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Journal ArticleDOI

Influencing factors and their influencing mechanisms on urban resilience in China

TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identified 12 key influencing factors through literature review and Delphi method under a 4R (i.e., robustness, rapidity, redundancy, and resourcefulness) framework, and used the DEMATEL and ISM methods to investigate their influencing mechanisms.
About: This article is published in Sustainable Cities and Society.The article was published on 2021-11-01. It has received 41 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Resilience (network) & Urban resilience.
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TL;DR: In this paper , the authors reviewed the most common resilience qualities (RQs), capacities, and dimensions of the built environment and their interdependencies, and concluded that integrated resilience indicators, planning, and design methodology are crucial for incorporating RQs into the framework that influences the built environments.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , a systematic literature review is presented, identifying main crises impacts on the built environment and their solutions, and the main interconnections between the identified crises impacts and solutions were established.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
03 Sep 2022-Land
TL;DR: In this article , an evaluation indicator system for urban resilience in China on four dimensions (economy, environment, society, and infrastructure) was constructed using the entropy weight method to measure the resilience levels of 138 cities in 8 urban agglomerations from 2005 to 2018.
Abstract: This paper constructs an evaluation indicator system for urban resilience in China on four dimensions—economy, environment, society, and infrastructure. The evaluation indicator is used by the entropy weight method to measure the resilience levels of 138 cities in 8 urban agglomerations from 2005 to 2018. Using the Theil index and variance decomposition method, we explore the size and sources of urban resilience differences among the eight urban agglomerations from the dual perspectives of space and structure and employ geographic detectors to identify the driving factors behind their differences. The results show that although the overall resilience level of the eight urban agglomerations is not high, it shows an upward trend. The differences within the eight urban agglomerations are the main spatial sources of urban resilience differences and economic resilience is the main structural source of urban resilience differences. Moreover, economic resilience and social resilience have the greatest contribution and driving effect on the resilience differences of BTH, YRD, PRD, MYR, CC, GP, and HC urban agglomerations, but the difference in resilience of CP is mainly caused by the difference in infrastructure resilience. Compared with the single factor, the impact of the interaction of each factor is even greater.

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Zhang et al. as discussed by the authors employed the TOPSIS method, particle swarm optimization (PSO), and extreme learning machine (ELM) to measure urban resilience from 2010 to 2020.

8 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The traditional view of natural systems, therefore, might well be less a meaningful reality than a perceptual convenience.
Abstract: Individuals die, populations disappear, and species become extinct. That is one view of the world. But another view of the world concentrates not so much on presence or absence as upon the numbers of organisms and the degree of constancy of their numbers. These are two very different ways of viewing the behavior of systems and the usefulness of the view depends very much on the properties of the system concerned. If we are examining a particular device designed by the engineer to perform specific tasks under a rather narrow range of predictable external conditions, we are likely to be more concerned with consistent nonvariable performance in which slight departures from the performance goal are immediately counteracted. A quantitative view of the behavior of the system is, therefore, essential. With attention focused upon achieving constancy, the critical events seem to be the amplitude and frequency of oscillations. But if we are dealing with a system profoundly affected by changes external to it, and continually confronted by the unexpected, the constancy of its behavior becomes less important than the persistence of the relationships. Attention shifts, therefore, to the qualitative and to questions of existence or not. Our traditions of analysis in theoretical and empirical ecology have been largely inherited from developments in classical physics and its applied variants. Inevitably, there has been a tendency to emphasize the quantitative rather than the qualitative, for it is important in this tradition to know not just that a quantity is larger than another quantity, but precisely how much larger. It is similarly important, if a quantity fluctuates, to know its amplitude and period of fluctuation. But this orientation may simply reflect an analytic approach developed in one area because it was useful and then transferred to another where it may not be. Our traditional view of natural systems, therefore, might well be less a meaningful reality than a perceptual convenience. There can in some years be more owls and fewer mice and in others, the reverse. Fish populations wax and wane as a natural condition, and insect populations can range over extremes that only logarithmic

13,447 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a conceptual framework to define seismic resilience of communities and quantitative measures of resilience that can be useful for a coordinated research effort focusing on enhancing this resilience.
Abstract: This paper presents a conceptual framework to define seismic resilience of communities and quantitative measures of resilience that can be useful for a coordinated research effort focusing on enhancing this resilience. This framework relies on the complementary measures of resilience: ‘‘Reduced failure probabilities,’’ ‘‘Reduced consequences from failures,’’ and ‘‘Reduced time to recovery.’’ The framework also includes quantitative measures of the ‘‘ends’’ of robustness and rapidity, and the ‘‘means’’ of resourcefulness and redundancy, and integrates those measures into the four dimensions of community resilience—technical, organizational, social, and economic—all of which can be used to quantify measures of resilience for various types of physical and organizational systems. Systems diagrams then establish the tasks required to achieve these objectives. This framework can be useful in future research to determine the resiliency of different units of analysis and systems, and to develop resiliency targets and detailed analytical procedures to generate these values. [DOI: 10.1193/1.1623497]

3,399 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider the physical and financial implications for urban areas of the potential impacts of climate variability and change on water resources, illustrated by examples from sub-Saharan Africa, which is likely to be one of the most vulnerable and most affected regions.
Abstract: Global warming and related climate changes arelikely to significantly increase the weather-related risks facing human settlements, including floods, water and power supply failures and associated economic collapse into “failed cities”. Action to help poor urban communities adapt to become more resilient to possible change must therefore be initiated, although to date attention has focused on mitigation rather than adaptation. This paper considers the physical and financial implications for urban areas of the potential impacts of climate variability and change on water resources, illustrated by examples from sub-Saharan Africa, which is likely to be one of the most vulnerable and most affected regions. Water management, which will be particularly affected by climate change, could provide an opportunity to initiate structured adaptation responses. Adaptation costs in the sub-Saharan urban water sector are estimated at between 10 and 20 per cent of current overseas development assistance to the region. This ...

520 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A conceptual framework for analysis of sustainability and resilience, then, is described based on three theoretical models, a mitigation model, a recovery model, and a structural-cognitive model.

425 citations