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Journal ArticleDOI

How Does Human Resource Management Influence Organizational Outcomes? A Meta-analytic Investigation of Mediating Mechanisms

01 Dec 2012-Academy of Management Journal (Academy of Management)-Vol. 55, Iss: 6, pp 1264-1294
TL;DR: The authors examined the effects of three dimensions of HR systems (skillsenhancing, motivationenhancing and opportunity-enhancing) on the ability-motivation-opportunity model.
Abstract: Drawing on the ability-motivation-opportunity model, this meta-analysis examined the effects of three dimensions of HR systems—skills-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing—on p...
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TL;DR: This paper presents a framework for studying the concepts of fit and flexibility in the field of Strategic Human Resource Management focusing on HRM practices, employee skills, and employee behaviors and reviews past conceptual and empirical work within that framework.
Abstract: This paper presents a framework for studying the concepts of fit and flexibility in the field of Strategic Human Resource Management (Strategic HRM) focusing on HRM practices, employee skills, and employee behaviors and reviews past conceptual and empirical work within that framework. A model of Strategic HRM is presented and this model is used to explore the concepts of fit and flexibility as they apply to Strategic HRM. The concepts of resource and coordination flexibility are applied to Strategic HRM, and the implications of the framework for both the practice of and research on Strategic HRM are discussed.

1,117 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The field of strategic human resource management (HRM) has a long and rich tradition as mentioned in this paper, and it has attracted much attention over the past three decades, paying particular attention to the value of HRM systems as management tools for influencing a wide variety of outcomes of concern to internal (employees and their managers) and external (owners, customers, society, other organizations).
Abstract: The field of strategic human resource management (HRM) has a long and rich tradition. As a prelude to our description of the field's history, we provide an expansive definition of strategic HRM scholarship and offer an aspirational framework for strategic HRM scholarship that captures the multidisciplinary nature of the field. We then systematically review and critique three decades of strategic HRM theory and research, paying particular attention to the value of HRM systems as management tools for influencing a wide variety of outcomes of concern to internal (employees and their managers) and external (owners, customers, society, other organizations) stakeholders. In support of continued advancement of the empirical knowledge base of strategic HRM, we encourage new research that embraces systems thinking, more fully addresses the concerns of multiple stakeholders, and strives for greater practical usefulness by addressing significant problems such as managing innovation and environmental sustaina...

616 citations


Cites background or methods or result from "How Does Human Resource Management ..."

  • ...In addition, we echo others (Guest, 2011; Jiang et al., 2012b) to encourage research that incorporates the dimension of time....

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  • ...…but its widespread adoption oversimplifies the complexity inherent in the systems theory perspective, which views systems as comprising interdependent elements that may function together synergistically and/or as substitutes for each other (Delery, 1998; Jiang et al., 2012a; Lepak et al., 2006)....

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  • ...…job satisfaction, relationships with managers, human capital development (which can serve as the basis for employment security and economic gains), and safety (for detailed reviews, see Jiang et al., 2012b; Nyberg, Moliterno, Hale, & Lepak, 2014; Van De Voorde, Paauwe, & Van Veldhoven, 2012)....

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  • ...Our reading of the evidence (77 studies) supports the conclusion drawn by others (Combs et al., 2006; Jiang et al., 2012b; Subramony, 2009): firms with coherent HRM systems outperform those without such systems on financial indicators of interest to owners and investors (e.g. return on equity,…...

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  • ...Recently, two meta-analytic reviews of these studies have appeared (Jiang et al., 2012b; Jiang, Takeuchi, & Lepak, 2013), and interested readers are directed to that review....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an alternative approach to HRM that gives priority to practices designed to enhance well-being and a positive employment relationship is proposed, and evidence is presented to support the choice of practices and to argue that these also hold the potential to improve both individual and organizational performance.
Abstract: The mutual gains model suggests that HRM should benefit both individuals and organisations. However, the dominant models within HRM theory and research continue to focus largely on ways to improve performance, with employee concerns very much a secondary consideration. Furthermore, pressures at work and in society more widely are creating an increasing threat to employee well-being. If employee concerns and the threats to well-being are to be taken seriously, a different analytic framework for HRM is required. The article sets out an alternative approach to HRM that gives priority to practices designed to enhance well-being and a positive employment relationship, proposing that both elements are essential. Evidence is presented to support the choice of practices and to argue that these also hold the potential to improve both individual and organisational performance. It therefore offers a different path to mutual gains. The research and policy implications of this approach are discussed.

611 citations


Cites background from "How Does Human Resource Management ..."

