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Informational and computational approaches to Land Consolidation

About: The article was published on 2012-05-06 and is currently open access. It has received 23 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Land consolidation.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the feasibility of land consolidation within the customary tenure by juxtaposing the local conditions of the study areas with the baseline conditions for land consolidation outlined in literature is investigated.

73 citations

01 Jan 2016

70 citations


Cites background from "Informational and computational app..."

  • ...Differences in topography and quality of soil affects land reallocation which is the core of land consolidation (Lemmen et al., 2012; Sonnenberg, 2002)....

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  • ...Short-term exchange of farmlands is inconsistent with modern land consolidation as it will contradict with permanent change of ownership rights in the land register (Lemmen et al., 2012)....

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  • ...Modern land consolidation results in change of ownership rights and registration of new titles in the land register (Lemmen et al., 2012)....

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  • ...Sharp changes in topography and high level soil heterogeneity limits the land reallocation process during land consolidation (Lemmen et al., 2012; Sonnenberg, 2002)....

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  • ...Lemmen et al. (2012) indicated that, the initial mono-functionality of land consolidation was to increase agricultural production through parcel enhancement; reduction of production cost and increase in farm efficiency....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results show that Participatory Land Administration can potentially support land consolidation, though further investigation is needed on how it can be integrated into the formal land registration system, into an actual land consolidation project.
Abstract: Land information is one of the basic requirements for land management activities such as land consolidation. However, the dearth of land information on customary lands limits the development and application of land consolidation. This paper presents and discusses the results of an experiment carried out to test the potential of participatory land administration applied on customary lands in support of land consolidation. A brief overview of the evolution of crowdsourced, voluntary, and participatory approaches is provided alongside newly related insights into neogeography and neo-cadastre, and fit-for-purpose and pro-poor land administration. The concept of participatory land administration is then developed in this context. The area of the experiment is in Northern Ghana where the process was developed together with the local farming community. The study involved collecting land information relating to farms over a two-week period, using a mobile app and a satellite image, based on participatory land administration. The results show that Participatory Land Administration can potentially support land consolidation, though further investigation is needed on how it can be integrated into the formal land registration system, into an actual land consolidation project.

48 citations


Cites background from "Informational and computational app..."

  • ...Although the success of land consolidation is dependent, among other things, on the economic and ecological improvements for the land and the people, one of the basic requirements of land consolidation is information related to the ownership, use, and value of the land [2,3]....

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  • ...PLA also allows for the inclusion and collection of other information relevant for land consolidation such as the types of crops that are grown on the farm parcels, as well as the crops that can potentially be grown, the topography of the area, the soil types, as well as the land values of the farm parcels [3,79]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Three different multi-criteria methods were used to determine Cadastral municipalities rankings, which could be used by national agricultural or other spatial planning agencies to increase transparency and effectiveness through information-based decision making.
Abstract: Fragmented agricultural land raises the costs of agricultural production. The land fragmentation manifests as a large number of relatively small and spatially divided land parcels of each owner. Additionally, the parcels are often very irregular in shape, which hinders an effective application of modern agricultural machinery. A land consolidation procedure, i.e., regrouping and merging partitioned agricultural land into larger and more regular parcels, and simultaneously arranging road and canal networks, enables a significant improvement in the conditions of agricultural production. The basis for conducting land consolidation is the legal framework. Multi-annual and annual plans are to specify priority areas for conducting consolidation. These plans should take into consideration the costs and benefits of land consolidation. To ascertain this, it is necessary to determine areas suitable for consolidation and express their qualitative features in a quantitative manner. The aim of this paper is to explore possibilities of using the official registers’ data to broad selection of land consolidation priority areas. To rank the chosen spatial units, various indicators have been selected and calculated at the state level. Multi-criteria analyses are commonly used as a tool for selection of the optimal solution scenario, using possibly conflicting indicators and measures. The paper used three different multi-criteria methods to determine Cadastral municipalities rankings. These rankings could be used by national agricultural or other spatial planning agencies to increase transparency and effectiveness through information-based decision making.

34 citations


Cites background from "Informational and computational app..."

  • ...Modern approaches moved its primary (single) purpose from agricultural sector into the environmental and recreational sectors, creating multi-purpose land consolidation—LC [11]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an approach for land reallocation to support responsible land consolidation on customary lands taking social, cultural, economic, and political factors into consideration is developed. But, the results show that even though the approach is successful to the extent that land fragmentation (physical and legal) is significantly reduced in the study area, social land mobility, land tenure and cultural practices hinder the application of the land re-allocation as this would either increase legal or physical land fragmentation.

