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Journal ArticleDOI

“Imagine what it would be like to have a brand-new heart”: Biosentimentality and embodied-relationality in Change of Heart: A Novel

TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss how the received heart triggers anxiety and the narrative crisis in the heart recipient who develops an ambiguous identity, and discuss the change of heart in Picoult's book.
Abstract: This paper discusses Jodi Picoult’s Change of Heart: A Novel in order to foreground how the received heart triggers anxiety and the narrative crisis in the heart recipient who develops an ambiguous...
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
08 Sep 1978-Science

5,182 citations

Journal Article

46 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: Thank you for reading phantoms in the brain human nature and the architecture of the mind, which will help people to cope with some infectious bugs inside their laptop.
Abstract: Thank you for reading phantoms in the brain human nature and the architecture of the mind. As you may know, people have look numerous times for their chosen novels like this phantoms in the brain human nature and the architecture of the mind, but end up in infectious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they cope with some infectious bugs inside their laptop.

25 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1945
TL;DR: Carman as discussed by the authors described the body as an object and Mechanistic Physiology, and the experience of the body and classical psychology as a Sexed being, as well as the Synthesis of One's Own Body and Motility.
Abstract: Foreword, Taylor Carman Introduction, Claude Lefort Preface Introduction: Classical Prejudices and the Return to Phenomena I. Sensation II. Association and the Projection of Memories III. Attention and Judgment IV. The Phenomenal Field Part 1: The Body 1. The Body as an Object and Mechanistic Physiology 2. The Experience of the Body and Classical Psychology 3. The Spatiality of the One's Own Body and Motility 4. The Synthesis of One's Own Body 5. The Body as a Sexed Being 6. Speech and the Body as Expression Part 2: The Perceived World 7. Sensing 8. Space 9. The Thing and the Natural World 10. Others and the Human World Part 3: Being-For-Itself and Being-In-The-World 11. The Cogito 12. Temporality 13. Freedom Original Bibliography Bibliography of English Translations cited Additional Work Cited Index

9,938 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The authors argued that rational decisions are not the product of logic alone - they require the support of emotion and feeling, drawing on his experience with neurological patients affected with brain damage, Dr Damasio showed how absence of emotions and feelings can break down rationality.
Abstract: Descartes' Error offers the scientific basis for ending the division between mind and body. Antonio Damasio contends that rational decisions are not the product of logic alone - they require the support of emotion and feeling. Drawing on his experience with neurological patients affected with brain damage, Dr Damasio shows how absence of emotions and feelings can break down rationality. He also offers a new perspective on what emotions and feelings actually are: a direct view of our own body states; a link between the body and its survival-oriented regulation on the one hand, and consciousness on the other. Written as a conversation between the author and an imaginary listener, Descartes' Error leads us to conclude that human organisms are endowed from their very beginning with a spirited passion for making choices, which the social mind can then use to build rational behaviour.

9,648 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
08 Sep 1978-Science

5,182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
06 May 1995-BMJ
TL;DR: Brain books are similarly popular: humans are considered from a pathological/laboratory perspective and computer metaphors abound (your mind is your software!) and there are boxes and arrows in profusion.
Abstract: Antonio R Damasio Picador, pounds sterling16.99, pp 312 ISBN 0 330 33927 3 Documentary makers find the brain sexy at present; surf the television channels and the workings of the psyche are hard to avoid: violence, paraphilias, psychopathy, all are explained. Brain books are similarly popular. They come in three varieties. There is the “you're only” school: you're only a cluster of neurons (Francis Crick), processes (Daniel Dennett), microtubules (Sir Roger Penrose) and so on in a reductionist vein. Humans are considered from a pathological/laboratory perspective. Computer metaphors abound (your mind is your software!) and there are boxes and arrows in profusion. Such books …

4,386 citations


"“Imagine what it would be like to h..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The fictional representation of the problematized and reterritorialized life narratives of the recipients by the received tissue correlates to Antonio Damasio’s (1994) explanation of how our notion of self is repeatedly reconfigured by our emotional and embodied states....

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