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Journal ArticleDOI

Implementing SDG to Village Level by Integrating Social Capital Theory and Value Chain: (Case of Village Tourism Pentingsari in Yogyakarta, Indonesia)

28 Jan 2020-Journal of Asean Studies (Universitas Bina Nusantara)-Vol. 7, Iss: 2, pp 122-137
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that the notion of social capital and value chain management can be used by local leaders to socialize the importance of SDGs at the village level, thus, these two concepts eventually enhance the implementation of sustainable economic activities at the local level.
Abstract: Since the publication of the 2030 blueprint, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been promoted as a global project. Many steps have been taken; however, until now, the achievement remains limited. This is due to the low understanding of SDGs from stakeholders at the local level, such as the village. This study examines how we can develop SDG awareness and implementation in the village level. This article argues that we need to look at two essential factors namely the notion of social capital and value chain management in order to fulfill SDGs at the local level. Arguably, social capital can be mobilized by the local leaders to socialize the importance of SDGs at the village level. Second, value chain management enables local leaders to manage sustainable economic activities at the village level. Hence, these two concepts eventually enhance the implementation of SDGs at the village level. This argument will be illustrated in the case of three tourism village development areas in Yogyakarta namely, Pentingsari in Sleman, Mangunan in Bantul, and Bleberan in Gunungkidul.

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Citations
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06 Nov 2014

48 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focused on the mechanisms of tourism management that work toward achieving the sustainable development goals (SDGs) by employing tourism as a tool, and the Phulomlo of Thailand was selected as a case study.
Abstract: Sustainable tourism has been a mainstream issue of concern, with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development released in 2015. This agenda acknowledged 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that contain a blueprint of urgent action for peace and prosperity for the people and the planet. This paper focuses on the mechanisms of tourism management that work toward achieving the SDGs. There are two mechanisms, a supportive mechanism and an operational mechanism, that address the question of how to achieve the SDGs by employing tourism as a tool, the Phulomlo of Thailand was selected as a case study. Data were collected from local stakeholders through semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, and documentation. The results show that there is a concrete operational mechanismat the local level. However, to attain growth toward sustainability, more thorough promotion of supportive mechanisms should be considered, with a more explicit strategy to facilitate improvement in achieving the SDGs in all areas connected to Phulomlo. Suggestions to enhance the achievement of SDGs in the case of Phulomlo and the connected areas are proposed, as it is important to formulate a practical strategy to accomplish the SDGs via the local network. Furthermore, additional features comprising of consistency in practice, coherence of policies at the national and local level, and collaboration among tourism stakeholders should also be considered.

1 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a literature review and policy review is used to identify infrastructure in the economic corridor towards the SDGs in D. I. Yogyakarta Province, and the study results indicate that infrastructure development is carried out sustainably, but the development has not significantly maximized the Communication and Information Technology infrastructure following the 9th SDGs.
Abstract: The D. I. Yogyakarta government’s vision for maritime-based development continues to be carried out by establishing coastal areas as economic corridors. Infrastructure development continues. This is in line with the government’s commitment to realizing the SDGs. This research aims to identify infrastructure in the economic corridor towards the SDGs in D. I. Yogyakarta Province. The method used in this research is literature review and policy review. The study results indicate that infrastructure development is carried out sustainably, but the development has not significantly maximized the Communication and Information Technology infrastructure following the 9th SDGs. It is necessary to increase access to Communication and Information Technology and provide affordable universal access to all developing countries.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the concept of social capital is introduced and illustrated, its forms are described, the social structural conditions under which it arises are examined, and it is used in an analys...
Abstract: In this paper, the concept of social capital is introduced and illustrated, its forms are described, the social structural conditions under which it arises are examined, and it is used in an analys...

31,693 citations


"Implementing SDG to Village Level b..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…relationships of mutual acquaintance or recognition” (Bourdieu, 1986), whereas Coleman defines it functionalistically as “a variety of entities with two elements in common: they are composed of various social structures, and they facilitate certain actors within the structure” (Coleman, 1988)....

    [...]

  • ...The concept of social capital was popularized by James Coleman (1988) and immediately attracted the attention of academics as a field of study that continued to evolve as well as the basis for the preparation of new policies in an atmosphere that was promarket economy from the 1990s....

