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Book

Information Theory and Network Coding

28 Aug 2008-
TL;DR: This book contains a thorough discussion of the classical topics in information theory together with the first comprehensive treatment of network coding, a subject first emerged under information theory in the mid 1990's that has now diffused into coding theory, computer networks, wireless communications, complexity theory, cryptography, graph theory, etc.
Abstract: This book contains a thorough discussion of the classical topics in information theory together with the first comprehensive treatment of network coding, a subject first emerged under information theory in the mid 1990's that has now diffused into coding theory, computer networks, wireless communications, complexity theory, cryptography, graph theory, etc. With a large number of examples, illustrations, and original problems, this book is excellent as a textbook or reference book for a senior or graduate level course on the subject, as well as a reference for researchers in related fields.
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Book
16 Jan 2012
TL;DR: In this article, a comprehensive treatment of network information theory and its applications is provided, which provides the first unified coverage of both classical and recent results, including successive cancellation and superposition coding, MIMO wireless communication, network coding and cooperative relaying.
Abstract: This comprehensive treatment of network information theory and its applications provides the first unified coverage of both classical and recent results. With an approach that balances the introduction of new models and new coding techniques, readers are guided through Shannon's point-to-point information theory, single-hop networks, multihop networks, and extensions to distributed computing, secrecy, wireless communication, and networking. Elementary mathematical tools and techniques are used throughout, requiring only basic knowledge of probability, whilst unified proofs of coding theorems are based on a few simple lemmas, making the text accessible to newcomers. Key topics covered include successive cancellation and superposition coding, MIMO wireless communication, network coding, and cooperative relaying. Also covered are feedback and interactive communication, capacity approximations and scaling laws, and asynchronous and random access channels. This book is ideal for use in the classroom, for self-study, and as a reference for researchers and engineers in industry and academia.

2,442 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A comprehensive review of the domain of physical layer security in multiuser wireless networks, with an overview of the foundations dating back to the pioneering work of Shannon and Wyner on information-theoretic security and observations on potential research directions in this area.
Abstract: This paper provides a comprehensive review of the domain of physical layer security in multiuser wireless networks. The essential premise of physical layer security is to enable the exchange of confidential messages over a wireless medium in the presence of unauthorized eavesdroppers, without relying on higher-layer encryption. This can be achieved primarily in two ways: without the need for a secret key by intelligently designing transmit coding strategies, or by exploiting the wireless communication medium to develop secret keys over public channels. The survey begins with an overview of the foundations dating back to the pioneering work of Shannon and Wyner on information-theoretic security. We then describe the evolution of secure transmission strategies from point-to-point channels to multiple-antenna systems, followed by generalizations to multiuser broadcast, multiple-access, interference, and relay networks. Secret-key generation and establishment protocols based on physical layer mechanisms are subsequently covered. Approaches for secrecy based on channel coding design are then examined, along with a description of inter-disciplinary approaches based on game theory and stochastic geometry. The associated problem of physical layer message authentication is also briefly introduced. The survey concludes with observations on potential research directions in this area.

1,294 citations


Cites background from "Information Theory and Network Codi..."

  • ...k coding is a paradigm for multi-hop wireline and wireless networks that allows intermediate nodes to ‘mix’ packets or signals received from multiple paths, with the objective of improving throughput [228]. Therefore, such networks are vulnerable to eavesdropping, akin to other networks discussed thus far in this work. The secure network coding problem was introduced in [229] for multicast wireline net...

