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Journal ArticleDOI

In Pursuit of Sustainable Educational Development: The Philippines and the English Dilemma

Manav Shah1
01 Jan 2023-Language policy (Language policy)-pp 131-151
TL;DR: The MTB-MLE policy, moving instruction into English and Filipino beyond grade 3, and the pro-English message it conveys, falls short of providing the large and linguistically diverse population of lessprivileged Filipino children with the multilingual skills they need to participate in the local, national and global economies as discussed by the authors .
Abstract: The English language poses a dilemma in meeting the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially for education in countries with high multilingualism, high poverty and unequal schooling, such as the Philippines. This chapter considers Goal 1 (reducing poverty), Goal 4 (promoting educational quality) and Goal 10 (reducing inequalities) in relation to what has become an array of executive orders, regulations and laws that have shifted in the political winds, even as the judiciary has tried to navigate a measured course. It underscores how the primacy of English in the national consciousness, tied to global markets, undercuts multilingual policies based in empirical findings that children learn best in a language that they understand. The current MTB-MLE policy, moving instruction into English and Filipino beyond grade 3, and the pro-English message it conveys, falls short of providing the large and linguistically diverse population of less-privileged Filipino children with the multilingual skills they need to participate in the local, national and global economies. In the end, the policy fails to fully realize the promise of the SDGs in promoting educational quality essential to reducing poverty and inequalities.
References
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MonographDOI
23 Apr 2012
TL;DR: The authors examines the ways in which our ideas about language and identity which used to be framed in national and political terms as a matter of rights and citizenship are increasingly recast in economic terms as added value, and argues that this discursive shift is connected to specific characteristics of the globalized new economy in what can be thought of as late capitalism.
Abstract: This book examines the ways in which our ideas about language and identity which used to be framed in national and political terms as a matter of rights and citizenship are increasingly recast in economic terms as a matter of added value. It argues that this discursive shift is connected to specific characteristics of the globalized new economy in what can be thought of as "late capitalism". Through ten ethnographic case studies, it demonstrates the complex ways in which older nationalist ideologies which invest language with value as a source of pride get bound up with newer neoliberal ideologies which invest language with value as a source of profit. The complex interaction between these modes of mobilizing linguistic resources challenges some of our ideas about globalization, hinting that we are in a period of intensification of modernity, in which the limits of the nation-State are stretched, but not (yet) undone. At the same time, this book argues, this intensification also calls into question modernist ways of looking at language and identity, requiring a more serious engagement with capitalism and how it constitutes symbolic (including linguistic) as well as material markets.

461 citations

Book
01 Jan 1970
TL;DR: The mis-education of the Filipino is discussed in this paper, where it is shown that the mis-learning of the Filipina can be traced back to the early 1970s.
Abstract: (1970). The mis-education of the Filipino. Journal of Contemporary Asia: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 20-36.

100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argues that another effective way to look at language policy is to suspend talk on language, and instead first engage with social development issues where people are at the heart of the social landscape.
Abstract: Fixation on language in language policy debates is not a natural given. In fact, it has to be re-examined. This paper argues that another effective way to look at language policy is to suspend talk on language, and instead first engage with social development issues where people are at the heart of the social landscape. It discusses three ways of engagement with language policy as seen in the landscape of the politics of language, education and social development in the Philippines. The first way is engaging language policy which means debating the key features of the existing language policy usually based on ideological concerns. The second way is re-engaging language policy which highlights previously sidelined provisions of the policy such as those concerning local languages in education. The third way is disengaging from language policy which primarily sees language policy as part of a general social development framework, i.e. the imperative to focus on specific needs of local communities from which the roles of language emerge. The key point to note is that language does not seem to figure as a fundamental problem that needs to be addressed.

18 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, a sulat na ipebpagilay sia su napasadan nu kinapaganad’u ’bpamamandu pantag kanu MTBMLE.
Abstract: Su nia a sulat na ipebpagilay sia su napasadan nu kinapaganad’u ’bpamamandu pantag kanu MTBMLE. Su nalimud a ibpangingidsa na ebpun kanu nakatelu ulan a MTBMLE a kabpangagi kaped’u ‘bpamamandu kanu ikaisa a ‘bpangkatan taman kanu manga mapulu nilan lu kanu manga iskwilan a pedtabangan nu Save the Children sa Mindanao, Pilipinas. Su kinapangingidsa kanu lima kataw kanu ‘bpamamandu sa ikaisa a ‘bpangkatan na unan enggu ulian nu kinapaganad. Na sia kanu nauli den a kinangingidsa na inipatadem kanu namedtalabuk su embalangbalang a napaganadan nilan asal’a katawan u aden kambagu nilan sabap sa entu.

3 citations

Trending Questions (3)
Why filipino stuggle to learn english?

Filipinos struggle to learn English due to policies favoring English over multilingualism, hindering educational quality and perpetuating inequalities, as highlighted in the paper.

How effective are English and Filipino as instruction in improving academic performance in the Philippines?

English and Filipino instruction in the Philippines fall short in improving academic performance due to neglecting multilingual policies, hindering educational quality and perpetuating inequalities, as highlighted in the paper.

Why peole of the philippines keep struggling speaking english language?

The struggle with English in the Philippines is due to policies favoring English over multilingualism, hindering educational quality and perpetuating inequalities, as highlighted in the research.