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Indelible Shadows : Film and the Holocaust

01 Jan 1983-
TL;DR: The authors found an appropriate language for the Hollywood version of the Holocaust and used it to find an appropriate metaphor for the Holocaust in fiction and non-fiction movies, including the personal documentary.
Abstract: Part I. Finding an Appropriate Language: 1. The Hollywood version of the Holocaust 2. Meaningful montage 3. Styles of tension 4. Black humor Part II. Narrative Strategies: 5. The Jew as child 6. In hiding/onstage 7. Beautiful evasions? 8. The condemned and doomed Part III. Responses to Nazi Atrocity: 9. Political resistance 10. The ambiguity of identity 11. The new German guilt Part IV. Shaping Reality: 12. The personal documentary 13. From judgment to illumination Part V. Third Edition Update: 14. The Holocaust as genre 15. Rediscoveries 16. Rescuers in fiction films 17. The ironic touch 18. Dysfunction as distortion: the Holocaust survivor on screen and stage 19. Documentaries of return.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore current trends in the representation of the Holocaust in Israeli popular culture through the analysis of the successful satirical television program: The Chamber Quintet, and argue that the show's subversive and challenging interpretations of traditional Holocaust commemorations indicate a major change in the collective memory of the holocaust.
Abstract: This article explores current trends in the representation of the Holocaust in Israeli popular culture through the analysis of the successful satirical television program: The Chamber Quintet. The article argues that the show's subversive and challenging interpretations of traditional Holocaust commemorations, indicates a major change in the collective memory of the Holocaust. The article explores the cultural role of the show's sketches relating to Holocaust memory by using three perspectives of analysis. The first is a historical–sociological perspective that deals with the development of Holocaust commemoration in Israel. The second perspective deals with the conflict between popular cultural practices and the conventions of Holocaust remembrance. The third perspective deals with the problematic relationship between the content (Holocaust memory) and the form (the genre of humor). Combining these perspectives reveals a dialectical discourse that connects prior voices with new modes of Holocaust represe...

46 citations


Cites background from "Indelible Shadows : Film and the Ho..."

  • ...The issue of commercialization is at the heart of Holocaust television research (Insdorf, 1983: 4; Shandler, 1999: 31–40)....

    [...]

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The authors investigates how history is used in historical documentary films, and argues that the maker of such films constantly negotiates between cognitive, moral, and aesthetic demands, and concludes that history can be used as a kind of escapism.
Abstract: This dissertation investigates how history is used in historical documentary films, and argues that the maker of such films constantly negotiates between cognitive, moral, and aesthetic demands. In ...

34 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In a French arthouse film an Algerian man draws out a large kitchen knife and cuts his own throat as discussed by the authors, and in a short Sri Lankan art video the goddess of destruction, Kali, and a woman soldier surface from the ocean and walk towards a small seaside village.
Abstract: In a French arthouse film an Algerian man draws out a large kitchen knife and cuts his own throat. In a short Sri Lankan art video the goddess of destruction, Kali, and a woman soldier surface from the ocean and walk towards a small seaside village. Shaky images of a video documentary bear witness to the muddied streets and flooded buildings of a poor, black neighbourhood of the Southern United States. In a low-budget Australian film written and directed by an Indigenous filmmaker two homeless, petrol-sniffing Aboriginal youths walk aimlessly on the streets of an outback town. We encounter the modern world and its history via depictions of catastrophe, atrocity, suffering and death. During the past 100 years or so, traumatic historical events and experiences have been re-imagined and re-enacted for us to witness over and over by constantly evolving media and art forms. Perhaps due to the ubiquity and multiplication of such images and narratives in modern and post-modern culture, questions about the impulse to behold and depict both the suffering of others and of the self, as well as more general questions about the ontological status of the representation of trauma, have increasingly been raised within intersecting, inter-disciplinary fields of study over the past two decades.

28 citations