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Journal IssueDOI

Inclusive interface design for seniors: Image-browsing for a health information context

TL;DR: This study explores an image-based retrieval interface for drug information, focusing on usability for a specific population—seniors, and points to design features that meet seniors' needs in the context of other health-related information-seeking strategies.
Abstract: This study explores an image-based retrieval interface for drug information, focusing on usability for a specific population—seniors. Qualitative, task-based interviews examined participants' health information behaviors and documented search strategies using an existing database () and a new prototype that uses similarity-based clustering of pill images for retrieval. Twelve participants (aged 65 and older), reflecting a diversity of backgrounds and experience with Web-based resources, located pill information using the interfaces and discussed navigational and other search preferences. Findings point to design features (e.g., image enlargement) that meet seniors' needs in the context of other health-related information-seeking strategies (e.g., contacting pharmacists). © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Citations
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Book
19 Apr 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors introduce concepts relevant to Information Behavior Models, Paradigms, and Theories in the study of Information Behavior Methods for Studying Information Behavior Research Results and Reflections.
Abstract: Abbreviated Contents Figures and Tables Preface Introduction and Examples Concepts Relevant to Information Behavior Models, Paradigms, and Theories in the Study of Information Behavior Methods for Studying Information Behavior Research Results and Reflections Appendix: Glossary Appendix: Questions for Discussion and Application References Index

1,347 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A holistic view of the study of computer use by older adults is provided, which provides a synthesis of the findings across these many disciplines, and attempts to highlight any gaps that exist.

632 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Despite widespread positive appraisal of electronic access to PHRs as important, Internet use for tracking PHRs remains uncommon and the digital divide associated with the gap in health literacy must be improved and cultural issues and the doctor-patient relationship need to be studied.
Abstract: Background: Personal health records (PHRs) and the sharing of health information through health information exchange (HIE) have been advocated as key new components in the effective delivery of modern health care. It is important to understand consumer attitudes toward utilization of PHRs and HIE to evaluate the public’s willingness to adopt these new health care tools. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine consumer attitudes toward PHRs and their health care providers’ use of HIE, as well as to evaluate consumer use of the Internet for tracking PHRs. Methods: Analysis of data from the 2007 iteration of the Health Information National Trends Study (HINTS, N=7674) was conducted using multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of consumer (1) appraisal of PHRs, (2) appraisal of health care provider use of HIE, and (3) use of the Internet for tracking PHRs. Results: : Approximately 86% of US adults rated electronic access to their PHRs as important. However, only 9% of them used the Internet for tracking PHRs. Those who rated electronic access to their PHRs as important were more likely to be Hispanic (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 - 1.72) and Internet users (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.02 - 1.57) and less likely to be age 65 and above (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.38 - 0.67) or individuals whose doctors always ensured their understanding of their health (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.49 – 0.78). Those who rated HIE as important were more likely to be 45 to 54 years of age (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.03 - 2.08), 55 to 64 years of age (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.32 - 2.53), or 65 and above (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.27 - 2.43) and less likely to be women (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.68 - 0.95) or individuals who perceive their health information as not safely guarded by their doctors (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.40 - 0.69). Among Internet users, those who used the Internet to track their PHRs were more likely to be college graduates (OR = 1.84, 95% = 1.32 - 2.59) or to have completed some college courses (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.02 - 2.11), to be Hispanic (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.23 - 2.98), or to be individuals with health care provider access (OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.21 - 2.97). Women were less likely to use the Internet for tracking PHRs than men (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.61 - 1.00). Conclusions: Despite widespread positive appraisal of electronic access to PHRs as important, Internet use for tracking PHRs remains uncommon. To promote PHR adoption, the digital divide associated with the gap in health literacy must be improved, and cultural issues and the doctor-patient relationship need to be studied. Further work also needs to address consumer concerns regarding the security of HIE. [J Med Internet Res 2010;12(4):e73]

154 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A working definition of conflicting health information is proposed and a conceptual typology is described to guide future research in this area to help people process conflicting information when making important health decisions.
Abstract: Conflicting health information is increasing in amount and visibility, as evidenced most recently by the controversy surrounding the risks and benefits of childhood vaccinations. The mechanisms through which conflicting information affects individuals are poorly understood; thus, we are unprepared to help people process conflicting information when making important health decisions. In this viewpoint article, we describe this problem, summarize insights from the existing literature on the prevalence and effects of conflicting health information, and identify important knowledge gaps. We propose a working definition of conflicting health information and describe a conceptual typology to guide future research in this area. The typology classifies conflicting information according to four fundamental dimensions: the substantive issue under conflict, the number of conflicting sources (multiplicity), the degree of evidence heterogeneity and the degree of temporal inconsistency.

98 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A computer-based health literacy intervention for older adults was developed and assessed from September 2007 to June 2009 and computer and Web knowledge significantly improved from pre- to post-intervention.

