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DissertationDOI

Handheld technologies and their role in supporting distance-learning study

TL;DR: The study showed that handheld technologies can be used to support students for a number of different purposes: to provide an additional informal means of communication with staff and other students; to prompt participation oraction; to suggest resources or personalise the support for students, and to enable access to advice and guidance.
Abstract: Distance education institutions have always employed a variety of technological media, and developing technologies are incorporated into the learning blend as their advantages are identified. Modern distance learning has, therefore, become linked implicitly with the latest media and handheld communication technologies are now being used to communicate with members of the educational community, share information and resources, and enable investigation, discussion and learning. The use of similar mobile technologies for the purposes of student support is under-represented in the literature. This action research study explored the limitations and benefits of handheld technologies for supporting distance learning students, and the drivers and barriers that might affect their use by students. The literature review helped to identify the attributes and limitations of m-learning and handheld technologies, and the aspects of student support that might be enabled through mobile options. The research design included a questionnaire, a year-long study in which associate lecturers developed mobile-accessible resources to use with their students, and interviews with study support experts. The research data was collected in a UK distance education institution. The study showed that handheld technologies can be used to support students for a number of different purposes: to provide an additional informal means of communication with staff and other students; to prompt participation oraction; to suggest resources or personalise the support for students; to enable access to advice and guidance; to offer factual information for study and administrative purposes; to encourage revision and review of learning.The research also suggested that students felt that increased group cohesion was promoted within the learning community through using their personal mobile technologies within the student support framework. A model of this potential method of support is presented, giving examples of the types of communications, resources and services that could be implemented within a distance education institution.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This theoretically hybrid, statistically significant, and culturally sensitive book achieves a sustained sociological understanding of the cell phone in a global context through an important study spanning three continents, and asking fundamental questions about the social effects of wireless communication.
Abstract: Castells, M., Fernandez-Ardevol, M., Qiu, J. L., & Sey, A. (2007). Mobile communication and society: A global perspective. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. This theoretically hybrid, statistically sig...

535 citations

Journal Article

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors may not be able to make you love reading, but delivering learning on the net will lead you to love reading starting from now and this will give you the kindness.
Abstract: We may not be able to make you love reading, but delivering learning on the net will lead you to love reading starting from now. Book is the window to open the new world. The world that you want is in the better stage and level. World will always guide you to even the prestige stage of the life. You know, this is some of how reading will give you the kindness. In this case, more books you read more knowledge you know, but it can mean also the bore is full.

18 citations

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: This book helps students make the most of their distance learning experience by preparing for the task ahead and knowing yourself as a learner.
Abstract: Foreword by Phil Race Introduction Preparing for the task ahead Know yourself as a learner E-learning Practicalities of studying Getting support Making the most of your distance learning experience Resources for studying Doing your research project Course specific information References Appendix Index.

9 citations

01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors introduce the concept of studying at a distance, which is a way in which students can study at their own pace in their own time, in a way that can result in feelings of isolation because they are removed physically from the institution, lecturers and peers.
Abstract: Distance education is a way in which students can study at their own pace in their own time. Successful distance students need to be self-directed and autonomous learners because they have control over their studies. However, it is this autonomy that can result in feelings of isolation because the student is removed physically from the institution, the lecturers and peers. The evolution of distance learning has kept abreast of technological advances as well as the development of teaching and learning theories and practice, making education even more accessible to more people. As the use of distance components are added to so-called contact learning to create 'blended' programmes, distance education is becoming more common place. It is for these reasons that 'Studying at a distance' by Christine Talbot can be regarded as a timely addition to the literature.

4 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Taxonomy of Educational Objectives as discussed by the authors is a taxonomy of educational objectives that is based on the concepts of knowledge, specificity, and problems of objectives, and is used in our taxonomy.
Abstract: List of Tables and Figures. Preface. Foreword. SECTION I: THE TAXONOMY, EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES AND STUDENT LEARNING. 1. Introduction. 2. The Structure, Specificity, and Problems of Objectives. SECTION II: THE REVISED TAXONOMY STRUCTURE. 3. The Taxonomy Table. 4. The Knowledge Dimension. 5. The Cognitive Process Dimension. SECTION III: THE TAXONOMY IN USE. 6. Using the Taxonomy Table. 7. Introduction to the Vignettes. 8. Nutrition Vignette. 9. Macbeth Vignette. 10. Addition Facts Vignette. 11. Parliamentary Acts Vignette. 12. Volcanoes? Here? Vignette. 13. Report Writing Vignette. 14. Addressing Long-standing Problems in Classroom Instruction. APPENDICES. Appendix A: Summary of the Changes from the Original Framework. Appendix B: Condensed Version of the Original Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domain. References. Credits. Index.

