scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

I think I’m happy, she thought, but am I real?

01 Jan 2020-Journal of Writing in Creative Practice (Intellect)-Vol. 13, Iss: 1, pp 111-116
TL;DR: The Cartography_for_girls Instagram account as discussed by the authors is an Instagram account set up to share some of the expressions of feminine subjectivity sourced from within Iris Murdoch's 26 novels, originally published between 1954 and 1995.
Abstract: I am interested in the possibilities of redressing the absence of feminine subjectivity in the discourses surrounding Iris Murdoch’s philosophical and fictional writing. @cartography_for_girls is an Instagram account set up to share some of the expressions of feminine subjectivity sourced from within Murdoch’s 26 novels, originally published between 1954 and 1995. Murdoch’s incorporation of her particular metaphysical thinking into the reflections, deliberations and doubts of her fictional women characters made me wonder how these philosophically loaded impressions might fare on the affect- and information-driven social networking platform Instagram. ‘I think I’m happy, she thought, but am I real?’, for example, is an interior thought that resonates in ways more than metaphysical against the backdrop of Web 2.0, and is one of 100 posts shared daily from 21 October 2017 to 23 January 2018.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the curation of information and objects by writers and artists who offer alternative spaces of representation and interpretation, taking the museum as a starting point, and examined my own use of the hashtag and its relation to classification and keywords in a recent Instagram project @cartography_for_girls.
Abstract: The principle that classification may always be provisional and illusory continues to be of relevance and concern to art and curation that seeks to expose the fallacies of systematic order and taxonomy. Taking the museum as a starting point, this article explores the curation of information and objects by writers and artists who offer alternative spaces of representation and interpretation. Language is fundamental to these curatorial undertakings, for example: the keywords chosen as starting points by Daniel Spoerri and Marie-Louise Plessen for their 1981 Musée Sentimental de Prusse; Tate Liverpool’s choice of artwork for their 2014 interpretation of Raymond Williams’ 1988 book Keywords; and Rose English’s choice of words to explore during her 1983 performance Plato’s Chair, included in the Keywords exhibition. Developing into a consideration of social networking as a space of curated representation, the article examines my own use of the hashtag and its relation to classification and keywords in a recent Instagram project @cartography_for_girls. I set up the account to share the thoughts of philosopher and novelist Iris Murdoch’s fictional women characters on a platform synonymous with personal articulation and connection seeking. The hashtag offered a taxonomy with which to engage with Iris Murdoch’s advocacy of the acceptance of contingency and to her assertion that ‘the task of classifying […] can perhaps never be more than a (serious) game’.

2 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the curation of information and objects by writers and artists who offer alternative spaces of representation and interpretation, taking the museum as a starting point, and examined my own use of the hashtag and its relation to classification and keywords in a recent Instagram project @cartography_for_girls.
Abstract: The principle that classification may always be provisional and illusory continues to be of relevance and concern to art and curation that seeks to expose the fallacies of systematic order and taxonomy. Taking the museum as a starting point, this article explores the curation of information and objects by writers and artists who offer alternative spaces of representation and interpretation. Language is fundamental to these curatorial undertakings, for example: the keywords chosen as starting points by Daniel Spoerri and Marie-Louise Plessen for their 1981 Musée Sentimental de Prusse; Tate Liverpool’s choice of artwork for their 2014 interpretation of Raymond Williams’ 1988 book Keywords; and Rose English’s choice of words to explore during her 1983 performance Plato’s Chair, included in the Keywords exhibition. Developing into a consideration of social networking as a space of curated representation, the article examines my own use of the hashtag and its relation to classification and keywords in a recent Instagram project @cartography_for_girls. I set up the account to share the thoughts of philosopher and novelist Iris Murdoch’s fictional women characters on a platform synonymous with personal articulation and connection seeking. The hashtag offered a taxonomy with which to engage with Iris Murdoch’s advocacy of the acceptance of contingency and to her assertion that ‘the task of classifying […] can perhaps never be more than a (serious) game’.

2 citations