosophers on language / Casper C. de Jonge and Johannes M. van Ophuijsen -- The birth of grammar in Greece / Andreas U. Schmidhauser -- Language as a system in ancient rhetoric and grammar / James I. Porter -- Byzantine literature and the classical past / Staffan Wahlgren -- Medieval and early modern Greek / David Holton and Io Manolessou -- Modern Greek / Peter Mackridge.

171 citations


Cites background from "Greek Thought, Arabic Culture: The ..."

  • ...They were to play a vital role in the discursive construction of orthodoxy on the one hand (Mango 1991) and of ‘Abbāsid, anti-Byzantine “Hellenism” on the other (Gutas 1998)....

    [...]

  • ...In order to exploit the glory of the past and to maintain imperial splendor, the Byzantine elite consciously revived ancient learning (henceforth, paideia) (Gutas 1998: 175–86)....

    [...]

Book
Jürgen Renn1
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: Second-order knowledge as mentioned in this paper is the origin of self-organizing, self-promoting qualities of knowledge, and it is the reflexivity of knowledge that accounts for its selforganizing and self-defining qualities.
Abstract: object but always involves knowledge about this knowledge as well, that is, meta or second-order knowledge. This reflexivity of knowledge also accounts for its self-organizing, self-promoting qualities. Second-order knowledge is the origin 22

160 citations

Book
31 Mar 2016
TL;DR: The first study to systematically confront the question of how Brahmanism transformed itself and spread all over South and Southeast Asia is as discussed by the authors, focusing on the formative period of this phenomenon, roughly between Alexander and the Guptas.
Abstract: This is the first study to systematically confront the question how Brahmanism, which was geographically limited and under threat during the final centuries BCE, transformed itself and spread all over South and Southeast Asia. Brahmanism spread over this vast area without the support of an empire, without the help of conquering armies, and without the intermediary of religious missionaries. This phenomenon has no parallel in world history, yet shaped a major portion of the surface of the earth for a number of centuries. This book focuses on the formative period of this phenomenon, roughly between Alexander and the Guptas.

158 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that IR should be re-grounded in its own disciplinary problematique: the consequences of (societal) multiplicity, and show how this regrounding unlocks the trans-disciplinary potential of IR.
Abstract: In recent decades, the discipline of International Relations has experienced both dramatic institutional growth and unprecedented intellectual enrichment. And yet, unlike neighbouring disciplines such as Geography, Sociology, History and Comparative Literature, it has still not generated any ‘big ideas’ that have impacted across the human sciences. Why is this? And what can be done about it? This article provides an answer in three steps. First, it traces the problem to IR’s enduring definition as a subfield of Political Science. Second, it argues that IR should be re-grounded in its own disciplinary problematique: the consequences of (societal) multiplicity. And finally, it shows how this re-grounding unlocks the trans-disciplinary potential of IR. Specifically, ‘uneven and combined development’ provides an example of an IR ‘big idea’ that could travel to other disciplines: for by operationalizing the consequences of multiplicity, it reveals the causal and constitutive significance of ‘the international’ for the social world as a whole.

155 citations

BookDOI
17 Dec 2009
TL;DR: The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy as mentioned in this paper provides a rich and remarkable period in the history of philosophy and will be the authoritative source on medieval philosophy for the next generation of scholars and students alike.
Abstract: The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the rise of the universities and developments in the cultural and linguistic spheres. A striking feature is the continuous coverage of Islamic, Jewish, and Christian material. There are useful biographies of the philosophers, and a comprehensive bibliography. The volumes illuminate a rich and remarkable period in the history of philosophy and will be the authoritative source on medieval philosophy for the next generation of scholars and students alike.

144 citations