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Journal ArticleDOI

Impact of tooth loss related to number and position on oral health quality of life among adults

30 Nov 2014-Health and Quality of Life Outcomes (BioMed Central)-Vol. 12, Iss: 1, pp 165-165
Topics: Tooth loss (64%), Anterior teeth (51%)

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a non-coding RNA family. They act as negative regulators of protein translation by affecting messenger RNA (mRNA) stability; they modulate numerous signaling pathways and cellular processes, and are involved in cell-to-cell communication. Thus, studies on miRNAs offer an opportunity to improve our understanding of complex biological mechanisms. In the cardiovascular system, miRNAs control functions of various cells, such as cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. The pivotal role of miRNAs in the cardiovascular system provides a new perspective on the pathophysiology of disorders like myocardial infarction, hypertrophy, fibrosis, heart failure, arrhythmia, inflammation and atherosclerosis. MiRNAs are differentially expressed in diseased tissue and can be released into circulation. Manipulation of miRNA activity may influence the course of a disease. Therefore, miRNAs have become an active field of research for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. This review discusses emerging functions of miRNAs in cardiogenesis, heart regeneration and the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases.

189 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results indicate that periodontal disease may exert an impact on quality of life of individuals, with greater severity of the disease related to greater impact.
Abstract: The diagnosis of periodontal disease is commonly based on objective evaluations of the patient's medical/dental history as well as clinical and radiographic examinations. However, periodontal disease should also be evaluated subjectively through measures that quantify its impact on oral health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of periodontal disease on quality of life among adolescents, adults and older adults. A systematic search of the literature was performed for scientific articles published up to July 2015 using electronic databases and a manual search. Two independent reviewers performed the selection of the studies, extracted the data and assessed the methodological quality. Thirty-four cross-sectional studies involving any age group, except children, and the use of questionnaires for the assessment of the impact of periodontal disease on quality of life were included. Twenty-five studies demonstrated that periodontal disease was associated with a negative impact on quality of life, with severe periodontitis exerting the most significant impact by compromising aspects related to function and esthetics. Unlike periodontitis, gingivitis was associated with pain as well as difficulties performing oral hygiene and wearing dentures. Gingivitis was also negatively correlated with comfort. The results indicate that periodontal disease may exert an impact on quality of life of individuals, with greater severity of the disease related to greater impact. Longitudinal studies with representative samples are needed to ensure validity of the findings.

126 citations


Cites background from "Impact of tooth loss related to num..."

  • ...In other studies, the risk of evaluation bias was found (18,25,34)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Overall, periodontitis is highly prevalent in this subpopulation, with two-thirds of dentate older adults affected at any geographic level, and how the overall health-care management of older adults should consider the improvement of their oral health conditions is determined.
Abstract: The older adult population is growing rapidly in the USA and it is expected that by 2040 the number of adults ≥ 65 years of age will have increased by about 50%. With the growth of this subpopulation, oral health status, and periodontal status in particular, becomes important in the quest to maintain an adequate quality of life. Poor oral health can have a major impact, leading to tooth loss, pain and discomfort, and may prevent older adults from chewing food properly, often leading to poor nutrition. Periodontitis is monitored in the USA at the national level as part of the Healthy People 2020 initiative. In this report, we provide estimates of the overall burden of periodontitis among adults ≥ 65 years of age and after stratification according to sociodemographic factors, modifiable risk factors (such as smoking status), the presence of other systemic conditions (such as diabetes) and access to dental care. We also estimated the burden of periodontitis within this age group at the state and local levels. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009/2010 and 2011/2012 cycles were analyzed. Periodontal measures from both survey cycles were based on a full-mouth periodontal examination. Nineteen per cent of adults in this subpopulation were edentulous. The mean age was 73 years, 7% were current smokers, 8% lived below the 100% Federal Poverty Level and < 40% had seen a dentist in the past year. Almost two-thirds (62.3%) had one or more sites with ≥ 5 mm of clinical attachment loss and almost half had at least one site with probing pocket depth of ≥ 4 mm. We estimated the lowest prevalence of periodontitis in Utah (62.3%) and New Hampshire (62.6%) and the highest in New Mexico, Hawaii, and the District of Columbia each with a prevalence of higher than 70%. Overall, periodontitis is highly prevalent in this subpopulation, with two-thirds of dentate older adults affected at any geographic level. These findings provide an opportunity to determine how the overall health-care management of older adults should consider the improvement of their oral health conditions. Many older adults do not have dental insurance and are also likely to have some chronic conditions, which can adversely affect their oral health.

