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Book ChapterDOI

Hyper Design Thinking: Critique, Praxis and Reflection

01 Jan 2017-pp 301-320
TL;DR: In this article, the integration of creative, critical and reflective thinking practices within a design process leads to the sustained reflexive habits and evolving critical dispositions crucial to design and technology education.
Abstract: A practice of critique, integrated with design as a ‘disciplinary habit of mind’ (Klebesadel and Kornetsky 2009, p. 99), sustains and hyperextends students’ capacity for design thinking and metacognition. A forward-thinking, design-focused curriculum in design and technology education demands the evolution of such critical dispositions. Reflective thinking and writing practices unite creative and critical analysis with design process, enabling deeper engagement with praxis, metacognition and critique. This chapter observes how these critical, creative and reflective dialogic design-based thinking and writing practices, already employed in design and visual arts education, can augment design and technology curricula. Reflective practice and writing are able to enhance cyclic, critical and design thinking within design and technology curricula through the praxis-based application of critique. Practical methods to stimulate modes of design thinking and communication include critical, creative and reflective thinking and writing. Application of these dialogic methods occurs through opportunities for low-risk exploration through oral and written discourse within a critical and cylic design process. The integration of creative, critical and reflective thinking practices within a design process leads to the sustained reflexive habits and evolving critical dispositions crucial to design and technology education.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors make a contribution to design education in school contexts through an empirical analysis of curriculum documents to illuminate the complexity of the concept of design and the pedagogical implications of its multiple representations in this curriculum document.
Abstract: Design education as a field is growing rapidly due to its potential to develop the capacity of students to become creative and imaginative thinkers. In addition to these key twenty-first century skills, design education can also equip students with problem solving skills and innovative capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to build an understanding of how design is represented within the Australian Curriculum: Technologies document and critically explore effects of these representations within and between Key Learning Areas. The paper makes a contribution to design education in school contexts through an empirical analysis of curriculum documents to illuminate the complexity of the concept of design and the pedagogical implications of its multiple representations in this curriculum document. The analysis includes identification of the Key Learning Area in which design is most frequently represented across the Australian Curriculum. Content analysis with concept mapping are used to interrogate how design is represented within and throughout curriculum documents. We also undertake a critical examination of how design is positioned in the curriculum and the implications of such positioning. The paper argues the need for strong, unambiguous representations of design to inform curriculum and pedagogy. Clarity of the representation of design will contribute to the development of innovative capabilities in students and help to prepare them for an uncertain future.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a study was conducted to determine the viability of technology student teachers taking the school subject technology and developing discipline knowledge simultaneously within the broader development of their PCK, with the requirement that it happens within a social constructivist, co-operative learning environment with ample opportunities for cognitive and practical apprenticeship in a community of practice.
Abstract: The continual trend of the declining number of prospective student teachers in technology education necessitated a revisit and investigation of the entrance requirement (for technology teacher education) of having studied technology as a school subject. Subsequently a small scale, longitudinal, quasi-experimental research project was adopted with the aim to increase the number of prospective student teachers in technology education. As part of the project technology student teachers had to take the school subject in parallel together with the development of discipline knowledge within the broader development of their PCK. However, the viability of such a parallel approach of taking the school subject and developing discipline knowledge simultaneously was unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine the viability of technology student teachers taking the school subject technology and developing discipline knowledge simultaneously within the broader development of their PCK. The main research question was: What is the viability of technology student teachers taking the school subject technology and developing discipline knowledge simultaneously within the broader development of their PCK? The population consisted of the technology student teachers who enrolled for the 4-year pre-service teacher education qualification for the first time in 2016 and 2017, and a mixed-method research approach was followed. The qualitative findings did not indicate important differences in student experience between students with or without Engineering Graphics and Design (EGD) in year 12 for both cohorts. The quantitative findings indicated that although the students from both Cohort 1 and Cohort 2 who had studied EGD in year 12 achieved statistically significantly higher marks at the end of their first year than those who did not have EGD in year 12, students without EGD in year 12 from both cohorts also completed their second year successfully. It was found that the parallel approach to PCK development in technology teacher education seems to be viable to increase the number of prospective technology student teachers, with the requirement that it happens within a social constructivist, co-operative learning environment with ample opportunities for cognitive and practical apprenticeship in a community of practice.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the predictive value of general intelligence and its malleability in pertinent research is discussed, and some implications for intelligence in practice are discussed as well as an argument and rationale as to why D&T researchers need to give more consideration.
Abstract: General intelligence is a fundamental human capacity with significant educational implications. However, it is often not considered in educational research despite substantial evidence illustrating its association with positive life outcomes and student’s capacity to learn. There are a number of potential reasons for this including the controversial history of the use of intelligence tests, validity concerns, counter-moral implications associated with equality, lack of related training, and discipline research priorities. Design and technology (D&T) education however presents a subject area where consideration of student’s intelligence appears particularly important. The focus on design provides students with regular variation learning contexts, with a similar phenomenon occurring through the subject areas focus on technology as a result of constant cultural and societal technological advances. However, intelligence is rarely considered within D&T education research. Therefore, this article puts forward an argument and rationale as to why D&T researchers need to give more consideration to the predictive value of general intelligence and its malleability in pertinent research and discusses some implications for intelligence in practice.

