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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.NEUROIMAGE.2021.117931

Hippocampal subfield volumes across the healthy lifespan and the effects of MR sequence on estimates

04 Mar 2021-NeuroImage (Academic Press)-Vol. 233, pp 117931-117931
Abstract: The hippocampus has been extensively studied in various neuropsychiatric disorders throughout the lifespan. However, inconsistent results have been reported with respect to which subfield volumes are most related to age. Here, we investigate whether these discrepancies may be explained by experimental design differences that exist between studies. Multiple datasets were used to collect 1690 magnetic resonance scans from healthy individuals aged 18–95 years old. Standard T1-weighted (T1w; MPRAGE sequence, 1 mm3 voxels), high-resolution T2-weighted (T2w; SPACE sequence, 0.64 mm3 voxels) and slab T2-weighted (Slab; 2D turbo spin echo, 0.4 × 0.4 × 2 mm3 voxels) images were included. The MAGeT Brain algorithm was used for segmentation of the hippocampal grey matter (GM) subfields and peri-hippocampal white matter (WM) subregions. Linear mixed-effect models and Akaike information criterion were used to examine linear, second or third order natural splines relationship between hippocampal volumes and age. We demonstrated that stratum radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare and fornix subregions expressed the highest relative volumetric decrease, while the cornus ammonis 1 presented a relative volumetric preservation of its volume with age. We also found that volumes extracted from slab images demonstrated different age-related relationships compared to volumes extracted from T1w and T2w images. The current work suggests that although T1w, T2w and slab derived subfield volumetric outputs are largely homologous, modality choice plays a meaningful role in the volumetric estimation of the hippocampal subfields.

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Topics: Voxel (53%)
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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.NEUROIMAGE.2021.118172
Eric Plitman1, Eric Plitman2, Aurelie Bussy2, Vanessa Valiquette2  +11 moreInstitutions (3)
31 May 2021-NeuroImage
Abstract: Many magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures are being studied longitudinally to explore topics such as biomarker detection and clinical staging. A pertinent concern to longitudinal work is MRI scanner upgrades. When upgrades occur during the course of a longitudinal MRI neuroimaging investigation, there may be an impact on the compatibility of pre- and post-upgrade measures. Similarly, subject motion is another issue that may be detrimental to MRI work and embedding volumetric navigators (vNavs) within acquisition sequences has emerged as a technique that allows for prospective motion correction. Our research group recently underwent an upgrade from a Siemens MAGNETOM 3T Tim Trio system to a Siemens MAGNETOM 3T Prisma Fit system. The goals of the current work were to: 1) investigate the impact of this upgrade on commonly used structural imaging measures and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy indices (“Prisma Upgrade protocol”) and 2) examine structural imaging measures in a sequence with vNavs alongside a standard acquisition sequence (“vNav protocol”). While high reliability was observed for most of the investigated MRI outputs, suboptimal reliability was observed for certain indices. Across the scanner upgrade, increases in frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortical thickness (CT) and thalamus volume, along with decreases in parietal CT, amygdala, globus pallidus, hippocampus, and striatum volumes were observed across the upgrade. No significant impact of the upgrade was found in 1H-MRS analyses. Further, CT estimates were found to be larger in MPRAGE acquisitions compared to vNav-MPRAGE acquisitions mainly within temporal areas, while the opposite was found mostly in parietal brain regions. The results from this work should be considered in longitudinal study designs and comparable prospective motion correction investigations are warranted in cases of marked head movement.

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1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.NEUROBIOLAGING.2021.03.018
Aurelie Bussy1, Raihaan Patel2, Raihaan Patel1, Eric Plitman2  +16 moreInstitutions (3)
Abstract: The study of the hippocampus across the healthy adult lifespan has rendered inconsistent findings. While volumetric measurements have often been a popular technique for analysis, more advanced morphometric techniques have demonstrated compelling results that highlight the importance and improved specificity of shape-based measures. Here, the MAGeT Brain algorithm was applied on 134 healthy individuals aged 18–81 years old to extract hippocampal subfield volumes and hippocampal shape measurements, namely: local surface area (SA) and displacement. We used linear-, second- or third-order natural splines to examine the relationships between hippocampal measures and age. In addition, partial least squares analyses were performed to relate volume and shape measurements with cognitive and demographic information. Volumetric results indicated a relative preservation of the right cornus ammonis 1 with age and a global volume reduction linked with older age, female sex, lower levels of education and cognitive performance. Vertex-wise analysis demonstrated an SA preservation in the anterior hippocampus with a peak during the sixth decade, while the posterior hippocampal SA gradually decreased across lifespan. Overall, SA decrease was linked to older age, female sex and, to a lesser extent lower levels of education and cognitive performance. Outward displacement in the lateral hippocampus and inward displacement in the medial hippocampus were enlarged with older age, lower levels of cognition and education, indicating an accentuation of the hippocampal “C” shape with age. Taken together, our findings suggest that vertex-wise analyses have higher spatial specifity and that sex, education, and cognition are implicated in the differential impact of age on hippocampal subregions throughout its anteroposterior and medial-lateral axes. This article is part of the Virtual Special Issue titled COGNITIVE NEU- ROSCIENCE OF HEALTHY AND PATHOLOGICAL AGING. The full issue can be found on ScienceDirect at https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/neurobiology-of-aging/special-issue/105379XPWJP .