126 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evidence is found that retention of teeth is associated with better OHRQoL, and two randomized clinical trials on SDAs indicated that people with SDAs do not show worse OHRZoL than do those with removable dentures.
Abstract: The authors aimed to critically review the literature regarding the relationship between retention of teeth and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and the extent to which tooth retention can ensure OHRQoL among adults. The authors investigated studies that assessed the relationship between number of teeth and OHRQoL and how the position, type, and/or pattern of the teeth is related to OHRQoL. Relevant papers published in English from January 2004 to September 2015 were searched via PubMed and EMBASE. Twenty-nine papers-including cross-sectional, longitudinal, clinical trial, and case-control studies-were included and categorized according to 4 subthemes to achieve the stated aim: 1) number of teeth or missing teeth and OHRQoL, 2) occluding pairs or functional units and OHRQoL, 3) position of remaining or missing teeth and OHRQoL, and 4) shortened dental arches (SDAs) and OHRQoL. The main findings for each subtheme were as follows: 1) A significant association between number of teeth and OHRQoL was shown in most studies; however, those studies found different cutoff points regarding the number of teeth that affect OHRQoL, after adjusting for other factors in the analyses (e.g., age, sex, cultural background, and study locations). 2) The number of occluding pairs and the location of remaining teeth have great impacts on OHRQoL. 3) Having fewer anterior occluding pairs had a greater negative impact on aesthetics and thus affected OHRQoL. 4) Two randomized clinical trials on SDAs indicated that people with SDAs do not show worse OHRQoL than do those with removable dentures. The only 2 population-based studies on SDAs showed that adults with SDAs have no impaired OHRQoL when compared with those having more natural teeth. To conclude, this review found evidence that retention of teeth is associated with better OHRQoL. The number of occluding pairs and the location of remaining teeth have great impacts on OHRQoL. People with SDAs maintain an acceptable level of OHRQoL.

78 citations


Cites background from "Impact of tooth loss related to num..."

  • ...All 8 studies showed that the position of missing teeth was significantly related to impaired OHRQoL (Tsakos et al. 2006; Walter et al. 2007; Baba et al. 2008b; Mesas et al. 2008; Pallegedara and Ekanayake 2008; Al-Omiri et al. 2009; Perera and Ekanayake 2012; Batista et al. 2014)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Adjusting for age, sex and SES, OHL is related to a risk factor (biofilm) and a consequence of poor oral health (emergency dental visits) and can interfere with the impact of oral diseases on quality of life.
Abstract: To investigate the association between critical and communicative oral health literacy (OHL) and oral health outcomes (status, oral health-related quality of life and practices) in adults. This cross-sectional study examined a household probability sample of 248 adults, representing 149,635 residents (20–64 years old) in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. Clinical oral health and socioeconomic and demographic data, as well as data on oral health-related quality of life (OHIP-14) and health practices were collected. The oral examinations were carried out in the participants’ homes, using the World Health Organization criteria for oral diseases. The critical and communicative OHL instrument was the primary independent variable, and it was measured using five Likert items that were dichotomized as ‘high’ (‘agree’ and ‘strongly agree’ responses for the 5 items) and ‘low’ OHL. Binary and multinomial logistic regressions were performed on each outcome (oral health status and practices), controlling for age, sex and socioeconomic status (SES). Approximately 71.5% presented low OHL. When adjusted for age and sex (first model) low OHL was associated with untreated caries (Odds Ratio = 1.92, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.07–3.45), tooth brushing <3 times a day (OR = 2.00, 1.11–3.62) and irregular tooth flossing (OR = 2.17, 1.24–3.80). After SES inclusion in the first model, significant associations were found for low OHL when the outcomes were: presence of biofilm (OR = 1.83, 1.08–3.33), dental care for emergency only (OR = 2.24, 1.24–4.04) and prevalence of oral health impact on quality of life (OR = 2.06, 1.15–3.69). Adjusting for age, sex and SES, OHL is related to a risk factor (biofilm) and a consequence of poor oral health (emergency dental visits) and can interfere with the impact of oral diseases on quality of life. As low OHL can be modified, the results support oral health promotion strategies directed at improving critical and communicative oral health literacy in adult populations.