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: Putnam as mentioned in this paper showed that changes in work, family structure, age, suburban life, television, computers, women's roles and other factors are isolating Americans from each other in a trend whose reflection can clearly be seen in British society.
Abstract: BOWLING ALONE warns Americans that their stock of "social capital", the very fabric of their connections with each other, has been accelerating down. Putnam describes the resulting impoverishment of their lives and communities. Drawing on evidence that includes nearly half a million interviews conducted over a quarter of a century in America, Putnam shows how changes in work, family structure, age, suburban life, television, computers, women's roles and other factors are isolating Americans from each other in a trend whose reflection can clearly be seen in British society. We sign 30 percent fewer petitions than we did ten years ago. Membership in organisations- from the Boy Scouts to political parties and the Church is falling. Ties with friends and relatives are fraying: we're 35 percent less likely to visit our neighbours or have dinner with our families than we were thirty years ago. We watch sport alone instead of with our friends. A century ago, American citizens' means of connecting were at a low point after decades of urbanisation, industrialisation and immigration uprooted them from families and friends. That generation demonstrated a capacity for renewal by creating the organisations that pulled Americans together. Putnam shows how we can learn from them and reinvent common enterprises that will make us secure, productive, happy and hopeful.

24,532 citations

Book
21 Feb 1986
TL;DR: The first handbook on the sociology of education as discussed by the authors synthesizes major advances in education over the past several decades, incorporating both a systematic review of significant theoretical and empirical work and challenging original contributions by distinguished American, English, and French sociologists.
Abstract: The first of its kind, this handbook synthesizes major advances in the sociology of education over the past several decades. It incorporates both a systematic review of significant theoretical and empirical work and challenging original contributions by distinguished American, English, and French sociologists. In his introduction, John G. Richardson traces the development of the sociology of education and reviews the important classical European works in which this discipline is grounded. Each chapter, devoted to a major topic in the field, provides both a review of the literature and an exposition of an original thesis. The inclusion of subjects outside traditional sociological concern--such as the historical foundations of education and the sociology of special education--gives an interdisciplinary scope that enhances the volume's usefulness.

7,071 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that norms evolve in a three-stage "life cycle" of emergence, cascades, and internalization, and that each stage is governed by different motives, mechanisms, and behavioral logics.
Abstract: Norms have never been absent from the study of international politics, but the sweeping “ideational turn” in the 1980s and 1990s brought them back as a central theoretical concern in the field. Much theorizing about norms has focused on how they create social structure, standards of appropriateness, and stability in international politics. Recent empirical research on norms, in contrast, has examined their role in creating political change, but change processes have been less well-theorized. We induce from this research a variety of theoretical arguments and testable hypotheses about the role of norms in political change. We argue that norms evolve in a three-stage “life cycle” of emergence, “norm cascades,” and internalization, and that each stage is governed by different motives, mechanisms, and behavioral logics. We also highlight the rational and strategic nature of many social construction processes and argue that theoretical progress will only be made by placing attention on the connections between norms and rationality rather than by opposing the two.

5,761 citations


"Implementing SDG to Village Level b..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The next phase is norm cascading, which makes a new norm of entrepreneurship widely spread (Finnemore & Sikkink, 1998)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors trace the evolution of social capital research as it pertains to economic development and identify four distinct approaches the research has taken : communitarian, networks, institutional, and synergy.
Abstract: In the 1990s the concept of social capital defined here as the norms and networks that enable people to act collectively enjoyed a remarkable rise to prominence across all the social science disciplines. The authors trace the evolution of social capital research as it pertains to economic development and identify four distinct approaches the research has taken : communitarian, networks, institutional, and synergy. The evidence suggests that of the four, the synergy view, with its emphasis on incorporating different levels and dimensions of social capital and its recognition of the positive and negative outcomes that social capital can generate, has the greatest empirical support and lends itself best to comprehensive and coherent policy prescriptions. The authors argue that a significant virtue of the idea of and discourse on social capital is that it helps to bridge orthodox divides among scholars, practitioners, and policymakers.

4,094 citations