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Holocaust Images and Picturing Catastrophe: The Cultural Politics of Seeing

21 Oct 2011-
TL;DR: Holocaust Images and Picturing Catastrophe explores the phenomenon of Holocaust transfer, analysing the widespread practice of using the Holocaust and its imagery for the representation and recording of other historical events in various media sites as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Holocaust Images and Picturing Catastrophe explores the phenomenon of Holocaust transfer, analysing the widespread practice of using the Holocaust and its imagery for the representation and recording of other historical events in various media sites. It investigates the use of Holocaust imagery in political and legal discourses, in critical thinking and philosophy, as well as in popular culture, to provide a fresh theorisation of the manner in which the Holocaust comes loose from its historical context and is applied to events and campaigns in the contemporary public sphere. Richly illustrated with concrete examples, including prominent, international animal rights activism, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the genocide in Rwanda, this book traces the visual rhetoric of Holocaust imagery and its application to events other than the genocide of Jewish people With its discussion of the wide range of issues arising with this form of 'Holocaust-transfer', the generalization of the Holocaust as a metaphor in representations of catastrophe, as well as in other cultural locations, Holocaust Images and Picturing Catastrophe will appeal to those working in the fields of holocaust studies, cultural and visual culture studies, sociology, and media studies.
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Book
06 Jul 2017
TL;DR: In this article, Winter's panoramic history of war and memory offers an unprecedented study of transformations in our imaginings of war, from 1914 to the present, revealing the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war as a language of memory in its own right.
Abstract: What we know of war is always mediated knowledge and feeling. We need lenses to filter out some of its blinding, terrifying light. These lenses are not fixed; they change over time, and Jay Winter's panoramic history of war and memory offers an unprecedented study of transformations in our imaginings of war, from 1914 to the present. He reveals the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war, from painting and sculpture to photography, film and poetry, and ultimately to silence, as a language of memory in its own right. He shows how these highly mediated images of war, in turn, circulate through language to constitute our 'cultural memory' of war. This is a major contribution to our understanding of the diverse ways in which men and women have wrestled with the intractable task of conveying what twentieth-century wars meant to them and mean to us.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors report the results of a study of tabloid and broadsheet images of death from the 2010 Haiti earthquake in eight Western European and North American countries, and show that, far from omnipresent, graphic imagery of death are relatively rare.
Abstract: Debates over the extent of graphic imagery of death in newspapers often suffer from generalized assertions that are based on inadequate or incomplete empirical evidence. Newspapers are believed to display death in very graphic ways, with particularly the tabloid press assumedly leading a race to the bottom. This article reports the results of a study of tabloid and broadsheet images of death from the 2010 Haiti earthquake in eight Western European and North American countries. It shows that, far from omnipresent, graphic images of death are relatively rare. While tabloids overall display a larger percentage of graphic images, this was not the case everywhere, with particularly the UK, Canada and the US displaying strong similarities between tabloids and broadsheets. In Austria, Germany, Norway and Switzerland, on the other hand, there were distinct differences between the two types. The article argues that different extents of tabloidization may account for these differences.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Thomas Olesen1
TL;DR: The authors identifies and analyzes four areas in which the transformation of the Rwanda genocide from national event to global injustice memory has occurred: institutionalization, expressions of regret, analogical bridging, and cultural products.
Abstract: Within a relatively short span of time, and culminating with the tenth anniversary of the genocide in 2004, the 1994 Rwanda genocide has become a key global injustice memory. At the core of this process is a double-sided conception of injustice: on the one hand, the genocide in itself clearly constitutes a major injustice; on the other hand, injustice claims have been expanded to encompass actors outside of Rwanda who observed the horrors without instigating sufficient action to halt, or at least mitigate the effects of, the unfolding genocide. It is the fact that moral and political responsibility for the genocide has been so powerfully expanded to third parties in a spectatorship position that most vividly testifies to the global character of the Rwanda injustice memory. The article identifies and analyzes four areas in which the transformation of the Rwanda genocide from national event to global injustice memory has occurred: institutionalization, expressions of regret, analogical bridging, and cultural products. The article argues that the transformation of non-Western events into global injustice memories has so far been insufficiently explored within International Relations and global political sociology.

17 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: This paper found that the Holocaust is represented in broadly shared patterns, which convey recurrent spatial (geographical) and temporal scales, protagonists, interpretive patterns (according to definitions, causes, relativization, or banalisation), narrative techniques, and didactic methods.
Abstract: How is the Holocaust presented in secondary-level history and social studies curricula worldwide? And how is it conceptualised and narrated in textbooks? To answer these questions, researchers at the Georg Eckert Institute for International Textbook Research, in cooperation with UNESCO, documented and compared historical understandings of the Holocaust found in 272 currently valid curricula from 135 countries, and in 89 textbooks published in 26 countries since 2000. They found that the Holocaust is represented in broadly shared patterns, which convey recurrent spatial (geographical) and temporal scales, protagonists, interpretive patterns (according to definitions, causes, relativisation, or banalisation), narrative techniques, and didactic methods. At the same time, all countries demonstrate narrative idiosyncracies by emphasising selective information and the local significance of the event, or by appropriating it in the interests of local populations.

8 citations

01 Jul 2017

4 citations