58 citations


Cites background or methods from "Impact of tooth loss related to num..."

  • ...The past caries experience was used as the calculation base, as measured by the DMFT (Decayed, Missed and Filled Teeth) index in adults [13], and adjusted for the population size of Piracicaba....

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  • ...Health literacy (HL) relates to the capacity of individuals to acquire, understand and take action on health information and make appropriate health decisions, with the final objective being the maintenance of their health or the management of a disease [4], which means autonomy in * Correspondence: mariliajbatista@yahoo.com.br 1Community Health, Jundiai Medical School, Francisco Telles, 250, P.O. Box1295, Jundiaí, SP 13202-550, Brazil 2Community Health Graduate Program, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Avenida Limeira 901, P.O. Box 52, Piracicaba, SP 13414-018, Brazil Full list of author information is available at the end of the article © The Author(s)....

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  • ...For our study, we used the instrument of Ishkawa et al. [7] to assess the communicative and critical literacy of adults in Piracicaba city in the State of São Paulo, Brazil and their association with oral health outcomes, including oral health status measures, oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and oral care practices....

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  • ...This study is nested in a research project evaluating the oral health status of a cohort of 20 to 64 year-old adults who were residents of Piracicaba [12]....

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  • ...4Department of Community Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Brazil, Avenida Limeira 901, P.O. Box 52, Piracicaba, SP 13414-018, Brazil....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A Commission on Social Determinants of Health is launching, which will review the evidence, raise societal debate, and recommend policies with the goal of improving health of the world's most vulnerable people.
Abstract: The gross inequalities in health that we see within and between countries present a challenge to the world. That there should be a spread of life expectancy of 48 years among countries and 20 years or more within countries is not inevitable. A burgeoning volume of research identifies social factors at the root of much of these inequalities in health. Social determinants are relevant to communicable and non-communicable disease alike. Health status, therefore, should be of concern to policy makers in every sector, not solely those involved in health policy. As a response to this global challenge, WHO is launching a Commission on Social Determinants of Health, which will review the evidence, raise societal debate, and recommend policies with the goal of improving health of the world's most vulnerable people. A major thrust of the Commission is turning public-health knowledge into political action.

3,230 citations


01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: A systematic review of studies published from January 1, 1950, through November 31, 2008 using PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, and all Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews found that randomized clinical trials and prospective studies of RRTs that reported data on changes in the primary outcome of hospital mortality or the secondary outcome of cardiopulmonary arrest cases were included.
Abstract: Methods: We conducted a systematic review of studies published from January 1, 1950, through November 31, 2008, using PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, and all Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews. Randomized clinical trials and prospective studies of RRTs that reported data on changes in the primary outcome of hospital mortality or the secondary outcome of cardiopulmonary arrest cases were included.

2,957 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: The origin of indices for recording gingivitis and plaque is reviewed and the use of the site prevalence of a single finding is suggested, which could be used as a clinically relevant parameter for oral hygiene and gingival inflammation.
Abstract: The origin of indices for recording gingivitis and plaque is reviewed. Each index seems to have been constructed for a special purpose. The development so far has been towards more and more delicately graded indices which are well suited for evaluation of short term clinical trials. The increased sensitively, though advantageous for scientific purpose, is not always practical from a public dental health point of view. It seems that at present there is a need for several different types of index systems. In order to be able to conduct his preventive programs the practicing dentist needs a simple and well defined recording system for oral hygiene and gingival inflammation. Such an index system should be as easy and natural to use as is the scoring of decayed and filled surfaces today. Instead of using individual mean scores of multi-graded plaque and gingival indices, the use of the site prevalence of a single finding is suggested. For recording of gingivitis in daily dental practice the number of gingival margins bleeding on pressure is recommended to be determined as a percentage of the sites examined (Fig. 1,2 and 3). For oral hygiene, correspondingly, the frequency of occurrence of tooth surfaces covered with clearly visible plaque could be used as a clinically relevant parameter (Fig. 4). Keeping visible plaque and gingival bleeding away is also suggested to be a clearly understandable and practical aim in the dental health education of the individual patient.

