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Journal ArticleDOI

How Post-war Britain Reflected on the Nazi Persecution and Mass Murder of Europe's Jews: A Reassessment of Early Responses

01 Aug 2010-Jewish culture and history (Taylor & Francis Group)-Vol. 12, pp 95-130
TL;DR: The authors argue that we are mistaken if we look in the past for representations of what we recognise today as "the Holocaust" or if we treat the apparent marginalisation of the Jewish experience as a sign of malevolence.
Abstract: During the 1990s historians began paying attention to how societies in the postwar era reflected on the destruction of Europe's Jews between 1933 and 1945 and soon a consensus evolved that there had been a brief burst of media coverage and outrage related to the liberation of the concentration camps and war crimes trials in 1945–46 which soon faded. However, from 1999 a number of historians looking at the USA and other countries went beyond the identification of a postwar ‘silence’. They argued that it was broken by a deliberate effort of Jewish organisations, mainly in America, for the purpose of creating sympathy for Israel and the Jews more generally. This contribution re-assesses recent trends in the scholarship concerning post-war responses in Britain to the Jewish catastrophe of 1933–45. It argues that we are mistaken if we look in the past for representations of what we recognise today as ‘the Holocaust’ or if we treat the apparent marginalisation of the Jewish experience as a sign of malevolence o...
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01 Mar 2016
TL;DR: The authors examined the nature of press coverage in 1945, identifying themes that emerged in British and American newspaper reportage of two Nazi concentration camps, Belsen and Dachau, following liberation and during military trials.
Abstract: The thesis examines the nature of press coverage in 1945, identifying themes that emerged in British and American newspaper reportage of two Nazi concentration camps, Belsen and Dachau, following liberation and during military trials. It grapples with the links between early reporting and ongoing misunderstandings about the concentration camp system.

39 citations

Book
21 Oct 2020
TL;DR: The history of British fascism and antisemitic racism is explored in this paper, focusing on the most understudied period of British fascist history, whilst simultaneously adding to our understanding of the evolving ideology of fascism, the persistent nature of antisemitism and the blossoming of Britain's anti-immigration movement.
Abstract: groups who attempted to relaunch fascist, antisemitic and racist politics in the wake of World War II and the Holocaust. Despite the leading architects of fascism being dead and the newsreel footage of Jewish bodies being pushed into mass graves seared into societal consciousness, fascism survived World War II and, though changed, survives to this day. Britain was the country that ‘stood alone’ against fascism, but it was no exception. This book treads new historical ground and shines a light onto the most understudied period of British fascism, whilst simultaneously adding to our understanding of the evolving ideology of fascism, the persistent nature of antisemitism and the blossoming of Britain’s anti-immigration movement. This book will primarily appeal to scholars and students with an interest in the history of fascism, antisemitism and the Holocaust, racism, immigration and postwar Britain.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
L Humphrey1
TL;DR: The authors evaluate the rationale of empiricist-analytical and narrative-linguistic theories of historying through its practice, and conclude that historying can be viewed as a form of narrative linguistics.
Abstract: This article aims to contribute to debates on ‘what is history’ by evaluating the rationale of ‘empiricist-analytical’ and ‘narrative-linguistic’ theories of historying through its practice...

26 citations


Cites background from "How Post-war Britain Reflected on t..."

  • ...…no trial is a blank page, (Bloxham 2001, vii), each case had been framed and shaped by a range of national and international developments impacting on an evolution of consciousness of ‘the Holocaust’ since 1945 (Yablonka 2004; Weitz 2009; Bialystok 2000; Erwin 2016; Pearce 2008; Cesarani 2010)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2017
TL;DR: The recent resurgence of interest in imperial violence has, after all, focused heavily on the sanguinity of settler colonialism, which took shape from intensely local struggles over land and identity as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In the historiography of British imperialism, the question of scale – local versus global, micro versus macro – is fraught with political implications. When historians trace globe-spanning networks of populations, commodities, capital and information, do they necessarily obscure the human cost of empire: the messy on-the-ground realities of conquest, coercion and exploitation? In the eloquent view expressed by some critics, global scales end up privileging narratives about metropolitan elites and therefore sanitizing the violence which made British rule possible. The recent resurgence of interest in imperial violence has, after all, focused heavily on the sanguinity of settler colonialism, which took shape from intensely local struggles over land and identity. Perhaps the language of networks, movements, and flows is simply too distant, too impersonal, to do justice to the horrors of empire. The trouble here is that if we overlook one particular kind of global movement – the movement of information – we risk decoupling colonial violence from the state, the society and the culture which ultimately made it possible. Asking what metropolitan Britons knew about violence against colonized populations, arguably a matter of moral reckoning, involves recognizing at least that the use of force overseas inevitably reverberated in the metropole one way or another. Some of the most notorious atrocities inflicted on British subjects in the colonies – the suppression of the Morant Bay uprising in Jamaica in 1865, the Amritsar massacre in India in 1919, the Hola massacre in Kenya in 1959 – elicited widespread attention and impassioned responses in Britain. Other events – like the aerial bombardment of Iraq after the First World War – were not quite causes célèbres but provoked controversy in Parliament and the press nonetheless. Violent methods sometimes drew attention thanks to their defenders rather than their critics; Winston Churchill’s surprisingly frank account of a ‘punitive expedition’ on the North-West Frontier of India in 1897 is an example of this. Other kinds of knowledge were produced by the need to assess the effectiveness of violence and recalibrate it: for instance, the knowledge of bureaucrats, soldiers, and other counterinsurgency planners who recorded minutes on files, lectured at staff colleges, and crafted manuals of tactics and strategy. The history of knowledge about violence is, of course, inseparable from a broader debate about the impact of empire in Britain. Since John

15 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI

3 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, Efraim Sicher limits his studv to those marginal writers who, though publicly identified themselves as Jews, are Jews outside the organized Jewish community and distant from traditional Jewish life.
Abstract: In his attempt to handle this problem, Efraim Sicher limits his studv to those marginal writers who, though publicly identified themselves as Jews, "are Jews outside the organized Jewish community and distant from traditional Jewish life" (p x) Into this category seem to fall some of the most notable novelists, playwrights, and poets which the Anglo-Jewish community has contributed in the last three decades

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Patrick Gordon Walker took a radio van into Belsen five days after the liberation and described obtaining interviews from survivors and guards, and several harrowing episodes as discussed by the authors, and the recordings he made were heard by millions in two programmes broadcast on the Home Service several weeks later.
Abstract: Patrick Gordon Walker took a radio van into Belsen five days after the liberation. In his detailed and frank diary he described obtaining interviews from survivors and guards, and several harrowing episodes. The recordings he made were heard by millions in two programmes broadcast on the Home Service several weeks later. The following year the BBC marked the first anniversary of Belsen’s liberation with an ambitious ‘drama-documentary’, based on Jerseyman Harold Le Druillenec’s experiences in Neuengamme and Belsen. These programmes show that - although the full history behind Belsen was not appreciated - the BBC nonetheless made it a priority to convey the ‘concentration camp story’ to its listeners.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

1 citations