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Journal ArticleDOI

How Post-war Britain Reflected on the Nazi Persecution and Mass Murder of Europe's Jews: A Reassessment of Early Responses

01 Aug 2010-Jewish culture and history (Taylor & Francis Group)-Vol. 12, pp 95-130
TL;DR: The authors argue that we are mistaken if we look in the past for representations of what we recognise today as "the Holocaust" or if we treat the apparent marginalisation of the Jewish experience as a sign of malevolence.
Abstract: During the 1990s historians began paying attention to how societies in the postwar era reflected on the destruction of Europe's Jews between 1933 and 1945 and soon a consensus evolved that there had been a brief burst of media coverage and outrage related to the liberation of the concentration camps and war crimes trials in 1945–46 which soon faded. However, from 1999 a number of historians looking at the USA and other countries went beyond the identification of a postwar ‘silence’. They argued that it was broken by a deliberate effort of Jewish organisations, mainly in America, for the purpose of creating sympathy for Israel and the Jews more generally. This contribution re-assesses recent trends in the scholarship concerning post-war responses in Britain to the Jewish catastrophe of 1933–45. It argues that we are mistaken if we look in the past for representations of what we recognise today as ‘the Holocaust’ or if we treat the apparent marginalisation of the Jewish experience as a sign of malevolence o...
Citations
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01 Mar 2016
TL;DR: The authors examined the nature of press coverage in 1945, identifying themes that emerged in British and American newspaper reportage of two Nazi concentration camps, Belsen and Dachau, following liberation and during military trials.
Abstract: The thesis examines the nature of press coverage in 1945, identifying themes that emerged in British and American newspaper reportage of two Nazi concentration camps, Belsen and Dachau, following liberation and during military trials. It grapples with the links between early reporting and ongoing misunderstandings about the concentration camp system.

39 citations

Book
21 Oct 2020
TL;DR: The history of British fascism and antisemitic racism is explored in this paper, focusing on the most understudied period of British fascist history, whilst simultaneously adding to our understanding of the evolving ideology of fascism, the persistent nature of antisemitism and the blossoming of Britain's anti-immigration movement.
Abstract: groups who attempted to relaunch fascist, antisemitic and racist politics in the wake of World War II and the Holocaust. Despite the leading architects of fascism being dead and the newsreel footage of Jewish bodies being pushed into mass graves seared into societal consciousness, fascism survived World War II and, though changed, survives to this day. Britain was the country that ‘stood alone’ against fascism, but it was no exception. This book treads new historical ground and shines a light onto the most understudied period of British fascism, whilst simultaneously adding to our understanding of the evolving ideology of fascism, the persistent nature of antisemitism and the blossoming of Britain’s anti-immigration movement. This book will primarily appeal to scholars and students with an interest in the history of fascism, antisemitism and the Holocaust, racism, immigration and postwar Britain.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
L Humphrey1
TL;DR: The authors evaluate the rationale of empiricist-analytical and narrative-linguistic theories of historying through its practice, and conclude that historying can be viewed as a form of narrative linguistics.
Abstract: This article aims to contribute to debates on ‘what is history’ by evaluating the rationale of ‘empiricist-analytical’ and ‘narrative-linguistic’ theories of historying through its practice...

26 citations


Cites background from "How Post-war Britain Reflected on t..."

  • ...…no trial is a blank page, (Bloxham 2001, vii), each case had been framed and shaped by a range of national and international developments impacting on an evolution of consciousness of ‘the Holocaust’ since 1945 (Yablonka 2004; Weitz 2009; Bialystok 2000; Erwin 2016; Pearce 2008; Cesarani 2010)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2017
TL;DR: The recent resurgence of interest in imperial violence has, after all, focused heavily on the sanguinity of settler colonialism, which took shape from intensely local struggles over land and identity as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In the historiography of British imperialism, the question of scale – local versus global, micro versus macro – is fraught with political implications. When historians trace globe-spanning networks of populations, commodities, capital and information, do they necessarily obscure the human cost of empire: the messy on-the-ground realities of conquest, coercion and exploitation? In the eloquent view expressed by some critics, global scales end up privileging narratives about metropolitan elites and therefore sanitizing the violence which made British rule possible. The recent resurgence of interest in imperial violence has, after all, focused heavily on the sanguinity of settler colonialism, which took shape from intensely local struggles over land and identity. Perhaps the language of networks, movements, and flows is simply too distant, too impersonal, to do justice to the horrors of empire. The trouble here is that if we overlook one particular kind of global movement – the movement of information – we risk decoupling colonial violence from the state, the society and the culture which ultimately made it possible. Asking what metropolitan Britons knew about violence against colonized populations, arguably a matter of moral reckoning, involves recognizing at least that the use of force overseas inevitably reverberated in the metropole one way or another. Some of the most notorious atrocities inflicted on British subjects in the colonies – the suppression of the Morant Bay uprising in Jamaica in 1865, the Amritsar massacre in India in 1919, the Hola massacre in Kenya in 1959 – elicited widespread attention and impassioned responses in Britain. Other events – like the aerial bombardment of Iraq after the First World War – were not quite causes célèbres but provoked controversy in Parliament and the press nonetheless. Violent methods sometimes drew attention thanks to their defenders rather than their critics; Winston Churchill’s surprisingly frank account of a ‘punitive expedition’ on the North-West Frontier of India in 1897 is an example of this. Other kinds of knowledge were produced by the need to assess the effectiveness of violence and recalibrate it: for instance, the knowledge of bureaucrats, soldiers, and other counterinsurgency planners who recorded minutes on files, lectured at staff colleges, and crafted manuals of tactics and strategy. The history of knowledge about violence is, of course, inseparable from a broader debate about the impact of empire in Britain. Since John