1 citations


Cites background from "Hyper Design Thinking: Critique, Pr..."

  • ...…within D&T education (Spendlove 2017) and the need to consider signature pedagogies, such as demonstrations (McLain 2018, 2019) and critique (von Mengersen 2017) within D&T. Additionally, while not an exhaustive list, four recent publications offer further clarity surrounding contemporary…...

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References
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Book
Nigel Cross1
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors take up the arguments for a "third area" of education (design) that were outlined by Archer, and further define this area by contrasting it with the other two (sciences and humanities) and consider the criteria which design must satisfy to be acceptable as a part of general education.
Abstract: This is the third paper in a series being published in Design Studies, which aims to establish the theoretical bases for treating design as a coherent discipline of study. The first contribution in the series was from Bruce Archer, in the very first issue of Design Studies, and the second was from Gerald Nadler, in Vol 1, No 5. Further contributions are invited. Here, Higel Cross takes up the arguments for a ‘third area’ of education—design—that were outlined by Archer. He further defines this area by contrasting it with the other two—sciences and humanities—and goes on to consider the criteria which design must satisfy to be acceptable as a part of general education. Such an acceptance must imply a reorientation from the instrumental aims of conventional design education, towards intrinsic values. These values derive from the ‘designerly ways of knowing’. Because of a common concern with these fundamental ‘ways of knowing’, both design research and design education are contributing to the development of design as a discipline.

2,593 citations

Book
26 Apr 2005
TL;DR: Reflection is a technique for aiding and reinforcing learning, used in education and professional development as discussed by the authors, and this volume offers practitioners and students guidance that cuts across theoretical approaches, enabling them to understand and use reflection to enhance learning in practice.
Abstract: Reflection is a technique for aiding and reinforcing learning, used in education and professional development. This volume offers practitioners and students guidance that cuts across theoretical approaches, enabling them to understand and use reflection to enhance learning in practice.

1,482 citations

Book
10 Jun 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide concrete examples of studio-based research in art, film, video, creative writing and dance, each contextualized by a theoretical essay, complete with references.
Abstract: Practice-led research is a burgeoning area across the creative arts, with studio-based doctorates now increasingly favored over traditional research. This new paperback edition of the first book to be designed specifically as a training tool to guide students embarking on such research will be welcomed by students and educators. The chapters provide concrete examples of studio-based research in art, film, video, creative writing and dance, each contextualized by a theoretical essay, complete with references. More than a handbook, the volume draws on such thinkers as Deleuze, Bourdieu and Heidegger in its examination of the relationship between practice and theory. It takes pains to elaborate methodologies, outcomes and contexts and is a valuable demonstration of how practice can operate as a valid alternative mode of inquiry to traditional scholarly research.

421 citations

Book
01 Nov 1999
TL;DR: This book discusses how students Learn From Learning Journals: Journal Writing as a Process that Accentuates Favourable Conditions for Learning and activities to Enhance Learning from Journals.
Abstract: Fully updated with important new theory and practical material, this second edition of Learning Journals offers guidance on keeping and using journals and gives step-by-step advice on integrating journal writing on taught courses, in training and professional development and in supporting personal development planning (PDP) activities. Key topics covered include: the nature of learning journals and how we learn from them the broad range of uses of learning journals, including portfolios and personal and professional development the depth and quality of reflection in learning journals the assessment of learning journals and reflective writing the use of narrative and story-telling techniques in journals. With useful exercises and activities that enhance learning journal work in a structured manner, Learning Journals is invaluable reading for teachers and students in higher education, for all professionals, particularly those working in the health services and business and training and for all those who want to learn more about keeping a fulfilling personal journal.

359 citations

Book
12 Sep 2007
TL;DR: The Pedagogy of Academic Assertiveness as mentioned in this paper is a pedagogy for academic assertiveness and critical thinking in the context of critical thinking, and it is based on the idea of "critical thinking as an elusive concept".
Abstract: @contents:Preface Part 1 Introduction to the book Chapter 1 Introduction: the topic, the content, the writer ... Part 2: Mapping the territory of critical thinking Chapter 2 Critical thinking as an elusive concept: what critical thinking might be... Chapter 3 Approaches to critical thinking in the literature Chapter 4 Some of the broader issues of critical thinking - standards, objectivity and the cultural basis Part 3: The person as a critical thinker Chapter 5 The role of emotion, language and curiosity in critical thinking Chapter 6 'Academic assertiveness': being appropriately assertive as a thinker Part 4 Taking Stock Chapter 7 Critical thinking - a pause to take stock... Part 5 Epistemological development and depth in critical thinking Chapter 8 Critical thinking and learners' conceptions of knowledge Chapter 9 Depth in critical thinking Part 6 Critical thinking and pedagogy Chapter 10 A defining statement on critical thinking and an introduction to the pedagogy Chapter 11 The pedagogy of critical thinking Chapter 12 The Pedagogy of Academic Assertiveness Part 7 Resources Section Resources References

350 citations