2,330 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: The Oral Health Impact Profile offers a reliable and valid instrument for detailed measurement of the social impact of oral disorders and has potential benefits for clinical decision-making and research.
Abstract: The capacity of dental clinicians and researchers to assess oral health and to advocate for dental care has been hampered by limitations in measurements of the levels of dysfunction, discomfort and disability associated with oral disorders The purpose of this research was to develop and test the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP), a scaled index of the social impact of oral disorders which draws on a theoretical hierarchy of oral health outcomes Forty nine unique statements describing the consequences of oral disorders were initially derived from 535 statements obtained in interviews with 64 dental patients The relative importance of statements within each of seven conceptual subscales was assessed by 328 persons using Thurstone's method of paired comparisons The consistency of their judgements was confirmed (Kendall's mu, P < 005) The reliability of the instrument was evaluated in a cohort of 122 persons aged 60 years and over Internal reliability of six subscales was high (Cronbach's alpha, 070-083) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 042-077) demonstrated stability Validity was examined using longitudinal data from the 60 years and over cohort where the OHIP's capacity to detect previously observed associations with perceived need for a dental visit (ANOVA, p < 005 in five subscales) provided evidence of its construct validity The Oral Health Impact Profile offers a reliable and valid instrument for detailed measurement of the social impact of oral disorders and has potential benefits for clinical decision-making and research

1,841 citations


"Impact of tooth loss related to num..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...Our analyses showed oral health quality of life gradients consistent with the number and position of teeth missing due to oral disease, as measured by the OHIP-14 severity index, when controlling for presence of untreated caries and the reason for using dental services....

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  • ...The outcome for this study was OHRQoL, measured by OHIP severity, i.e., the total OHIP-14 score (sum of the Likert-type responses for the fourteen questions, range 0–56), and OHIP prevalence, i.e., the relative frequency of one or more impacts “often/very often” on OHQoL [9]....

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  • ...Of all these instruments, the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) [13] is the most widely used to assess the impact of oral health on quality life in adults and the elderly [12]....

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  • ...OHRQoL was measured using the OHIP-14....

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  • ...The OHIP-14 intends to assess the dysfunction, discomfort and disability caused by oral condition [10]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The global burden of untreated caries, severe periodontitis, and severe tooth loss in 2010 is reported on and the challenge in responding to the diversity of urgent oral health needs worldwide is highlighted, particularly in developing communities.
Abstract: The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2010 Study produced comparable estimates of the burden of 291 diseases and injuries in 1990, 2005, and 2010. This article reports on the global burden of untreated caries, severe periodontitis, and severe tooth loss in 2010 and compares those figures with new estimates for 1990. We used disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs) metrics to quantify burden. Oral conditions affected 3.9 billion people, and untreated caries in permanent teeth was the most prevalent condition evaluated for the entire GBD 2010 Study (global prevalence of 35% for all ages combined). Oral conditions combined accounted for 15 million DALYs globally (1.9% of all YLDs; 0.6% of all DALYs), implying an average health loss of 224 years per 100,000 population. DALYs due to oral conditions increased 20.8% between 1990 and 2010, mainly due to population growth and aging. While DALYs due to severe periodontitis and untreated caries increased, those due to severe tooth loss decreased. DALYs differed by age groups and regions, but not by genders. The findings highlight the challenge in responding to the diversity of urgent oral health needs worldwide, particularly in developing communities.

1,042 citations


"Impact of tooth loss related to num..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Untreated caries, severe tooth loss and periodontitis were pointed out as being among the 100 conditions that cause burden in the Global Burden Disease [3]....

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  • ...While many countries have seen a decrease in the prevalence of tooth loss, this oral condition still represents a significant health concern among Brazilian adults [2] and in 2010, in the Global Burden Disease study, severe tooth loss was pointed as one of the 100 health conditions causing injuries among populations [3]....

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