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Holocaust Memory and Visuality in the Age of Social Media

01 Jan 2019-
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that these individual digital images function as objects of postmemory, contributing to and cultivating an accessible visual and digital archive of the Holocaust, and demonstrate that though the number of Holocaust survivors become fewer in number, the act of remembering the genocide can be coded into the everyday behaviour of the amateur photographers featured in this work.
Abstract: Everyday people make use of Instagram to visually share their experiences encountering Holocaust memory. Whether individuals are sharing their photos from Auschwitz, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, or of the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin, this dissertation uncovers the impetus to capture and share these images by the thousands. Using visuality as a framework for analyzing how the Holocaust has been seen, photographed, and communicated historically, this dissertation argues that these individual digital images function as objects of postmemory, contributing to and cultivating an accessible visual and digital archive. Sharing these images on Instagram results in a visual, grassroots archival space where networked Holocaust visuality and memory can flourish. The Holocaust looms large in public memory. Drawing from Holocaust studies, public history, photography theory, and new media studies, this dissertation argues that the amateur Instagram image is far from static. Existing spaces of Holocaust memory create preconditions for everyday publics to share their encounters with the Holocaust on their own terms. Thus, the final networked Instagram image is the product of a series of author interventions, carefully wrought from competing narratives and Holocaust representations. The choice to photograph, edit, post, and hashtag one's photo forges a public method for collaborating with hegemonic memory institutions. This work brings together seemingly disparate sources to find commonality between Instagram images, museum guestbook entries, online reviews, former concentration camps, and major Holocaust memorials and museums. This research, one of the first studies of Holocaust visual culture on Instagram, underscores the fluidity of Holocaust memory in the twenty-first century. While amateur photography at solemn sites has sparked concern, this dissertation demonstrates that though the number of Holocaust survivors become fewer in number, the act of remembering the genocide can be coded into the everyday behaviour of the amateur photographers featured in this work. This work not only shares authority with everyday publics in their efforts to remember and memorialize the Holocaust but reminds us that seemingly small and individual acts of remembrance can coalesce, contributing to a fluid and accessible archive of visual memory.

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Citations
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TL;DR: This paper reviewed Hirsch's new book, Golden Harvest (2012), and found that Gross took a seemingly innocent group of people and made them suffer from a "group pho....
Abstract: Given its title, I was pleased to have the opportunity to review Marianne Hirsch’s new book. I had just finished reading Jan Gross’s Golden Harvest (2012). Gross took a seemingly innocent group pho...

364 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: One of the most popular books now is the remembering to forget holocaust memory through the cameras eye as discussed by the authors, but it is difficult to find the book in the book store around your city.
Abstract: It's not surprisingly when entering this site to get the book. One of the popular books now is the remembering to forget holocaust memory through the cameras eye. You may be confused because you can't find the book in the book store around your city. Commonly, the popular book will be sold quickly. And when you have found the store to buy the book, it will be so hurt when you run out of it. This is why, searching for this popular book in this website will give you benefit. You will not run out of this book.

292 citations

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TL;DR: The Human Resources Division is responsible for ensuring that every employee receives a copy of these Standards of Ethical Conduct during his or her in-processing interview as discussed by the authors, and all supervisors are responsible to ensure that their staff members are aware of these standards of ethical conduct, and are required to contact the Ethics Officer within 30 days of assuming their position, to schedule an appointment to be briefed on their responsibilities under these Standards.
Abstract: The Human Resources Division is responsible for ensuring that every employee receives a copy of these Standards of Ethical Conduct during his or her in-processing interview. All supervisors are responsible for ensuring that their staff members are aware of these Standards of Ethical Conduct. New Office Heads and Division Directors are required to contact the Ethics Officer within 30 days of assuming their position, to schedule an appointment to be briefed on their responsibilities under these Standards.

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present Images in Spite of All: Four Photographs from Auschwitz is a two-part book, with a text that was published in 2001 in the context of 'Photographies des camps de concentration et d'extermi...
Abstract: Images in Spite of All: Four Photographs from Auschwitz is a two-part book. It begins with a text that was published in 2001 in the context of ‘Photographies des camps de concentration et d’extermi...

73 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: The Birth of the Museum as mentioned in this paper explores how nineteenth and twentieth-century museums, fairs and exhibitions have organized their collections, and their visitors, and sheds new light upon the relationship between modern forms of official and popular culture.
Abstract: In a series of richly detailed case studies from Britian, Australia and North America, Tony Bennett investigates how nineteenth- and twentieth-century museums, fairs and exhibitions have organized their collections, and their visitors. Discussing the historical development of museums alongside that of the fair and the international exhibition, Bennett sheds new light upon the relationship between modern forms of official and popular culture. Using Foucaltian perspectives The Birth of the Museum explores how the public museum should be understood not just as a place of instruction, but as a reformatory of manners in which a wide range of regulated social routines and performances take place. This invigorating study enriches and challenges the understanding of the museum, and places it at the centre of modern relations between culture and government. For students of museum, cultural and sociology studies, this will be an asset to their reading list.

