scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

High-impedance electromagnetic surfaces with a forbidden frequency band

TL;DR: In this paper, a new type of metallic structure has been developed that is characterized by having high surface impedance, which is analogous to a corrugated metal surface in which the corrugations have been folded up into lumped-circuit elements and distributed in a two-dimensional lattice.
Abstract: A new type of metallic electromagnetic structure has been developed that is characterized by having high surface impedance. Although it is made of continuous metal, and conducts dc currents, it does not conduct ac currents within a forbidden frequency band. Unlike normal conductors, this new surface does not support propagating surface waves, and its image currents are not phase reversed. The geometry is analogous to a corrugated metal surface in which the corrugations have been folded up into lumped-circuit elements, and distributed in a two-dimensional lattice. The surface can be described using solid-state band theory concepts, even though the periodicity is much less than the free-space wavelength. This unique material is applicable to a variety of electromagnetic problems, including new kinds of low-profile antennas.

Content maybe subject to copyright    Report

Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI

[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a general framework for coupling matrix for Coupled Resonator Filters with short-circuited Stubs (UWB) and Cascaded Quadruplet (CQ) filters.
Abstract: Preface to the Second Edition. Preface to the First Edition. 1 Introduction. 2 Network Analysis. 2.1 Network Variables. 2.2 Scattering Parameters. 2.3 Short-Circuit Admittance Parameters. 2.4 Open-Circuit Impedance Parameters. 2.5 ABCD Parameters. 2.6 Transmission-Line Networks. 2.7 Network Connections. 2.8 Network Parameter Conversions. 2.9 Symmetrical Network Analysis. 2.10 Multiport Networks. 2.11 Equivalent and Dual Network. 2.12 Multimode Networks. 3 Basic Concepts and Theories of Filters. 3.1 Transfer Functions. 3.2 Lowpass Prototype Filters and Elements. 3.3 Frequency and Element Transformations. 3.4 Immittance Inverters. 3.5 Richards' Transformation and Kuroda Identities. 3.6 Dissipation and Unloaded Quality Factor. 4 Transmission Lines and Components. 4.1 Microstrip Lines. 4.2 Coupled Lines. 4.3 Discontinuities and Components. 4.4 Other Types of Microstrip Lines. 4.5 Coplanar Waveguide (CPW). 4.6 Slotlines. 5 Lowpass and Bandpass Filters. 5.1 Lowpass Filters. 5.2 Bandpass Filters. 6 Highpass and Bandstop Filters. 6.1 Highpass Filters. 6.2 Bandstop Filters. 7 Coupled-Resonator Circuits. 7.1 General Coupling Matrix for Coupled-Resonator Filters. 7.2 General Theory of Couplings. 7.3 General Formulation for Extracting Coupling Coefficient k. 7.4 Formulation for Extracting External Quality Factor Qe. 7.5 Numerical Examples. 7.6 General Coupling Matrix Including Source and Load. 8 CAD for Low-Cost and High-Volume Production. 8.1 Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Tools. 8.2 Computer-Aided Analysis (CAA). 8.3 Filter Synthesis by Optimization. 8.4 CAD Examples. 9 Advanced RF/Microwave Filters. 9.1 Selective Filters with a Single Pair of Transmission Zeros. 9.2 Cascaded Quadruplet (CQ) Filters. 9.3 Trisection and Cascaded Trisection (CT) Filters. 9.4 Advanced Filters with Transmission-Line Inserted Inverters. 9.5 Linear-Phase Filters. 9.6 Extracted Pole Filters. 9.7 Canonical Filters. 9.8 Multiband Filters. 10 Compact Filters and Filter Miniaturization. 10.1 Miniature Open-Loop and Hairpin Resonator Filters. 10.2 Slow-Wave Resonator Filters. 10.3 Miniature Dual-Mode Resonator Filters. 10.4 Lumped-Element Filters. 10.5 Miniature Filters Using High Dielectric-Constant Substrates. 10.6 Multilayer Filters. 11 Superconducting Filters. 11.1 High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Materials. 11.2 HTS Filters for Mobile Communications. 11.3 HTS Filters for Satellite Communications. 11.4 HTS Filters for Radio Astronomy and Radar. 11.5 High-Power HTS Filters. 11.6 Cryogenic Package. 12 Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Filters. 12.1 UWB Filters with Short-Circuited Stubs. 12.2 UWB-Coupled Resonator Filters. 12.3 Quasilumped Element UWB Filters. 12.4 UWB Filters Using Cascaded Miniature High- And Lowpass Filters. 12.5 UWB Filters with Notch Band(s). 13 Tunable and Reconfigurable Filters. 13.1 Tunable Combline Filters. 13.2 Tunable Open-Loop Filters without Via-Hole Grounding. 13.3 Reconfigurable Dual-Mode Bandpass Filters. 13.4 Wideband Filters with Reconfigurable Bandwidth. 13.5 Reconfigurable UWB Filters. 13.6 RF MEMS Reconfigurable Filters. 13.7 Piezoelectric Transducer Tunable Filters. 13.8 Ferroelectric Tunable Filters. Appendix: Useful Constants and Data. A.1 Physical Constants. A.2 Conductivity of Metals at 25 C (298K). A.3 Electical Resistivity rho in 10-8 m of Metals. A.4 Properties of Dielectric Substrates. Index.

