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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1186/S12935-020-01686-X

Inhibition of cancer cell-derived exosomal microRNA-183 suppresses cell growth and metastasis in prostate cancer by upregulating TPM1

02 Mar 2021-Cancer Cell International (BioMed Central)-Vol. 21, Iss: 1, pp 145-145
Abstract: Emerging evidence continues to highlight the significant role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of cancer growth and metastasis. Herein, the current study aimed to elucidate the role of exosomal miR-183 in prostate cancer development. Initially, public microarray-based gene expression profiling of prostate cancer was employed to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. The putative target gene TPM1 of miR-183 was subsequently predicted, followed by the application of a luciferase reporter assay and examination of the expression patterns in prostate cancer patients and cell lines. The effects of miR-183 and TPM1 on processes such as cell proliferation, invasion and migration were evaluated using in vitro gain- and loss-of-function experiments. The effect of PC3 cells-derived exosomal miR-183 was validated in LNCaP cells. In vivo experiments were also performed to examine the effect of miR-183 on prostate tumor growth. High expression of miR-183 accompanied with low expression of TPM1 was detected in prostate cancer. Our data indicated that miR-183 could target and downregulate TPM1, with the overexpression of miR-183 and exosomal miR-183 found to promote cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in prostate cancer. Furthermore, the tumor-promoting effect of exosome-mediated delivery of miR-183 was subsequently confirmed in a tumor xenograft model. Taken together, the key findings of our study demonstrate that prostate cancer cell-derived exosomal miR-183 enhance prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration via the downregulation of TPM1, highlighting a promising therapeutic target against prostate cancer.

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Topics: Prostate cancer (62%), LNCaP (61%), Cancer (61%) ... read more
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5 results found


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.CELLSIG.2021.110113
Abstract: Prostate cancer-related deaths are mostly caused by metastasis, which indicates the importance of identifying clinical prognostic biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the expression profile of exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) derived from metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) cell lines (LNCaP and PC-3). miRNA signatures in exosomes and cells were evaluated by miRNA microarray analysis. Fourteen miRNAs were identified as candidates for specific noninvasive biomarkers. The expression of five miRNAs was validated using RT-qPCR, which confirmed that miR-205-5p, miR-148a-3p, miR-125b-5p, miR-183-5p, and miR-425-5p were differentially expressed in mPCa exosomes. Bioinformatic analyses showed that miR-425-5p was associated with residual tumor, pathologic T and N stages, and TP53 status in PCa samples. Gene ontology analysis of negatively correlated and predicted targeted genes showed enrichment of genes related to bone development pathways. The LinkedOmics database indicated that the potential target HSPB8 has a significant negative correlation with miR-425-5p. In conclusion, this study identified a panel of exosomal miRNAs with potential value as prognostic biomarkers for prostate cancer.

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Topics: Prostate cancer (53%), LNCaP (53%), Exosome (53%) ... read more

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1186/S12885-021-08431-1
Chao Chen1, Yan Qun Liu1, Shi Xiang Qiu1, Ya Li1  +3 moreInstitutions (1)
11 Jun 2021-BMC Cancer
Abstract: BACKGROUNDS Liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most malignant tumors, of which prognosis is unsatisfactory in most cases and metastatic of HCC often results in poor prognosis. In this study, we aimed to construct a metastasis- related mRNAs prognostic model to increase the accuracy of prediction of HCC prognosis. METHODS Three hundred seventy-four HCC samples and 50 normal samples were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, involving transcriptomic and clinical data. Metastatic-related genes were acquired from HCMBD website at the same time. Two hundred thirty-three samples were randomly divided into train dataset and test dataset with a proportion of 1:1 by using caret package in R. Kaplan-Meier method and univariate Cox regression analysis and lasso regression analysis were performed to obtain metastasis-related mRNAs which played significant roles in prognosis. Then, using multivariate Cox regression analysis, a prognostic prediction model was established. Transcriptome and clinical data were combined to construct a prognostic model and a nomogram for OS evaluation. Functional enrichment in high- and low-risk groups were also analyzed by GSEA. An entire set based on The International Cancer Genome Consortium(ICGC) database was also applied to verify the model. The expression levels of SLC2A1, CDCA8, ATG10 and HOXD9 are higher in tumor samples and lower in normal tissue samples. The expression of TPM1 in clinical sample tissues is just the opposite. RESULTS One thousand eight hundred ninety-five metastasis-related mRNAs were screened and 6 mRNAs were associated with prognosis. The overall survival (OS)-related prognostic model based on 5 MRGs (TPM1,SLC2A1, CDCA8, ATG10 and HOXD9) was significantly stratified HCC patients into high- and low-risk groups. The AUC values of the 5-gene prognostic signature at 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years were 0.786,0.786 and 0.777. A risk score based on the signature was a significantly independent prognostic factor (HR = 1.434; 95%CI = 1.275-1.612; P < 0.001) for HCC patients. A nomogram which incorporated the 5-gene signature and clinical features was also built for prognostic prediction. GSEA results that low- and high-risk group had an obviously difference in part of pathways. The value of this model was validated in test dataset and ICGC database. CONCLUSION Metastasis-related mRNAs prognostic model was verified that it had a predictable value on the prognosis of HCC, which could be helpful for gene targeted therapy.