1,217 citations

Book
21 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The value of media engagement and what constitutes meaningful participation is discussed in this article, where the authors discuss where Web 2.0 went wrong and the importance of media involvement in online discussion.
Abstract: Acknowledgments How to Read This Book Introduction: Why Media Spreads 1 Where Web 2.0 Went Wrong 2 Reappraising the Residual 3 The Value of Media Engagement 4 What Constitutes Meaningful Participation? 5 Designing for Spreadability 6 Courting Supporters for Independent Media 7 Thinking Transnationally Conclusion Notes References Index About the Authors

1,141 citations

Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the history of the modern world from al-Haytham to the present day: "Sight Becomes Vision: From al Haytham, to Perspective" and "1492": Expulsions, Expropriations, Encounters.
Abstract: Preface Introduction 1. Sight Becomes Vision: From al-Haytham to Perspective 2. '1492': Expulsions, Expropriations, Encounters 3. Slavery, Modernity and Visual Culture 4. Panoptic Modernity 5. Imperial Transcultures: From Kongo to Congo 6. Sexuality Disrupts: Measuring the Silences 7. Inventing the West 8. Decolonizing Vision 9. Discrete States: Digital Worlds From the Difference Engine to Web 2.0 10. The Death of 'The Death of Photography' 11. Celebrity: From Imperial Monarchy to Reality TV 12. Watching War.

836 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: What Do Pictures Want? as discussed by the authors explores the idea of pictures as animated beings with desires, needs, appetites, demands, and drives of their own. But it does not address the question of why we behave as if pictures are alive, possessing the power to influence us, to demand things from us, persuade us, seduce us, or even lead us astray.
Abstract: Why do we have such extraordinarily powerful responses toward the images and pictures we see in everyday life? Why do we behave as if pictures were alive, possessing the power to influence us, to demand things from us, to persuade us, seduce us, or even lead us astray? According to W. J. T. Mitchell, we need to reckon with images not just as inert objects that convey meaning but as animated beings with desires, needs, appetites, demands, and drives of their own. What Do Pictures Want? explores this idea and highlights Mitchell's innovative and profoundly influential thinking on picture theory and the lives and loves of images. Ranging across the visual arts, literature, and mass media, Mitchell applies characteristically brilliant and wry analyses to Byzantine icons and cyberpunk films, racial stereotypes and public monuments, ancient idols and modern clones, offensive images and found objects, American photography and aboriginal painting. Opening new vistas in iconology and the emergent field of visual culture, he also considers the importance of Dolly the Sheep--who, as a clone, fulfills the ancient dream of creating a living image--and the destruction of the World Trade Center on 9/11, which, among other things, signifies a new and virulent form of iconoclasm. What Do Pictures Want? offers an immensely rich and suggestive account of the interplay between the visible and the readable. A work by one of our leading theorists of visual representation, it will be a touchstone for art historians, literary critics, anthropologists, and philosophers alike. "A treasury of episodes--generally overlooked by art history and visual studies--that turn on images that 'walk by themselves' and exert their own power over the living."--Norman Bryson, Artforum

823 citations


"Holocaust Memory and Visuality in t..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Mitchell in his work Picture Theory (Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 1994). For more on theories of photography in historical contexts, see visual anthropologist Elizabeth Edwards’ work with Janice Hart, Photographs Objects Histories: On the Materiality of Images (London & New York: Routledge, 2004), and Edwards’ single-authored works “Photography and the Material Performance of the Past,” History and Theory 48, no. 4 (2009): 130-150 and The Camera as Historian: Amateur Photographers and Historical Imagination, 1885-1918 (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2012)....

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BookDOI
02 May 2023
TL;DR: A wide-ranging and stimulating introduction to the history and theory of visual culture from painting to the computer and television screen can be found in this paper , where Mirzoeff argues that the visual is replacing the linguistic as our primary means of communicating with each other and of understanding our postmodern world.
Abstract: This is a wide-ranging and stimulating introduction to the history and theory of visual culture from painting to the computer and television screen. It will prove indispensable to students of art and art history as well as students of cultural studies. Mirzoeff begins by defining what visual culture is, and explores how and why visual media - fine art, cinema, the Internet, advertising, performance, photography, television - have become so central to contemporary everyday life. He argues that the visual is replacing the linguistic as our primary means of communicating with each other and of understanding our postmodern world. Part One of the Introduction presents a history of modern ways of seeing, including: * the formal practices of line and colour in painting * photographys claim to represent reality * virtual reality, from the nineteenth century to the present. In Part Two, Mirzoeff examines: * the visualization of race, sexuality and human identity in culture * gender and sexuality and questions of the gaze in visual culture * representations of encounters with the other, from colonial narratives to Science Fiction texts such as The Thing, Independence Day, Star Trek and The X-Files * the death of Princess Diana and the popular mourning which followed as marking the coming of age of a global visualized culture.

796 citations