9,708 citations

Book
27 Apr 2006
TL;DR: This chapter discusses social research methods, research strategies and design, and how to get the most out of Lectures and revision skills.
Abstract: PART ONE: SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS Introduction to Your Companion PART TWO: CORE AREAS OF THE CURRICULUM Theoretical Background Research Basics Research Strategies and Design The Nature of Data Defining the Research Problem Sampling Data Collection Methods Experimental Design Quantitative Data Analysis Qualitative Data Analysis Ethics PART THREE: STUDY AND REVISION SKILLS How To Get the Most Out of Your Lectures - (written in collaboration with David McIlroy) How To Make the Most of Seminars Revision Hints and Tips Exam Tips Tips on Interpreting Essay and Exam Questions Essay Writing Writing a Literature Review Writing a Research Proposal Writing Up a Dissertation or Research Project

6,824 citations

Book
21 Dec 1999
TL;DR: This step-by-step guide provides answers to all the questions students ask when beginning their first research project, and demonstrates how to learn the craft of qualitative research by applying knowledge about different methodologies to actual data.
Abstract: Written in a lively, accessible style, this step-by-step guide provides answers to all the questions students ask when beginning their first research project David Silverman demonstrates how to learn the craft of qualitative research by applying knowledge about different methodologies to actual data He provides practical advice on key issues, such as: defining `originality' and narrowing down a topic; keeping a research diary and writing a research report; and presenting research to different audiences Packed with case studies and examples of students' experiences, the book has many features to aid study, including overviews, summaries of key skills and a glossary of terms Each stage in the research process is grounded in worked examples, with exercises designed both to test students' knowledge and to encourage the development of practical skills

6,597 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is proposed that a more measured and disinterested approach is now required to investigate ‘digital natives’ and their implications for education and it is argued that rather than being empirical and theoretically informed, the debate can be likened to an academic form of a ‘moral panic’.
Abstract: The idea that a new generation of students is entering the education system has excited recent attention among educators and education commentators. Termed ‘digital natives’ or the ‘Net generation’, these young people are said to have been immersed in technology all their lives, imbuing them with sophisticated technical skills and learning preferences for which traditional education is unprepared. Grand claims are being made about the nature of this generational change and about the urgent necessity for educational reform in response. A sense of impending crisis pervades this debate. However, the actual situation is far from clear. In this paper, the authors draw on the fields of education and sociology to analyse the digital natives debate. The paper presents and questions the main claims made about digital natives and analyses the nature of the debate itself. We argue that rather than being empirically and theoretically informed, the debate can be likened to an academic form of a ‘moral panic’. We propose that a more measured and disinterested approach is now required to investigate ‘digital natives’ and their implications for education.

2,711 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Kuh et al. as discussed by the authors used the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) to identify a set of higher performing baccalaureate-granting institutions and identified six properties and conditions common at each of the 20 colleges and universities.
Abstract: Student Success in College: Creating Conditions that Matter, by George D. Kuh, Jillian Kinzie, John H. Schuh, Elizabeth J. Whitt, and Associates. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2005. ISBN 0787982202. Student Success in College: Creating Conditions that Matter by George D. Kuh, Jillian Kinzie, John H. Schuh, Elizabeth J. Whitt, and associates addresses the long-standing issue of the utility of theory and research to professional practice. They address this important issue by asking what properties and conditions are common to those colleges and universities that achieve higher than predicted levels of student engagement and graduation. Put differently, the documentation of effective educational practice constituted the aim of their research project. Accordingly, they named this Project DEEP (Documenting Effective Educational Practices). Through the pursuit of this question and the effective educational practices it richly documents, this book makes an important contribution to practice and clearly demonstrates the usefulness of research to practice. For the community of scholars organized around the study of higher education, the contribution of this volume lies in its heuristic value to theory development and further research. This yolume consists of four parts and 14 chapters. Part 1 includes an introductory chapter that describes the methodology used to identify a set of higher performing baccalaureate-granting institutions. From this set of collegiate institutions, the Project DEEP team selected a diverse set of 20 colleges and universities: research universities, liberal arts colleges, and residential and commuter institutions. Kuh and his colleagues assert that effective educational practices can be found at a wide variety of colleges and universities. The DEEP research team conducted two visits to the campuses of the 20 selected colleges and universities, during which they reviewed documents, visited classrooms and laboratories, observed faculty and staff meetings, and talked with more than 2,700 people. Appendix A of the volume describes in greater detail the research methods used. Through the campus visits and review of pertinent documents, the DEEP research team identified six properties and conditions common at each of the 20 colleges and universities. Part 2 of this volume includes six chapters (chapters 2 through 7), each of which is devoted to one of the six attributes that foster student success. These six chapters extensively describe the focal properties and conditions used by DEEP colleges and universities. Such extensive descriptions facilitate their application by other colleges and universities. The following titles of these six properties and conditions give a general sense of their essence: "Living Mission and 'Lived' Educational Philosophy," "An Unshakable Focus on Student Learning," "Environments Adapted for Educational Enrichment," "Clear Pathways to Student Success," "An Improvement-Oriented Ethos," and "Shared Responsibility for Educational Quality and Student Success." Higher education practitioners will find the contents of these six chapters immensely valuable to practice. Part 3 of this volume consists of five chapters, a chapter devoted to each of the five clusters of effective educational practices that the DEEP team used to identify the 20 overperforming colleges and universities: academic challenge, active and collaborative learning, student-faculty interaction, enriching educational experiences, and supportive campus environments. The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) encompasses each of these five clusters. These five chapters describe the policies and practices of the DEEP colleges and universities reflective of the focal cluster of educational practice. Higher education practitioners will also find the polices and practices described in each of these five chapters useful and worthy of possible implementation by their college or university. …

1,587 citations