  • ...While reviews suggest that many employees respond positively to practices that reflect the AMO model (Jiang et al. 2012; Subramony, 2009), it is notable that in most reported studies worker attitudes and behaviour are viewed as a means rather than an end, with the primary focus directed to…...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors conducted a qualitative review and meta-analysis of the existing literature to better under-stand the relationships between contractual and relational governance, and found that the mutual relationships between the two types of governance are moderated by the institutional environments, the interorganizational relationship type and length, and the construct measurement of contracts.

597 citations


Cites background or methods from "How Does Human Resource Management ..."

  • ...As suggested by previous studies (Cheung and Chan, 2005), we used the random effects model and calculated the sample size and reliability adjusted correlation rc to correct the sampling error (Hunter and Schmidt, 2004; Jiang et al., 2012; Luo et al., 2012)....

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  • ...…interaction of contractual and relational governance into the structural model (Song et al., 2005); (2) examine the relationships between (p<0.001), CFI=0.98, GFI=0.98, NNFI=0.91, and SRMR=0.03, indicating that the model is acceptable (Carney et al., 2011; Hu and Bentler, 1999; Jiang et al., 2012)....

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  • ...We set up three inclusion criteria to select studies (Heugens and Lander, 2009; Jiang et al., 2012).8 The selected studies must have met the requirements of all criteria....

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  • ...If neither were reported, we used the mean of reliability to replace the missing values (Jiang et al., 2012; Lipsey and Wilson, 2001)....

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  • ...As recommended by Viswesvaran and Ones (1995) and Jiang et al. (2012), we used the harmonic mean of the correlation sample sizes as the sample size when running the SEM command in LISREL 8.54 (Jöreskog and Sörbom, 2003)....

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References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a new estimate minimum information theoretical criterion estimate (MAICE) is introduced for the purpose of statistical identification, which is free from the ambiguities inherent in the application of conventional hypothesis testing procedure.
Abstract: The history of the development of statistical hypothesis testing in time series analysis is reviewed briefly and it is pointed out that the hypothesis testing procedure is not adequately defined as the procedure for statistical model identification. The classical maximum likelihood estimation procedure is reviewed and a new estimate minimum information theoretical criterion (AIC) estimate (MAICE) which is designed for the purpose of statistical identification is introduced. When there are several competing models the MAICE is defined by the model and the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters which give the minimum of AIC defined by AIC = (-2)log-(maximum likelihood) + 2(number of independently adjusted parameters within the model). MAICE provides a versatile procedure for statistical model identification which is free from the ambiguities inherent in the application of conventional hypothesis testing procedure. The practical utility of MAICE in time series analysis is demonstrated with some numerical examples.

47,133 citations


"How Does Human Resource Management ..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...Then we used an additional fit index, Akaike’s information criterion (AIC; Akaike, 1974), which is generally used in SEM to compare nonnested models estimated with the same data (Henson, Reise, & Kim, 2007; Kline, 2005)....

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Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the link between firm resources and sustained competitive advantage and analyzed the potential of several firm resources for generating sustained competitive advantages, including value, rareness, imitability, and substitutability.

46,648 citations


"How Does Human Resource Management ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The accumulated specific human capital may in turn reduce the likelihood employees leave, because the specific human capital that is unique and valuable for their current organization may not provide value to other organizations (Barney, 1991; Lepak & Snell, 1999)....

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  • ...The resource-based view provides additional insights as to why human capital can help firms to outpace competitors and proposes that organizations obtain a competitive advantage from resources that are rare, valuable, inimitable, and nonsubstitutable (Barney, 1991; Mahoney & Pandian, 1992)....

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  • ...Researchers have widely recognized the potential impact of human capital on organizational effectiveness (Barney, 1991; Coff, 1997; Snell, Youndt, & Wright, 1996; Wright et al., 1994; Wright, Dunford, & Snell, 2001)....

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Book
27 May 1998
TL;DR: The book aims to provide the skills necessary to begin to use SEM in research and to interpret and critique the use of method by others.
Abstract: Designed for students and researchers without an extensive quantitative background, this book offers an informative guide to the application, interpretation and pitfalls of structural equation modelling (SEM) in the social sciences. The book covers introductory techniques including path analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, and provides an overview of more advanced methods such as the evaluation of non-linear effects, the analysis of means in convariance structure models, and latent growth models for longitudinal data. Providing examples from various disciplines to illustrate all aspects of SEM, the book offers clear instructions on the preparation and screening of data, common mistakes to avoid and widely used software programs (Amos, EQS and LISREL). The book aims to provide the skills necessary to begin to use SEM in research and to interpret and critique the use of method by others.