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Topics: Hippocampal formation (52%)

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1002/HBM.25614
Sandrine Cremona1, Laure Zago1, Emmanuel Mellet1, Laurent Petit1  +8 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: The relationship between hippocampal subfield volumetry and verbal list-learning test outcomes have mostly been studied in clinical and elderly populations, and remain controversial. For the first time, we characterized a relationship between verbal list-learning test outcomes and hippocampal subfield volumetry on two large separate datasets of 447 and 1,442 healthy young and middle-aged adults, and explored the processes that could explain this relationship. We observed a replicable positive linear correlation between verbal list-learning test free recall scores and CA1 volume, specific to verbal list learning as demonstrated by the hippocampal subfield volumetry independence from verbal intelligence. Learning meaningless items was also positively correlated with CA1 volume, pointing to the role of the test design rather than word meaning. Accordingly, we found that association-based mnemonics mediated the relationship between verbal list-learning test outcomes and CA1 volume. This mediation suggests that integrating items into associative representations during verbal list-learning tests explains CA1 volume variations: this new explanation is consistent with the associative functions of the human CA1.

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Topics: Verbal reasoning (58%), Free recall (53%)

Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.NEUROBIOLAGING.2021.10.003
Caitlin F Fowler1, Caitlin F Fowler2, Dana Goerzen2, Dan Madularu3  +8 moreInstitutions (3)
Abstract: Animal models are widely used to study the pathophysiology of disease and to evaluate the efficacy of novel interventions, crucial steps towards improving disease outcomes in humans. The Fischer 344 (F344) wildtype rat is a common experimental background strain for transgenic models of disease and is one of the most frequently used models in aging research. Despite frequency of use, characterization of agerelated neuroanatomical change has not been performed in the F344 rat. To this end, we present a comprehensive longitudinal examination of morphometric change in 73 brain regions and at a voxel-wise level during normative aging in vivo in a mixed-sexcohort of F344 rats. We identified the greatest vulnerability to aging within the cortex, caudoputamen, hindbrain, and internal capsule, while the influence of sex was strongest in the caudoputamen, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and thalamus, many of which are implicated in memory and motor control circuits frequently affected by aging and neurodegenerative disease. These findings provide a baseline for neuroanatomical changes associated with aging in male and female F344 rats, to which data from transgenic models or other background strains can be compared.

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Open accessPosted ContentDOI: 10.1101/2021.04.12.439510
Caitlin F Fowler1, Dana Goerzen2, Dan Madularu3, Dan Madularu1  +7 moreInstitutions (3)
13 Apr 2021-bioRxiv
Abstract: Animal models are widely used to study the pathophysiology of disease and to evaluate the efficacy of novel interventions, crucial steps towards improving disease outcomes in humans. The Fischer 344 (F344) wildtype rat is a common experimental background strain for transgenic models of disease and is also one of the most frequently used models in aging research. Despite frequency of use, characterization of neuroanatomical change with age has not been performed in the F344 rat. To this end, we present a comprehensive longitudinal examination of morphometric change in 73 brain regions and at a voxel-wise level during normative aging in a mixed-sex cohort of F344 rats. We identified age- and sex-related changes in regions such as the cortex, hippocampus, cingulum, caudoputamen, and nucleus accumbens, which are implicated in memory and motor control circuits frequently affected by aging and neurodegenerative disease. These findings provide a baseline for neuroanatomical changes associated with aging in male and female F344 rats, to which data from transgenic models or other background strains can be compared.

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107 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1109/TAC.1974.1100705
Abstract: The history of the development of statistical hypothesis testing in time series analysis is reviewed briefly and it is pointed out that the hypothesis testing procedure is not adequately defined as the procedure for statistical model identification. The classical maximum likelihood estimation procedure is reviewed and a new estimate minimum information theoretical criterion (AIC) estimate (MAICE) which is designed for the purpose of statistical identification is introduced. When there are several competing models the MAICE is defined by the model and the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters which give the minimum of AIC defined by AIC = (-2)log-(maximum likelihood) + 2(number of independently adjusted parameters within the model). MAICE provides a versatile procedure for statistical model identification which is free from the ambiguities inherent in the application of conventional hypothesis testing procedure. The practical utility of MAICE in time series analysis is demonstrated with some numerical examples.

