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Journal ArticleDOI

Institutional approaches for building intercultural understanding into the curriculum: an Australian perspective

14 Jun 2017-Journal of Geography in Higher Education (Routledge)-Vol. 41, Iss: 4, pp 475-487
TL;DR: The authors examines how Australia has developed policy that has enabled education to become its third largest export market worth more than AUD18 billion in 2014-2015 and gives an overview of some of the institutional strategies and policies that have been implemented at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT University) at university level and geospatial science undergraduate discipline level.
Abstract: Australia is one of the most culturally diverse countries in the world. Since World War II, seven million immigrants from more than 150 countries have settled in Australia. Since that time, Federal governmental changes to its policies on immigration has recognized the importance of cultural diversity in its population. Educational institutions have also responded by initiating a variety of strategies and developing curricula aimed at achieving equitable education and social outcomes and promote the acceptance of people from ethnically diverse backgrounds. This paper first examines how Australia has developed policy that has enabled education to become its third largest export market worth more than AUD18 billion in 2014-2015. It focuses on some of the state and federal government policies that have encouraged the internationalization within the primary, secondary and tertiary education sectors and then gives an overview of some of the institutional strategies and policies that have been implemented at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT University) at university level and geospatial science undergraduate discipline level. A range of challenges at the governmental, institutional and discipline level faced by those individual academics wishing to incorporate internationalization into their respective curricula are investigated.
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01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: A Global Outlook of LIS marketing practices and efforts from around the globe is presented in this article, which highlights a variety of exemplary lis marketing practices, efforts, and strategies.
Abstract: With contributions from library and information professionals (practitioners, researchers, faculty members, consultants, and others), Marketing Library and Information Services: A Global Outlook highlights a variety of exemplary LIS marketing practices and efforts from around the globe. The following broad topics are explored: changing marketing concepts; marketing library and information services in different countries; marketing library and information services in different kind of libraries; web-based LIS marketing, etc.

40 citations

24 Nov 2018
Abstract: This study focuses on the potential of objects in craftwork activities, specifically in wooden boat building. Following Marchand (2009), traditional crafts are understood as being primarily direct and un-alienated work. The monograph addresses two polar trends in scientific conceptualisations of craftwork: eliminating objects from skill-focused analyses of crafts (Sennett, 2008) and eliminating the cultural and historical potential of objects in craftwork (Risatti, 2007). Objects appear as entities, defining craft, primarily through their practical physical functions (Risatti, 2007). Conceptualising the unifying ability of craft objects only in terms of their practical physical function makes them indistinguishable from objects in other modes of production. This situation requires putting the unifying potential of objects in craftwork into a broader perspective. This study analyses the object as an intercultural and intertemporal unifying factor. Here, history refers to the chronological record of events embodied in an activity. Culture refers to shared features developed in a particular geographical locality where the activity in question is situated. This study aims to move beyond general interpretations of craft revival using cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), with the core principle of the approach being a focus on concrete activities, specifically object-orientedness (Leontiev, 1978; Engeström, 2015b). The notion of an object of activity helps to ground motivation in the objective world and facilitates an understanding of why people do things. In this study, the notion of an object is used as an entity for anchoring crafts — as a way to understand concrete cases of craft revival. CHAT was put into discussion with two theoretical approaches, both of which have similar aims of understanding the role of objects in the emergence of social and subjective phenomena. Actor-network theory (Latour, 1996a, 2005) deals with humans and nonhumans as actor-networks in heterogeneous socio-technical networks, and the epistemic approach proposed by Karin Knorr Cetina (1997) deals with epistemic objects as centres of socialities. The general research question for the study is as follows: what is the potential of an object in reviving and preserving crafts? This general research question is analysed through two specific secondary research questions: 1. What is the potential of an object in craft as a unifying factor across cultures? 2. What is the potential of an object in craft as a unifying factor across history? The methodological approach of CHAT constitutes the methodological framework of the study (Engeström, 2015a, 2015b). The data were collected by means of a longitudinal, multi-sited ethnographic approach (Falzon, 2016; Marcus, 1995). Interviews offered the opportunity to extend a present-focused ethnography into the past and future by introducing a subjective and historical perspective (Gubrium & Holstein, 2005). The photo-elicitation interview method (Harper, 2002) was used as an instrument to establish dialogue between two distant groups of boat builders. Qualitative data analysis methods, specifically thematic analysis, were used to analyse the data. The data for the study come from three wooden shipyards in Finland, Russia and India, collected between 2012 and 2014. All the shipyards were producing similar usable wooden vessels at the time. The Finnish research site was a shipyard in the Suomenlinna fortress. Professionals, working in the dockyard as entrepreneurs, included a shipwright, several skilled boat builders and a number of apprentices. Boat builders repair, restore and construct a variety of vessels — from small boats to old galleass — on the premises of the Suomenlinna shipyard. One recent major project was the construction of a replica of an 18th-century rowing gunboat named Diana. The Russian research site was the Solovetsky Shipyard, situated on Solovetsky Islands in the White Sea. The shipyard is part of the Maritime Museum, where a replica of a 17th-century historical ship named St. Peter was a central part of museum’s exhibit. A group of mostly amateur carpenters carried out all the work, including wooden, metal and electrical work. The Indian research site was located in the village of Frasergunj in the state of West Bengal. It involved assessing how one of the building crews constructed large wooden fishing and cargo boats following traditional techniques and design. The building crew, consisting of up to ten men, was quite hierarchical, with knowledge and skills being transferred in a traditional master-apprentice manner. The potential of the object as a unifying factor across cultures was traced in the process of exploration of prospects for constructing object-oriented intercultural understanding between the Finnish and the Indian boat builders by the means of photo-elicitation interview. Building sustainable understanding was conceptualized through the process of construction of a shared object. The potential of the object as a unifying factor across cultures was that the object of activity was able to expand across cultures. The expansion of the object happened through differences in the object, which were essential for an attempt to establish understanding between practitioners from two different cultures. The potential of the objects as unifying factors across history was studied through analysing the role of objects in the historical development of activities. Analysis focused on interviews with those involved in two cases of historic wooden boat building in Finland and Russia. The potential of the object of activity, which acted as an intermediary object in the historical development of such an activity, resides in its ability to compress the efforts of the subjects at a specific point of the activity. This compression powers the development of activity across time. By working on the object, subjects propel history forward. The historical development of craft activities in the data appears as a heterogeneous intertwining of four lines of history. The movement across one particular line occurs through resolving tensions and conflicts by working on an intermediary object — a certain instantiation of the general object of wooden boat building. The potential of the object in craft is that the object of activity instantiates differently in various concrete cultural and historical circumstances, specifically through cultural and historical features accumulated across time and space. Study of the object of activity offers the possibility to compress human efforts into a certain point of time and cultural moment, and thus, to expand activities across temporal and cultural boundaries. The unifying factor of the object in craft resides precisely in its diversity, in its cultural and historical features or differences, formed by specific local circumstances. The primary contradiction in the craft of wooden boat building is the movement between adhering to old ways (following the ancient craft or even replicating history) and responding to new practices (building a boat that satisfies market demands). This constant back-and-forth movement becomes visible in the everyday work of craftsmen as certain tensions and struggles arise. Wooden boats mediate the relationships both within and across communities of craft workers. They are a way to make history and culture tangible and alive, transferring it further into the future. Potential future research may be in analysing how digital technologies are utilised in craftwork and how they are transforming the intentionality and socio-materiality of traditional crafts.

