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Journal ArticleDOI

Hepatoprotective effect of amoora rohituka

01 Dec 1997-Vol. 35, Iss: 5, pp 318-322

TL;DR: Antihepatotoxic activity of a resuspended residue of the alcohol extract of Amoora rohituka W & A. ro hituka W was studied in rats with hepatic injury induced by carbon tetrachloride and changes in the histological architecture of the liver produced by CC14 where also protected by the administration of A.rohituka suspension.

AbstractAntihepatotoxic activity of a resuspended residue of the alcohol extract of Amoora rohituka W & A. (Meliaceae) was studied in rats with hepatic injury induced by carbon tetrachloride. Carbon tetrachloride (1 ml/kg, i.p.) was administered twice a week for 3 weeks and an extract of A. rohituka (50 mg/kg/day) was given orally for the same period. The rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last CC14 challenge. Carbon tetrachloride induced elevations of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (CPT), alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total plasma bilirubin concentration as well as depression of total plasma cholesterol concentration were reduced significantly by the concurrent treatment of rats with A. rohituka suspension. Changes in the histological architecture of the liver produced by CC14 where also protected by the administration of A. rohituka suspension. These results i...

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The optimum intraperitoneal dose of CCl(4) was found to be 2 ml/kg body weight (dissolved in an equal volume of olive oil), and this increased the level of bilirubin and the activity of the three enzymes significantly, without causing death of the animals.
Abstract: Introduction : The purpose of this study was to optimize carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in the rat with respect to dose, route of injection, and time course. Methods : Male Wistar albino rats, 4 to 6 weeks old and weighing 130–180 g were used. Hepatotoxicity was evaluated by measuring the activity of serum enzymes (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], alanine aminotransferase [ALT], and aspartate aminotransferase [AST]) as well as serum total bilirubin level. Results : Intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) increased the activity of ALP (from 64.9 to 137.3 U/l), ALT (from 106.6 to 693.1 U/l), and AST (from 113.8 to 693.9 U/l). Plasma bilirubin level increased (from 0.119 to 0.42 mg/dl). In contrast, subcutaneous injection of CCl 4 had no effect on these variables. The optimum intraperitoneal dose of CCl 4 was found to be 2 ml/kg body weight (dissolved in an equal volume of olive oil), and this increased the level of bilirubin and the activity of the three enzymes significantly, without causing death of the animals. Hepatotoxicity was observed within 2 h of intraperitoneal injection of CCl 4 and reached a peak after 24 h. Bilirubin level and serum enzyme activities declined gradually to normal levels by 3 days after CCl 4 injection. Conclusion : It is possible to reliably evoke reversible hepatotoxicity in rats by intraperitoneal injection of 2 ml/kg CCl 4 .

58 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An attempt has been made through this article to review the most potential medicinal plants with pharmacologically established hepatoprotective activity and finds the effective leads from natural resources for the desired therapeutic benefit.
Abstract: Background: Several lead compounds have been developed from natural resources as hepatoprotective. The hepatotoxic nature of the drugs, industrial toxins and drug-induced hepatotoxicity has been recognized as the major problem associated with liver diseases. Natural products including herbs have great potential in treating liver disorders. Objective: Botanicals have been used traditionally by herbalists and indigenous healers worldwide for several years for the prevention and treatment of liver disease and clinical research in this century has confirmed the efficacy of several plants in the treatment of liver disease. Many herbs used in several systems of alternative medicines have a long history of traditional use in revitalizing the liver and treating liver dysfunction and disease. Many of these herbs have been evaluated in clinical studies and are now being investigated phytochemically to understand their actions in a better way. Conclusion: An attempt has been made through this article to review the m...

22 citations


Cites background from "Hepatoprotective effect of amoora r..."

  • ...Caffeic acid [17] Isoquercitrin [18] Quercetin [14]...

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  • ...Changes in the histological architecture of the liver and serum biochemical parameters produced by CCl4 indicated hepatoprotective action [17]....

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Journal Article
Abstract: Many plants possess antioxidant ingredients that provided efficacy by additive or synergistic activities. Present article highlights an antioxidant activity of a red listed medicinal plant Aphanamixis polystachya bark which has a strong astringent power. It is used for the treatment of rheumatism, tumours, liver and spleen diseases. Antioxidant activity of the crude extracts of A. polystachya (bark) were assessed using DPPH and FRAP assays. The alcohol, aqueous methanol and petroleum ether extracts exhibited potent antioxidant activity compared to known antioxidants. Due to its natural origin and potent free-radical scavenging ability A. Polystachya could be used as a potential preventive action taken to improve free radical-mediated diseases.