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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/S41392-021-00779-X
Chen Li1, Yu-Qing Ni1, Hui Xu1, Qun-Yan Xiang1  +5 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Exosomes play a role as mediators of cell-to-cell communication, thus exhibiting pleiotropic activities to homeostasis regulation. Exosomal non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), mainly microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and circular RNAs (circRNAs), are closely related to a variety of biological and functional aspects of human health. When the exosomal ncRNAs undergo tissue-specific changes due to diverse internal or external disorders, they can cause tissue dysfunction, aging, and diseases. In this review, we comprehensively discuss the underlying regulatory mechanisms of exosomes in human diseases. In addition, we explore the current knowledge on the roles of exosomal miRNAs, lncRNAs, and circRNAs in human health and diseases, including cancers, metabolic diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases, to determine their potential implication in biomarker identification and therapeutic exploration.

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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/IJMS222212204
Yuju Zhou1, Ying Zhang1, Huan Gong1, Siqi Luo1  +1 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Exosomes are very small extracellular vesicles secreted by multiple cell types and are extensively distributed in various biological fluids. Recent research indicated that exosomes can participate in regulating the tumor microenvironment and impacting tumor proliferation and progression. Due to the extensive enrollment in cancer development, exosomes have become a focus of the search for a new therapeutic method for cancer. Exosomes can be utilized for the therapeutic delivery of small molecules, proteins and RNAs to target cancer cells with a high efficiency. Exosome-carried proteins, lipids and nucleic acids are being tested as promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, even as potential treatment targets for cancer. Moreover, different sources of exosomes exhibit multiple performances in cancer applications. In this review, we elaborate on the specific mechanism by which exosomes affect the communication between tumors and the microenvironment and state the therapeutic and diagnostic applications of exosomes in cancers.

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Topics: Tumor microenvironment (53%), Microvesicles (53%), Cancer (51%)

Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3389/FONC.2021.722922
Alfredo Cappariello1, Nadia Rucci1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Bone is a very dynamic tissue hosting different cell types whose functions are regulated by a plethora of membrane-bound and soluble molecules. Intercellular communication was recently demonstrated to be also sustained by the exchange of extracellular vesicles (EVs). These are cell-derived nanosized structures shuttling biologically active molecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins. The bone microenvironment is a preferential site of primary and metastatic tumors, in which cancer cells find a fertile soil to "seed and blossom". Nowadays, many oncogenic processes are recognized to be sustained by EVs. For example, EVs can directly fuel the vicious cycle in the bone/bone marrow microenvironment. EVs create a favourable environment for tumor growth by affecting osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, adipocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells. At the same time other crucial tumor-mediated events, such as the premetastatic niche formation, tumor cell dormancy, as well as drug resistance, have been described to be fostered by tumor-derived EVs. In this review, we will discuss the main body of literature describing how the cancer cells use the EVs for their growth into the bone and for educating the bone microenvironment to host metastases.

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Topics: Bone marrow (50%)
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32 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1146/ANNUREV-PATHOL-012513-104715
Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that typically inhibit the translation and stability of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), controlling genes involved in cellular processes such as inflammation, cell-cycle regulation, stress response, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. Thus, miRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of virtually all signaling circuits within a cell, and their dysregulation has been shown to play an essential role in the development and progression of cancer. Here, after a brief description of miRNA genomics, biogenesis, and function, we discuss the effects of miRNA dysregulation in the cellular pathways that lead to the progressive conversion of normal cells into cancer cells and the potential to develop new molecular miRNA-targeted therapies.

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Topics: Gene silencing (61%), microRNA (53%), Microvesicles (51%)

1,485 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1073/PNAS.0808263106
Abstract: The highly aggressive character of melanoma makes it an excellent model for probing the mechanisms underlying metastasis, which remains one of the most difficult challenges in treating cancer. We find that miR-182, member of a miRNA cluster in a chromosomal locus (7q31-34) frequently amplified in melanoma, is commonly up-regulated in human melanoma cell lines and tissue samples; this up-regulation correlates with gene copy number in a subset of melanoma cell lines. Moreover, miR-182 ectopic expression stimulates migration of melanoma cells in vitro and their metastatic potential in vivo, whereas miR-182 down-regulation impedes invasion and triggers apoptosis. We further show that miR-182 over-expression promotes migration and survival by directly repressing microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-M and FOXO3, whereas enhanced expression of either microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-M or FOXO3 blocks miR-182's proinvasive effects. In human tissues, expression of miR-182 increases with progression from primary to metastatic melanoma and inversely correlates with FOXO3 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor levels. Our data provide a mechanism for invasion and survival in melanoma that could prove applicable to metastasis of other cancers and suggest that miRNA silencing may be a worthwhile therapeutic strategy.