77 citations

References
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Book
01 Dec 1999
TL;DR: Jakob Nielson delivers complete direction on how to connect with any web user, in any situation, with a series of principles that work in support of his findings.
Abstract: From the Publisher: Can you afford to be less knowledgable than your competitors? Over 100,000 Internet professionals around the world have already bought this book. Users experience the usability of a site before they have committed to using it and before they have spent any money on potential purchases. The web is the ultimate environment for empowerment, and he or she who clicks the mouse decides everything. Jakob Nielson, shares with you the full weight of his wisdom and experience. From content and page design to designing for ease of navigation and users with disabilities, Nielsen delivers complete direction on how to connect with any web user, in any situation. Nielsen has arrived at a series of principles that work in support of his findings: 1. that web users want to find what they're after quickly, and 2. if they don't know what they're after, they nevertheless want to browse quickly and access information they come across in a logical manner.

2,054 citations

Book
19 Apr 2012
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors introduce concepts relevant to Information Behavior Models, Paradigms, and Theories in the study of Information Behavior Methods for Studying Information Behavior Research Results and Reflections.
Abstract: Abbreviated Contents Figures and Tables Preface Introduction and Examples Concepts Relevant to Information Behavior Models, Paradigms, and Theories in the Study of Information Behavior Methods for Studying Information Behavior Research Results and Reflections Appendix: Glossary Appendix: Questions for Discussion and Application References Index

1,347 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web is a guide to how to design Web sites and intranets that support growth, management, and ease of use for Webmasters, designers, and anyone else involved in building a Web site.
Abstract: From the Publisher: Some Web sites "work" and some don't Good Web site consultants know that you can't just jump in and start writing HTML, the same way you can't build a house by just pouring a foundation and putting up some walls You need to know who will be using the site, and what they'll be using it for You need some idea of what you'd like to draw their attention to during their visit Overall, you need a strong, cohesive vision for the site that makes it both distinctive and usable Information Architecture for the World Wide Web is about applying the principles of architecture and library science to Web site design Each Web site is like a public building, available for tourists and regulars alike to breeze through at their leisure The job of the architect is to set up the framework for the site to make it comfortable and inviting for people to visit, relax in, and perhaps even return to someday Most books on Web development concentrate either on the aesthetics or the mechanics of the site This book is about the framework that holds the two together With this book, you learn how to design Web sites and intranets that support growth, management, and ease of use Special attention is given to: The process behind architecting a large, complex site Web site hierarchy design and organization Techniques for making your site easier to search Information Architecture for the World Wide Web is for Webmasters, designers, and anyone else involved in building a Web site It's for novice Web designers who, from the start, want to avoid the traps that result in poorly designed sites It's for experienced Web designers who have already created sites but realize that something "is missing" from their sites and want to improve them It's for programmers and administrators who are comfortable with HTML, CGI, and Java but want to understand how to organize their Web pages into a cohesive site The authors are two of the principals of Argus Associates, a Web consulting firm At Argus, they have created information architectures for Web sites and intranets of some of the largest companies in the United States, including Chrysler Corporation, Barron's, and Dow Chemical

1,297 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study shows an extensive multiple drug use among elderly people living at home, and whether thismultiple drug use per se is harmful to the patients or not could not be evaluated in this study.
Abstract: BACKGROUND:More elderly patients affected by severe and chronic diseases are treated in primary care. Reports on the use of prescription drugs by the general elderly population are scarce, and more investigations are needed to optimize pharmaceutical care for these patients.OBJECTIVE:To analyze prescription drug use, diagnoses, and healthcare utilization among noninstitutionalized elderly patients.DESIGN:Retrospective cohort study.SETTING AND PATIENTS:All people ±65 years old (n = 4642) living in the community of Tierp, Sweden, in 1994 were included. Prescription drug use and healthcare utilization have been registered for all inhabitants of the community since 1972. Information about filled prescriptions and diagnoses were obtained from a computerized research register.RESULTS:Prescription drug use was high among the elderly (78%); the most used pharmacologic groups were cardiovascular, nervous system, and gastrointestinal medications. Women used more prescription drugs than men (average 4.8 vs. 3.8) and...

270 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The common use of potentially inappropriate drugs should serve as a reminder to monitor their use closely, and pharmaceutical claims databases can be important tools for accomplishing this task.
Abstract: Background We sought to determine the extent of potentially inappropriate outpatient prescribing for elderly patients, as defined by the Beers revised list of drugs to be avoided in elderly populations. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the outpatient prescription claims database of a large, national pharmaceutical benefit manager. The cohort included 765 423 subjects 65 years or older, who were covered by a pharmaceutical benefit manager and filed 1 or more prescription drug claims during 1999. Main outcome measures were the proportion of subjects who filled a prescription for 1 or more drugs of concern and the proportion of subjects who filled prescriptions for 2 or more of the drugs. Results A total of 162 370 subjects (21%) filled a pre-scription for 1 or more drugs of concern. Amitriptyline and doxepin accounted for 23% of all claims for Beers list drugs, and 51% of those claims were for drugs with the potential for severe adverse effects. More than 15% of subjects filled prescriptions for 2 drugs of concern, and 4% filled prescriptions for 3 or more of the drugs within the same year. The most commonly prescribed classes were psychotropic drugs and neuromuscular agents. Conclusions The common use of potentially inappropriate drugs should serve as a reminder to monitor their use closely. Pharmaceutical claims databases can be important tools for accomplishing this task, though clinical and laboratory data are needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of patient-specific alerts.

209 citations