4,774 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 Mar 2013-Science
TL;DR: Progress in the optics of metasurfaces is reviewed and promising applications for surface-confined planar photonics components are discussed and the studies of new, low-loss, tunable plasmonic materials—such as transparent conducting oxides and intermetallics—that can be used as building blocks for metAsurfaces will complement the exploration of smart designs and advanced switching capabilities.
Abstract: Metamaterials, or engineered materials with rationally designed, subwavelength-scale building blocks, allow us to control the behavior of physical fields in optical, microwave, radio, acoustic, heat transfer, and other applications with flexibility and performance that are unattainable with naturally available materials. In turn, metasurfaces-planar, ultrathin metamaterials-extend these capabilities even further. Optical metasurfaces offer the fascinating possibility of controlling light with surface-confined, flat components. In the planar photonics concept, it is the reduced dimensionality of the optical metasurfaces that enables new physics and, therefore, leads to functionalities and applications that are distinctly different from those achievable with bulk, multilayer metamaterials. Here, we review the progress in developing optical metasurfaces that has occurred over the past few years with an eye toward the promising future directions in the field.

2,562 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This Review presents a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index met amaterials and anisotropic metammaterials, and discusses current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics.
Abstract: The ideal material for nanophotonic applications will have a large refractive index at optical frequencies, respond to both the electric and magnetic fields of light, support large optical chirality and anisotropy, confine and guide light at the nanoscale, and be able to modify the phase and amplitude of incoming radiation in a fraction of a wavelength. Artificial electromagnetic media, or metamaterials, based on metallic or polar dielectric nanostructures can provide many of these properties by coupling light to free electrons (plasmons) or phonons (phonon polaritons), respectively, but at the inevitable cost of significant energy dissipation and reduced device efficiency. Recently, however, there has been a shift in the approach to nanophotonics. Low-loss electromagnetic responses covering all four quadrants of possible permittivities and permeabilities have been achieved using completely transparent and high-refractive-index dielectric building blocks. Moreover, an emerging class of all-dielectric metamaterials consisting of anisotropic crystals has been shown to support large refractive index contrast between orthogonal polarizations of light. These advances have revived the exciting prospect of integrating exotic electromagnetic effects in practical photonic devices, to achieve, for example, ultrathin and efficient optical elements, and realize the long-standing goal of subdiffraction confinement and guiding of light without metals. In this Review, we present a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index metamaterials and anisotropic metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics, as well as biomimetic metasurfaces.

1,634 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a mushroom-like E-plane coupled E-strip antenna array on a thick and high permittivity substrate has been analyzed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method.
Abstract: Utilization of electromagnetic band-gap (EBG) structures is becoming attractive in the electromagnetic and antenna community. In this paper, a mushroom-like EBG structure is analyzed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Its band-gap feature of surface-wave suppression is demonstrated by exhibiting the near field distributions of the electromagnetic waves. The mutual coupling of microstrip antennas is parametrically investigated, including both the E and H coupling directions, different substrate thickness, and various dielectric constants. It is observed that the E-plane coupled microstrip antenna array on a thick and high permittivity substrate has a strong mutual coupling due to the pronounced surface waves. Therefore, an EBG structure is inserted between array elements to reduce the mutual coupling. This idea has been verified by both the FDTD simulations and experimental results. As a result, a significant 8 dB mutual coupling reduction is noticed from the measurements.

1,394 citations


Cites background from "High-impedance electromagnetic surf..."

  • ...There are diverse forms of EBG structures [1], [3], and novel designs such as EBG structures integrated with active device [4] and multilayer EBG structures [5] have...

    [...]

  • ...The mushroom-like EBG structure was first proposed in [3]....

    [...]