32 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the relationship between land administration and land markets, the central economic driver for most countries, and highlight the importance of land administration to the spatial enablement of society.
Abstract: SUMMARY For more than three decades, Ian Williamson, Stig Enemark, and Jude Wallace have been fascinated by land issues. Five years ago Ian and Stig decided to document their lives’ work in the land-related field. Both have a strong cadastral background with Ian having strength in institutions, particularly in the English speaking world, and Stig bringing knowledge of European systems with a focus on land management. They recognized the need for a strong legal perspective, which was provided by Jude, who has spent a lifetime working as a land policy lawyer. All recognized the need for solid technical support, with the expertise provided by Abbas Rajabifard, who has many years of experience in spatial data infrastructure (SDI) and geographic information systems (GIS). The end result is a book titled “Land administration for Sustainable Development” with all authors taking responsibility for the entire text. After a five year journey the book was published by ESRI Press in early 2010. This paper overviews the philosophy of the authors as they explore the concept of land administration for sustainable development. The result is a practical treatise with a strong and universal theoretical foundation that explores the systems that administer the ways people relate to land. The authors believe their experiences are equally of use to both less developed and developed countries. This global context necessitated a holistic view of land administration as a central component of the land management paradigm. The authors have used this paradigm as the theoretical basis for delivering a holistic approach to LAS in support of sustainable development. While the authors recognize that all countries or jurisdictions are unique and have their own needs, they propose ten principles of land administration that are applicable to all countries. Key themes promoted by the authors include the adoption of a toolbox of best practices for designing LAS with general, professional, and emerging tools that are tailored to specific country needs. Also, there is a focus on using common land administration processes as a key to understanding and improving systems. The authors explore the relationship between land administration and land markets, the central economic driver for most countries. The authors conclude by emphasizing the importance of land administration to the spatial enablement of society, where government uses place or location as the key means of organizing information related to activities ranging from health, transportation, and the environment to immigration, taxation, and defense.

405 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In all Central and Eastern European countries (CEECs) land reform has been a key part of the overall agrarian reforms and land reform procedures differ significantly among CEECs as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In all Central and Eastern European countries (CEECs) land reform has been a key part of the overall agrarian reforms and land reform procedures differ significantly among CEECs. This paper, by focusing on distributional effects and political economy implications, explains why thirteen CEEC governments chose particular reform procedures. Key factors in their choices are the history of the land ownership, including the post-collectivization ownership status, length of Communist rule, the ethnicity of pre-collectivization owners, and the equality of pre-collectivization asset distribution. These factors influence the distributional consequences of the land reform, including the (potential) conflicts between efficiency, social equity, and historical justice, and thus the political economy equilibrium.

178 citations

01 Apr 2010
TL;DR: The Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) is under development within the Technical Committee 211 (TC211) of the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) and identified as ISO 19152.
Abstract: The Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) is under development within the Technical Committee 211 (TC211) of the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) and identified as ISO 19152. Within the LADM classical cadastral concepts as “parcel” and “boundary” have been extended to be able to include spatial representations of overlapping tenures or claims and also multidimensional objects (3D and 2D/3D, combined with temporal dimensions). Furthermore, a series of new representations are possible apart from topologically well structured parcels (here called spatial units). Text based, sketch based, point based, line-based, polygon based, or topological based representations of spatial units are possible. The topological spatial units are defined by a consistent topological structure (with no gaps, overlaps or intersections), which is in contrast with a set of polygons, where a consistent topological structure is not guaranteed. A line-based spatial unit is represented by a collection of lines which may be collected from different sources or surveys. A point-based spatial unit contains only the coordinates of the unit’s reference point. A text based spatial unit is not represented by coordinates, but has a spatial unit description in words, e.g. the metes and bounds system (a spatial unit description in terms of distance, direction, and landmarks). All these spatial units may have a 3D representation, and a provision is made for a mixture of 2D and 3D spatial units to co-exist. A level is a collection of spatial units with a geometric or thematic coherence. The concept of level is related to the notion of “legal independence” from ‘Cadastre 2014’. This allows for the flexible introduction of spatial data from different sources and accuracies, including utility networks, buildings and other 3D spatial units, such as mining claims, or construction works. The paper explores the LADM spatial component, which is further based on ISO standards, combined with new concepts as “boundary face string” and partially unbounded primitives. Spatial profiles and the different spatial representations are used to demonstrate the flexibility of spatial representations of this domain model; for formal and non formal land administrations systems alike. The first trial implementation of the Queensland (Australia) Digital Cadastral Database (DCDB) for 2D parcel encoding using the line-based spatial profile will be discussed in detail, together with the polygon based spatial profile for the spatial units of the Portuguese land administration.

66 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

41 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...Large scale land consolidation is under process in Turkey, see Jansen et al, (2010)....

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  • ...The Netherlands (Kik, 1971, 1975, 1979), (Lemmen and Sonnenberg, 1986), (Van Beek and Wientjes-Van Rij 1980) and (Van der Schans, 1971), - Morocco (Essadiki, 2002), and: - Turkey (Ayranci, 2007, Kusek, G., (presented at a GIS conference in Tirana, Albania) and Cay et al., 2006)....

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  • ...It is very interesting to see that further developments take place in Turkey today....

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