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Book ChapterDOI
30 May 2011
TL;DR: This survey describes the most important constructions of secret-sharing schemes and explains the connections between secret- sharing schemes and monotone formulae and monOTone span programs, and presents the known lower bounds on the share size.
Abstract: A secret-sharing scheme is a method by which a dealer distributes shares to parties such that only authorized subsets of parties can reconstruct the secret. Secret-sharing schemes are an important tool in cryptography and they are used as a building box in many secure protocols, e.g., general protocol for multiparty computation, Byzantine agreement, threshold cryptography, access control, attribute-based encryption, and generalized oblivious transfer. In this survey, we describe the most important constructions of secret-sharing schemes; in particular, we explain the connections between secret-sharing schemes and monotone formulae and monotone span programs. We then discuss the main problem with known secret-sharing schemes - the large share size, which is exponential in the number of parties. We conjecture that this is unavoidable. We present the known lower bounds on the share size. These lower bounds are fairly weak and there is a big gap between the lower and upper bounds. For linear secret-sharing schemes, which is a class of schemes based on linear algebra that contains most known schemes, super-polynomial lower bounds on the share size are known. We describe the proofs of these lower bounds. We also present two results connecting secret-sharing schemes for a Hamiltonian access structure to the NP vs. coNP problem and to a major open problem in cryptography - constructing oblivious-transfer protocols from one-way functions.

618 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A caching strategy based on deterministic assignment of subpackets of the library files, and a coded delivery strategy where the users send linearly coded messages to each other in order to collectively satisfy their demands are proposed.
Abstract: We consider a wireless device-to-device (D2D) network where communication is restricted to be single-hop. Users make arbitrary requests from a finite library of files and have pre-cached information on their devices, subject to a per-node storage capacity constraint. A similar problem has already been considered in an infrastructure setting, where all users receive a common multicast (coded) message from a single omniscient server (e.g., a base station having all the files in the library) through a shared bottleneck link. In this paper, we consider a D2D infrastructureless version of the problem. We propose a caching strategy based on deterministic assignment of subpackets of the library files, and a coded delivery strategy where the users send linearly coded messages to each other in order to collectively satisfy their demands. We also consider a random caching strategy, which is more suitable to a fully decentralized implementation. Under certain conditions, both approaches can achieve the information theoretic outer bound within a constant multiplicative factor. In our previous work, we showed that a caching D2D wireless network with one-hop communication, random caching, and uncoded delivery (direct file transmissions) achieves the same throughput scaling law of the infrastructure-based coded multicasting scheme, in the regime of large number of users and files in the library. This shows that the spatial reuse gain of the D2D network is order-equivalent to the coded multicasting gain of single base station transmission. It is, therefore, natural to ask whether these two gains are cumulative, i.e., if a D2D network with both local communication (spatial reuse) and coded multicasting can provide an improved scaling law. Somewhat counterintuitively, we show that these gains do not cumulate (in terms of throughput scaling law). This fact can be explained by noticing that the coded delivery scheme creates messages that are useful to multiple nodes, such that it benefits from broadcasting to as many nodes as possible, while spatial reuse capitalizes on the fact that the communication is local, such that the same time slot can be reused in space across the network. Unfortunately, these two issues are in contrast with each other.

598 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: This work reconsider from first principles the general structure of the information that a set of sources provides about a given variable and proposes a definition of partial information atoms that exhaustively decompose the Shannon information in a multivariate system in terms of the redundancy between synergies of subsets of the sources.
Abstract: Of the various attempts to generalize information theory to multiple variables, the most widely utilized, interaction information, suffers from the problem that it is sometimes negative. Here we reconsider from first principles the general structure of the information that a set of sources provides about a given variable. We begin with a new definition of redundancy as the minimum information that any source provides about each possible outcome of the variable, averaged over all possible outcomes. We then show how this measure of redundancy induces a lattice over sets of sources that clarifies the general structure of multivariate information. Finally, we use this redundancy lattice to propose a definition of partial information atoms that exhaustively decompose the Shannon information in a multivariate system in terms of the redundancy between synergies of subsets of the sources. Unlike interaction information, the atoms of our partial information decomposition are never negative and always support a clear interpretation as informational quantities. Our analysis also demonstrates how the negativity of interaction information can be explained by its confounding of redundancy and synergy.

466 citations


Cites background from "Information Theory and Network Codi..."

  • ...In contrast, many of the most interesting and challenging scientific questions, such as many-body problems in physics [2], n-person games in game theory [3], and population coding in neuroscience [4, 5], involve understanding the structure of interactions between three or more variables....

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