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…ha perdut la veu: Some reflections on the composition of e-literature as a minor literature

11 Jun 2011-Journal of Writing in Creative Practice (Intellect)-Vol. 4, Iss: 1, pp 53-63
TL;DR: In this paper, an extended version of a paper I gave at Kingston University as an invited speaker at the 'From Page to Screen to Augmented Reality' Conference in July 2010 is presented.
Abstract: This article is an extended version of a paper I gave at Kingston University as an invited speaker at the 'From Page to Screen to Augmented Reality' Conference in July 2010. The paper begins from a discussion of a digital text work of my own, entitled …ha perdut la veu. This is a bilingual text work in English and Catalan, and was first shown at the E-poetry conference at the University of Barcelona, May 2009. The text is drawn partly from the translation into Catalan of one of my early children’s novels, La Freda ha perdut la veu. (Alfreda Abbot's Lost Voice OUP), hence the title of the piece. The English text is taken from a translation of Deleuze and Guattari’s Kafka: Towards a Minor Literature. Translation is being used here for its explanatory force in relation to both digital text and performance writing. The paper has two objectives. The first is to give a clear example of the way in which practice and theory, or rather practice-as-research, can exist as a symbiotic relationship – each benefiting and illuminating the other. The second is to propose and map out an area of potential further research into the discursive positioning of electronic literature/digital writing within Deleuze and Guattari’s notion of minorisation as articulated by Jean-Jacques Lecercle in his book, Deleuze and Style. The conference itself was organised by Dr Maria Mencia and the keynote was given by Jay David Bolter, Wesley Chair of New Media and a professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is the author among other things of Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print, a highly influential critical text of electronic literature.
Citations
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01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors encourage contributors to enter items of critical writing to indicate what creative works of electronic literature the critical writing discusses, and cross-references are then automatically displayed on both the record for critical writing and for the creative work.
Abstract: in English) (Text) Abstract (in original language) (Text)in original language) (Text) Language of abstract (Structured Taxonomy) Other language version (Node reference to Critical Writing) (Multiple) Pull Quotes (Text) (Multiple) References and Attachments Creative Works referenced (Node reference to Creative Work) (Multiple) We encourage contributors entering items of critical writing to indicate what creative works of electronic literature the critical writing discusses. Cross-references are then automatically displayed on both the record for the critical writing and for the creative work. Critical Writing referenced (Node reference to Critical Writing) (Multiple) critical writing comments substantively on another. Event referenced (Node reference to Event) (Multiple) Organization referenced (Node reference to Organization) (Multiple) Publisher referenced (Node reference to Publisher) (Multiple) Database or Archive referenced (Node reference to Database or Archive) (Multiple)

28 citations

01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: A paper on digital (or electronic) literature, which aims at conceiving and realizing works which are specific to the computer and the digital medium by trying to exploit their characteristics: hypertext technology, multimedia dimension, interactivity...
Abstract: Why a paper on digital (or electronic) literature? Writers who are recognized as print writers, such as the French novelist François Bon,1 have been experimenting new literary forms on the Internet. In some respects, the Internet appears as an artistic laboratory or as a vast creative workshop.2 However, literary creation with and for the computer was not born with the Internet; it has been around for several decades. “Digital literature”, “electronic literature”, or even “cyberliterature”: the terminology is not fixed.3 Its authors aim at conceiving and realizing works which are specific to the computer and the digital medium by trying to exploit their characteristics: hypertext technology, multimedia dimension, interactivity... The productions of digital literature were of course not born ex nihilo. Genealogy lines can be traced which are acknowledged by the authors themselves: combinatorial writing and constrained writing, fragmentary writing, sound and visual writing.

6 citations


Cites background from "…ha perdut la veu: Some reflections..."

  • ...For the reader, this is an “improvised performance” (Fletcher, 2011) insofar as it progressively uncovers the texts but also its location on the screen....

    [...]

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) project as discussed by the authors was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP.
Abstract: Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP for Creativity and Innovation. ELMCIP involved seven European academic research partners and one non-academic partner who investigated how creative communities of practitioners form within a transnational and transcultural context in a globalized and distributed communication environment. Focusing on the electronic literature community in Europe as a model of networked creativity and innovation in practice, ELMCIP intended both to study the formation and interactions of that community and also to further electronic literature research and practice in Europe.

4 citations

References
More filters
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors encourage contributors to enter items of critical writing to indicate what creative works of electronic literature the critical writing discusses, and cross-references are then automatically displayed on both the record for critical writing and for the creative work.
Abstract: in English) (Text) Abstract (in original language) (Text)in original language) (Text) Language of abstract (Structured Taxonomy) Other language version (Node reference to Critical Writing) (Multiple) Pull Quotes (Text) (Multiple) References and Attachments Creative Works referenced (Node reference to Creative Work) (Multiple) We encourage contributors entering items of critical writing to indicate what creative works of electronic literature the critical writing discusses. Cross-references are then automatically displayed on both the record for the critical writing and for the creative work. Critical Writing referenced (Node reference to Critical Writing) (Multiple) critical writing comments substantively on another. Event referenced (Node reference to Event) (Multiple) Organization referenced (Node reference to Organization) (Multiple) Publisher referenced (Node reference to Publisher) (Multiple) Database or Archive referenced (Node reference to Database or Archive) (Multiple)

28 citations

Book
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) project as mentioned in this paper was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP.
Abstract: Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP for Creativity and Innovation. ELMCIP involved seven European academic research partners and one non-academic partner who investigated how creative communities of practitioners form within a transnational and transcultural context in a globalized and distributed communication environment. Focusing on the electronic literature community in Europe as a model of networked creativity and innovation in practice, ELMCIP intended both to study the formation and interactions of that community and also to further electronic literature research and practice in Europe.

8 citations

01 Jan 2017
TL;DR: A paper on digital (or electronic) literature, which aims at conceiving and realizing works which are specific to the computer and the digital medium by trying to exploit their characteristics: hypertext technology, multimedia dimension, interactivity...
Abstract: Why a paper on digital (or electronic) literature? Writers who are recognized as print writers, such as the French novelist François Bon,1 have been experimenting new literary forms on the Internet. In some respects, the Internet appears as an artistic laboratory or as a vast creative workshop.2 However, literary creation with and for the computer was not born with the Internet; it has been around for several decades. “Digital literature”, “electronic literature”, or even “cyberliterature”: the terminology is not fixed.3 Its authors aim at conceiving and realizing works which are specific to the computer and the digital medium by trying to exploit their characteristics: hypertext technology, multimedia dimension, interactivity... The productions of digital literature were of course not born ex nihilo. Genealogy lines can be traced which are acknowledged by the authors themselves: combinatorial writing and constrained writing, fragmentary writing, sound and visual writing.

6 citations