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Wen-Hui Xu1, Xiao-Min Su1, Chao Wang1, Fan Du1, Qian Liang1 
TL;DR: The present review may provide useful evidence for reasonable utilization of Amoora species as folk medicines and further research in drug discovery.
Abstract: The genus Amoora belongs to the Meliaceae family comprising approximately 25–30 species. Many Amoora species have been used as folk medicines for the treatment of many diseases. This review focuses on diverse chemical constituents from Amoora species as well as significant pharmacological activities. Up to now, a total of 140 compounds including eight sesquiterpenoids, twenty-six diterpenoids, forty-two triterpenoids, twenty-two limonoids, seven steroids, seven alkaloids, seven rocaglamide derivatives, four flavonoids, four glycosides, two coumarins, nine phenols, and two organic acids and esters were reported from Amoora species. Triterpenoids are characteristic components for Amoora species. The extracts and chemical constituents of Amoora species exhibit a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities including cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antifungal activity. The present review may provide useful evidence for reasonable utilization of Amoora species as folk medicines and further research in drug discovery.

4 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Herbal powder reversed the deleterious effects of CCl4 and the enzymes were found to be near normal, demonstrating the protective nature of herbal powder against CCl 4 induced liver damage.
Abstract: The present study deals with the effect of herbal powder of Vernonia cinerea and Cuminum cyminum on tissue defense system against CCl4 (carbon tetrachloride) induced hepatic injury in rats. CCl4 diluted with liquid paraffin oil (1:1 ratio) in a dose of 1ml / kg body wt was given intraperitoneally for 2 days. Herbal powder as a suspension of water (10mg / 100g body wt / day) was administered orally for 15 days to rats intoxicated with CCl4. Induction with CCl4 resulted in an increase in the levels of aspartate transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminases and total bilirubin in serum. Post treatment with herbal powder reversed the deleterious effects of CCl4 and the enzymes were found to be near normal. These findings demonstrate the protective nature of herbal powder against CCl4 induced liver damage.

4 citations


References
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Journal Article
TL;DR: Procedures are described for measuring protein in solution or after precipitation with acids or other agents, and for the determination of as little as 0.2 gamma of protein.
Abstract: Since 1922 when Wu proposed the use of the Folin phenol reagent for the measurement of proteins, a number of modified analytical procedures utilizing this reagent have been reported for the determination of proteins in serum, in antigen-antibody precipitates, and in insulin. Although the reagent would seem to be recommended by its great sensitivity and the simplicity of procedure possible with its use, it has not found great favor for general biochemical purposes. In the belief that this reagent, nevertheless, has considerable merit for certain application, but that its peculiarities and limitations need to be understood for its fullest exploitation, it has been studied with regard to effects of variations in pH, time of reaction, and concentration of reactants, permissible levels of reagents commonly used in handling proteins, and interfering substances. Procedures are described for measuring protein in solution or after precipitation with acids or other agents, and for the determination of as little as 0.2 gamma of protein.

285,427 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Precision and reproducibility are demonstrated as well as the absorption characteristics of the purple color produced through the spectral range of 400 to 700 mμ.
Abstract: A direct method for the quantitative determination of total serum cholesterol is described. The procedure consists of adding a reagent containing sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and ferric chloride to a 0.1 ml. sample of serum. The sensitivity achieved is several times that of current procedures and the time required for a single determination is in the order of minutes. Precision and reproducibility are demonstrated as well as the absorption characteristics of the purple color produced through the spectral range of 400 to 700 mμ. Finally, the method is compared with samples in which total cholesterol is determined by the Kingsley-Schaffert and Schoenheimer-Sperry procedures.

2,447 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: 1. Homogenates of guinea-pig polymorphonuclear leucocytes were separated by differential centrifugation into six particulate fractions and a soluble fraction. 2. The distributions in these fractions of protein, DNA, succinate dehydrogenase, beta-glucuronidase, peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase (against p-nitrophenyl phosphate and beta-glycerophosphate), cathepsin, and catalase were compared. 3. Almost all of the DNA sedimented in the first two pellets, indicating that the nuclei were relatively intact. 4. The four hydrolases and peroxidase showed different distribution patterns, although these activities were previously reported to be localized mainly in the single ;granule' fraction isolated from leucocytes. 5. The particles containing peroxidase, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase all exhibited latency. Maximum activity for each enzyme was obtained at roughly similar concentrations of Triton X-100. 6. The acid phosphatase of these cells was distributed between two populations of particles that differed in both sedimentation characteristics and density. The acid phosphatase(s) of the two populations showed slightly different substrate specificities. This bimodal distribution was not an artifact of the procedure used to elicit the cells. 7. Catalase was recovered almost entirely in the soluble fraction and showed no latency in freshly prepared homogenates. No urate oxidase was detected. 8. We conclude that the ;granule' fraction of the polymorphonuclear leucocyte, as isolated by previous workers, contains at least three, probably more, populations of particles with different enzyme contents, and that these cells probably do not contain peroxisomes.

229 citations