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Topics: Likelihood function (61%), Akaike information criterion (61%), Statistical model (60%) ... read more

42,619 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/BF00308809
Abstract: Eighty-three brains obtained at autopsy from nondemented and demented individuals were examined for extracellular amyloid deposits and intraneuronal neurofibrillary changes. The distribution pattern and packing density of amyloid deposits turned out to be of limited significance for differentiation of neuropathological stages. Neurofibrillary changes occurred in the form of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads. The distribution of neuritic plaques varied widely not only within architectonic units but also from one individual to another. Neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads, in contrast, exhibited a characteristic distribution pattern permitting the differentiation of six stages. The first two stages were characterized by an either mild or severe alteration of the transentorhinal layer Pre-alpha (transentorhinal stages I-II). The two forms of limbic stages (stages III-IV) were marked by a conspicuous affection of layer Pre-alpha in both transentorhinal region and proper entorhinal cortex. In addition, there was mild involvement of the first Ammon's horn sector. The hallmark of the two isocortical stages (stages V-VI) was the destruction of virtually all isocortical association areas. The investigation showed that recognition of the six stages required qualitative evaluation of only a few key preparations.

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Topics: Senile plaques (57%), Neurofibrillary tangle (54%), Braak staging (53%) ... read more

12,262 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1126/SCIENCE.8346443
13 Aug 1993-Science
Abstract: The apolipoprotein E type 4 allele (APOE-epsilon 4) is genetically associated with the common late onset familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer9s disease (AD). Risk for AD increased from 20% to 90% and mean age at onset decreased from 84 to 68 years with increasing number of APOE-epsilon 4 alleles in 42 families with late onset AD. Thus APOE-epsilon 4 gene dose is a major risk factor for late onset AD and, in these families, homozygosity for APOE-epsilon 4 was virtually sufficient to cause AD by age 80.

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Topics: Late onset (69%), APOE*4 Allele (56%), SORL1 (54%) ... read more

8,099 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1006/NIMG.2001.0786
01 Jul 2001-NeuroImage
Abstract: Voxel-based-morphometry (VBM) is a whole-brain, unbiased technique for characterizing regional cerebral volume and tissue concentration differences in structural magnetic resonance images. We describe an optimized method of VBM to examine the effects of age on grey and white matter and CSF in 465 normal adults. Global grey matter volume decreased linearly with age, with a significantly steeper decline in males. Local areas of accelerated loss were observed bilaterally in the insula, superior parietal gyri, central sulci, and cingulate sulci. Areas exhibiting little or no age effect (relative preservation) were noted in the amygdala, hippocampi, and entorhinal cortex. Global white matter did not decline with age, but local areas of relative accelerated loss and preservation were seen. There was no interaction of age with sex for regionally specific effects. These results corroborate previous reports and indicate that VBM is a useful technique for studying structural brain correlates of ageing through life in humans.

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Topics: Grey matter (56%), White matter (54%), Voxel-based morphometry (51%) ... read more

4,134 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1097/00004728-199403000-00005
Abstract: Objective In both diagnostic and research applications, the interpretation of MR images of the human brain is facilitated when different data sets can be compared by visual inspection of equivalent anatomical planes. Quantitative analysis with predefined atlas templates often requires the initial alignment of atlas and image planes. Unfortunately, the axial planes acquired during separate scanning sessions are often different in their relative position and orientation, and these slices are not coplanar with those in the atlas. We have developed a completely automatic method to register a given volumetric data set with Talairach stereotaxic coordinate system. Materials and methods The registration method is based on multi-scale, three-dimensional (3D) cross-correlation with an average (n > 300) MR brain image volume aligned with the Talariach stereotaxic space. Once the data set is re-sampled by the transformation recovered by the algorithm, atlas slices can be directly superimposed on the corresponding slices of the re-sampled volume. the use of such a standardized space also allows the direct comparison, voxel to voxel, of two or more data sets brought into stereotaxic space. Results With use of a two-tailed Student t test for paired samples, there was no significant difference in the transformation parameters recovered by the automatic algorithm when compared with two manual landmark-based methods (p > 0.1 for all parameters except y-scale, where p > 0.05). Using root-mean-square difference between normalized voxel intensities as an unbiased measure of registration, we show that when estimated and averaged over 60 volumetric MR images in standard space, this measure was 30% lower for the automatic technique than the manual method, indicating better registrations. Likewise, the automatic method showed a 57% reduction in standard deviation, implying a more stable technique. The algorithm is able to recover the transformation even when data are missing from the top or bottom of the volume. Conclusion We present a fully automatic registration method to map volumetric data into stereotaxic space that yields results comparable with those of manually based techniques. The method requires no manual identification of points or contours and therefore does not suffer the drawbacks involved in user intervention such as reproducibility and interobserver variability.

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Topics: Stereotaxic technique (64%), Talairach coordinates (56%), Voxel (54%) ... read more

3,206 Citations


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