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Topics: Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (55%), Melanoma (55%), Gene silencing (55%) ... read more

506 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.EURURO.2014.07.035
Xiaoyi Huang1, Tiezheng Yuan1, Meihua Liang2, Meijun Du1  +17 moreInstitutions (5)
01 Jan 2015-European Urology
Abstract: Background Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) embedded in circulating exosomes may serves as prognostic biomarkers in cancer.

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Topics: Cancer (53%), Exosome (53%), Prostate cancer (52%)

406 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-3053
Jinsong Li1, Hong-Zhang Huang, Lijuan Sun, Mei Yang  +8 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Purpose: We aim to examine miR-21 expression in tongue squamous cell carcinomas (TSCC) and correlate it with patient clinical status, and to investigate its contribution to TSCC cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Experimental Design: MicroRNA profiling was done in 10 cases of TSCC with microarray. MiR-21 overexpression was quantitated with quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in 103 patients, and correlated to the pathoclinical status of the patients. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of TPM1 and PTEN , and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP labeling to evaluate apoptosis. Moreover, miR-21 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was transfected in SCC-15 and CAL27 cell lines, and tumor cell growth was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, adherent colony formation, and soft agar assay, whereas apoptosis was determined by Annexin V assay, cytochrome c release, and caspase 3 assay. Tumorigenesis was evaluated by xenografting SCC-15 cells in nude mice. Results: MiR-21 is overexpressed in TSCC relative to adjacent normal tissues. The level of miR-21 is reversely correlated with TPM1 and PTEN expression and apoptosis of cancer cells. Multivariate analysis showed that miR-21 expression is an independent prognostic factor indicating poor survival. Inhibiting miR-21 with ASO in TSCC cell lines reduces survival and anchorage-independent growth, and induces apoptosis in TSCC cell lines. Simultaneous silencing of TPM1 with siRNA only partially recapitulates the effect of miR-21 ASO. Furthermore, repeated injection of miR-21 ASO suppresses tumor formation in nude mice by reducing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Conclusions: miR-21 is an independent prognostic indicator for TSCC, and may play a role in TSCC development by inhibiting cancer cell apoptosis partly via TPM1 silencing.

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Topics: Apoptosis Inhibitor (56%), Cell growth (53%), Cancer cell (52%) ... read more

373 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.JCONREL.2015.06.029
Lara Milane1, Amit Singh1, George Mattheolabakis1, Megha Suresh1  +1 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: It is clear that exosomes (endosome derived vesicles) serve important roles in cellular communication both locally and distally and that the exosomal process is abnormal in cancer. Cancer cells are not malicious cells; they are cells that represent 'survival of the fittest' at its finest. All of the mutations, abnormalities, and phenomenal adaptations to a hostile microenvironment, such as hypoxia and nutrient depletion, represent the astute ability of cancer cells to adapt to their environment and to intracellular changes to achieve a single goal - survival. The aberrant exosomal process in cancer represents yet another adaptation that promotes survival of cancer. Cancer cells can secrete more exosomes than healthy cells, but more importantly, the content of cancer cells is distinct. An illustrative distinction is that exosomes derived from cancer cells contain more microRNA than healthy cells and unlike exosomes released from healthy cells, this microRNA can be associated with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) which is required for processing mature and biologically active microRNA. Cancer derived exosomes have the ability to transfer metastatic potential to a recipient cell and cancer exosomes function in the physical process of invasion. In this review we conceptualize the aberrant exosomal process (formation, content selection, loading, trafficking, and release) in cancer as being partially attributed to cancer specific differences in the endocytotic process of receptor recycling/degradation and plasma membrane remodeling and the function of the endosome as a signaling entity. We discuss this concept and, to advance comprehension of exosomal function in cancer as mediators of communication, we detail and discuss exosome biology, formation, and communication in health and cancer; exosomal content in cancer; exosomal biomarkers in cancer; exosome mediated communication in cancer metastasis, drug resistance, and interfacing with the immune system; and discuss the therapeutic manipulation of exosomal content for cancer treatment including current clinical trials of exosomal therapeutics. Often referred to as cellular nanoparticles, understanding exosomes, and how cancer cells use these cellular nanoparticles in communication is at the cutting edge frontier of advancing cancer biology.

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Topics: Exosome (65%), Cancer (57%), Cancer cell (55%) ... read more

373 Citations