15 citations

References
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Book
01 Sep 1997
TL;DR: The War and Memory in the Twentieth Century explores differing ways in which memories of conflicts are constructed from a multitude of perspectives and representations, including: * the written and spoken word * cinematic and film images * photography * monuments and memorials * museums * rituals and public celebration as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: This unique and absorbing book looks at the ways in which images and memories of war have emerged and endured in the twentieth century. Through a number of studies by the leading experts in the field, ranging from the construction of memorials through to film and personal testimonies, the complex identities of war memories and their social, cultural and political significances are thoroughly discussed. War and Memory in the Twentieth Century explores differing ways in which memories of conflicts are constructed from a multitude of perspectives and representations, including: * the written and spoken word * cinematic and film images * photography * monuments and memorials * museums * rituals and public celebrationThe book also discusses how memories of war differ between nations and individuals, and between proximity and distance in time. Wide-ranging and original, individual essays cover topics such as Anne Frank, British war crimes, the Gulf War in British popular culture, German memory and identity, and popular film. This truly interdisciplinary and wide-ranging book will be of interest to the general reader as well as students and academics of history, war and society, political science, cultural studies and media studies

75 citations

Book
24 Sep 1996
TL;DR: The World Reacts to the Holocaust is a reference work that chronicles, country-bycountry, the impact of the Holocaust on world history as discussed by the authors, covering twenty-two countries and the United Nations.
Abstract: The vast body of knowledge assembled about the Holocaust has reconstructed nearly every aspect of that tragedy. Monographs, document collections, memoirs, oral histories, novels, and films have all contributed to an understanding of the events that shocked the world into stunned silence in 1945. But what happened in the aftermath-as stunned silence gave way to a full realization of the horror-has not been as thoroughly studied. Indeed, there exists no systematic examination of how countries around the world have responded to the Holocaust after 1945. Sponsored by the Holocaust Memorial Center and under the editorship of David S. Wyman, The World Reacts to the Holocaust is a major new reference work that chronicles, country-by-country, the impact of the Holocaust on world history. Covering twenty-two countries and the United Nations, the volume carefully traces the contentions and controversies involved in the efforts to come to terms with the Holocaust, from the attitudes and perceptions of 1945 to the political, economic, and cultural legacies of the 1990s. Following a standard format, the essays, all written by prominent scholars, begin with a brief history of the Jews in each country prior to the Holocaust. They next address the characteristics of the Jewish settlements, the presence of anti-Semitism and any related violence, the role of Jews in the society, and the nature of the relationship between Jews and non-Jews. A brief narrative of the Holocaust in each country follows. Among the issues examined are the extent of the human destruction, the degree of collaboration, Jewish reactions, and efforts to save the Jews. The essays then proceed to the post-World War II era and recount the treatment of Holocaust survivors upon their return; the postwar trials of war criminals; the changes in the culture and economy of the postwar Jewish community and its position in the society; the political, literary, and historical responses to the Holocaust; and the evolving attitudes toward Jews and Jewish culture. Contributors: Irving Abella * Franklin Bialystok * Randolph L. Braham * David Cesarani * Frederick B. Chary * Deborah Dwork * Andrew Ezergailis * Seymour Maxwell Finger * Zvi Gitelman * Radu Ioanid * Dermot Keogh * Tetsu Kohno * David Kranzler * Dov Levin * Robert M. Levine * Andrei S. Markovits * Meir Michaelis * Beth Simone Noveck * Dalia Ofer * Bruce F. Pauley * Jeffrey M. Peck * Charles H. Rosenzveig * Livia Rothkirchen * Milton Shain * Michael C. Steinlauf * Robert-Jan van Pelt * David Weinberg * David S. Wyman

74 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: The first scholarly overview of Anglo-Jewish history covering the century and a half following the political emancipation in 1858 of the Jews in Britain, which is often viewed as a critical point in their history is presented in this paper.
Abstract: This book is the first scholarly overview of Anglo-Jewish history covering the century and a half following the political emancipation in 1858 of the Jews in Britain, which is often viewed as a critical point in their history. V.D. Lipman studies the process by which the originally small Anglo-Jewish community expanded as a result of the mass immigration from Eastern Europe, assisting with the new immigrants' acculturation and smoothing tensions with the larger British society. While the book deals primarily with the yeras from 1858-1939, it also offers a perspective on the years prior to "emancipation" as well as a guide through the war years up to the present. The reader is provided with the social, cultural, political, and economic life of a significant Jewish community, and a view of the immigration experience that contrasts with the American pattern.

63 citations


"How Post-war Britain Reflected on t..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The standard histories of British Jewry hardly mention the impact of the war years except in demographic terms or with reference to the rise of Zionism and fluctuations in Jewish identity.(11) Instead, the 1950s and beyond have been left mainly to sociologists, geographers, and practitioners of...

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Book
26 Nov 2002
TL;DR: The authors The Demolition of a Man: Autobiographies Moving Memories: Propaganda, Documentary and Holocaust Feature Films The Absence of Women's Hair: Memorial Sites and Museums Grandma's Tales: Young Peoples Configurations of Holocaust Memory Conclusion: (Dis)Articulations of Gender, Culture and Memory Bibliography Index Index
Abstract: Preface Acknowledgements Introduction The 'Wrong' Question: Historiographies The Demolition of a Man: Autobiographies Moving Memories: Propaganda, Documentary and Holocaust Feature Films The Absence of Women's Hair: Memorial Sites and Museums Grandma's Tales: Young Peoples Configurations of Holocaust Memory Conclusion: (Dis)Articulations of Gender, Culture and Memory Bibliography Index

56 citations