42,102 citations


"How Does Human Resource Management ..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...Then we used an additional fit index, Akaike’s information criterion (AIC; Akaike, 1974), which is generally used in SEM to compare nonnested models estimated with the same data (Henson, Reise, & Kim, 2007; Kline, 2005)....

    [...]

  • ...Four established model fit statistics—chi-square ( 2), the root-mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA), the comparative fit index (CFI), and the standardized root-mean-square residual (SRMR)—were used to examine the viability of the structural models (Kline, 2005)....

    [...]

  • ...Acceptable model fit is associated with nonsignificant chi-square values and with a CFI greater than .90, an RMSEA less than or equal to .08, and an SRMR less than .10 (Kline, 2005)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Research guided by self-determination theory has focused on the social-contextual conditions that facilitate versus forestall the natural processes of self-motivation and healthy psychological development, leading to the postulate of three innate psychological needs--competence, autonomy, and relatedness.
Abstract: Human beings can be proactive and engaged or, alternatively, passive and alienated, largely as a function of the social conditions in which they develop and function. Accordingly, research guided by self-determination theo~ has focused on the social-contextual conditions that facilitate versus forestall the natural processes of self-motivation and healthy psychological development. Specifically, factors have been examined that enhance versus undermine intrinsic motivation, self-regulation, and well-being. The findings have led to the postulate of three innate psychological needs--competence, autonomy, and relatednesswhich when satisfied yield enhanced self-motivation and mental health and when thwarted lead to diminished motivation and well-being. Also considered is the significance of these psychological needs and processes within domains such as health care, education, work, sport, religion, and psychotherapy. T he fullest representations of humanity show people to be curious, vital, and self-motivated. At their best, they are agentic and inspired, striving to learn; extend themselves; master new skills; and apply their talents responsibly. That most people show considerable effort, agency, and commitment in their lives appears, in fact, to be more normative than exceptional, suggesting some very positive and persistent features of human nature. Yet, it is also clear that the human spirit can be diminished or crushed and that individuals sometimes reject growth and responsibility. Regardless of social strata or cultural origin, examples of both children and adults who are apathetic, alienated, and irresponsible are abundant. Such non-optimal human functioning can be observed not only in our psychological clinics but also among the millions who, for hours a day, sit passively before their televisions, stare blankly from the back of their classrooms, or wait listlessly for the weekend as they go about their jobs. The persistent, proactive, and positive tendencies of human nature are clearly not invariantly apparent. The fact that human nature, phenotypically expressed, can be either active or passive, constructive or indolent, suggests more than mere dispositional differences and is a function of more than just biological endowments. It also bespeaks a wide range of reactions to social environments that is worthy of our most intense scientific investigation. Specifically, social contexts catalyze both within- and between-person differences in motivation and personal growth, resulting in people being more self-motivated, energized, and integrated in some situations, domains, and cultures than in others. Research on the conditions that foster versus undermine positive human potentials has both theoretical import and practical significance because it can contribute not only to formal knowledge of the causes of human behavior but also to the design of social environments that optimize people's development, performance, and well-being. Research guided by self-determination theory (SDT) has had an ongoing concern with precisely these

29,115 citations


"How Does Human Resource Management ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Practices such as work teams, employee involvement, and flexible job design help to generate employees’ intrinsic motivation, which encourages them to seek out challenges at work (Ryan & Deci, 2000)....

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Book
01 Jan 1964
TL;DR: In a seminal work as discussed by the authors, Peter M. Blau used concepts of exchange, reciprocity, imbalance, and power to examine social life and to derive the more complex processes in social structure from the simpler ones.
Abstract: In his landmark study of exchange and power in social life, Peter M. Blau contributes to an understanding of social structure by analyzing the social processes that govern the relations between individuals and groups. The basic question that Blau considers is: How does social life become organized into increasingly complex structures of associations among humans. This analysis, first published in 1964, represents a pioneering contribution to the sociological literature. Blau uses concepts of exchange, reciprocity, imbalance, and power to examine social life and to derive the more complex processes in social structure from the simpler ones. The principles of reciprocity and imbalance are used to derive such processes as power, changes in group structure; and the two major forces that govern the dynamics of complex social structures: the legitimization of organizing authority of increasing scope and the emergence of oppositions along different lines producing conflict and change.

16,278 citations

Trending Questions (2)
How SHRM can impact organisational outcomes?

The paper does not provide a direct answer to the query. The paper focuses on the effects of three dimensions of HR systems (skills-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing) on organizational outcomes, but does not specifically discuss the impact of strategic human resource management (SHRM) on organizational outcomes.

How does human resource management affects organization?

Human resource management affects organizations through its impact on skills, motivation, and opportunities for employees.