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI

[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations


"High-impedance electromagnetic surf..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Periodic two- or three-dimensional dielectric [20]–[24], metallic [25]–[28], or metallodielectric [29]–[33] structures that prevent the propagation of electromagnetic waves are known as pho-...

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: The most up-to-date resource available on antenna theory and design as mentioned in this paper provides an extended coverage of ABET design procedures and equations making meeting ABET requirements easy and preparing readers for authentic situations in industry.
Abstract: The most-up-to-date resource available on antenna theory and design Expanded coverage of design procedures and equations makes meeting ABET design requirements easy and prepares readers for authentic situations in industry New coverage of microstrip antennas exposes readers to information vital to a wide variety of practical applicationsComputer programs at end of each chapter and the accompanying disk assist in problem solving, design projects and data plotting-- Includes updated material on moment methods, radar cross section, mutual impedances, aperture and horn antennas, and antenna measurements-- Outstanding 3-dimensional illustrations help readers visualize the entire antenna radiation pattern

14,065 citations


"High-impedance electromagnetic surf..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...The solution for TE surface waves can also be obtained from the foregoing analysis by the principle of duality [ 1 ]....

    [...]

  • ...FLAT METAL sheet is used in many antennas as a reflector or ground plane [ 1 ]....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: If a three-dimensionally periodic dielectric structure has an electromagnetic band gap which overlaps the electronic band edge, then spontaneous emission can be rigorously forbidden.
Abstract: It has been recognized for some time that the spontaneous emission by atoms is not necessarily a fixed and immutable property of the coupling between matter and space, but that it can be controlled by modification of the properties of the radiation field. This is equally true in the solid state, where spontaneous emission plays a fundamental role in limiting the performance of semiconductor lasers, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and solar cells. If a three-dimensionally periodic dielectric structure has an electromagnetic band gap which overlaps the electronic band edge, then spontaneous emission can be rigorously forbidden.

12,787 citations


"High-impedance electromagnetic surf..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Periodic two- or three-dimensional dielectric [20]–[24], metallic [25]–[28], or metallodielectric [29]–[33] structures that prevent the propagation of electromagnetic waves are known as pho-...

    [...]

Book
03 Jul 1995
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors developed the theoretical tools of photonics using principles of linear algebra and symmetry, emphasizing analogies with traditional solid-state physics and quantum theory, and investigated the unique phenomena that take place within photonic crystals at defect sites and surfaces, from one to three dimensions.
Abstract: Since it was first published in 1995, Photonic Crystals has remained the definitive text for both undergraduates and researchers on photonic band-gap materials and their use in controlling the propagation of light. This newly expanded and revised edition covers the latest developments in the field, providing the most up-to-date, concise, and comprehensive book available on these novel materials and their applications. Starting from Maxwell's equations and Fourier analysis, the authors develop the theoretical tools of photonics using principles of linear algebra and symmetry, emphasizing analogies with traditional solid-state physics and quantum theory. They then investigate the unique phenomena that take place within photonic crystals at defect sites and surfaces, from one to three dimensions. This new edition includes entirely new chapters describing important hybrid structures that use band gaps or periodicity only in some directions: periodic waveguides, photonic-crystal slabs, and photonic-crystal fibers. The authors demonstrate how the capabilities of photonic crystals to localize light can be put to work in devices such as filters and splitters. A new appendix provides an overview of computational methods for electromagnetism. Existing chapters have been considerably updated and expanded to include many new three-dimensional photonic crystals, an extensive tutorial on device design using temporal coupled-mode theory, discussions of diffraction and refraction at crystal interfaces, and more. Richly illustrated and accessibly written, Photonic Crystals is an indispensable resource for students and researchers.Extensively revised and expanded Features improved graphics throughout Includes new chapters on photonic-crystal fibers and combined index-and band-gap-guiding Provides an introduction to coupled-mode theory as a powerful tool for device design Covers many new topics, including omnidirectional reflection, anomalous refraction and diffraction, computational photonics, and much more.

8,188 citations

Book
03 May 1988
TL;DR: In this article, surface plasmons on smooth surfaces were used for light scattering at rough surfaces without an ATR device, and surface plasmon on gratings for enhanced roughness.
Abstract: Surface plasmons on smooth surfaces.- Surface plasmons on surfaces of small roughness.- Surfaces of enhanced roughness.- Light scattering at rough surfaces without an ATR device.- Surface plasmons on gratings.- Conclusions.

4,890 citations


"High-impedance electromagnetic surf..." refers background in this paper

  • ...They are called surface plasmons at optical frequencies [4], but at microwave frequencies, they are nothing more than the normal currents that occur on any electric conductor....

    [...]