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors define university internationalization as an institution's response to the globalization of our world, which can be viewed as a process of changing the student experience in respon...
Abstract: Killick (2015) defines university internationalization as an institution’s “response to the globalization of our world” which can be viewed as a process of changing the student experience in respon...

20 citations


Cites background from "Institutional approaches for buildi..."

  • ...The structure of this Symposium starts with the large-scale, national perspective (Arrowsmith & Mandla, 2017), collaborations between countries (Clark & Wilson, 2017) and institutional strategies (Hudson & Hinman, 2017), in particular the use of visiting academics (Churski, Paweł Motek,…...

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Book ChapterDOI
19 Apr 2018

8 citations

01 Jan 2018

6 citations


Cites background from "Institutional approaches for buildi..."

  • ...Another component of integrating international content into the curriculum getting a lot of attention by scholars is the use of technology (Arrowsmith & Mandla, 2017)....

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  • ...The use of technology has facilitated international education and the sharing of curriculum and ideas to internationalize the curriculum (Arrowsmith & Mandla, 2017)....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors reviewed the strategies suggested by Western universities to achieve internationalisation of the curriculum and found that course developers are challenged to design a curriculum that serves global rather than national priorities, which does not rely on prior knowledge of local provenance.
Abstract: Responding to the globalisation of commerce and communication and driven by competition in the multi-billion dollar international market for higher education, many universities are seeking to market their educational provision internationally. Feedback from some disappointed 'customers' has created pressure for change in the way that instruction is designed and delivered. This pressure is beginning to affect teachers in subjects perceived as international in perspective. This paper reviews the strategies suggested by Western universities to achieve internationalisation of the curriculum. Internationalisation is a major project that affects all aspects of a university's provision, including its priorities for staff development and career rewards. The challenge for course developers is to design a curriculum that serves global rather than national priorities, which does not rely on prior knowledge of local provenance, where students from all sources share equal opportunities for advancement in an inclusive ...

228 citations


"Institutional approaches for buildi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…noted by Solem et al. (2006), and the costs and time associated with development of suitable internationalization curricula initiatives (Haigh, 2002), are all going to be challenges that need to be considered by those wishing to develop or enhance internationalization with their…...

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  • ...(2006), and the costs and time associated with development of suitable internationalization curricula initiatives (Haigh, 2002), are all going to be challenges that need to be considered by those wishing to develop or enhance internationalization with their respective institutions....

    [...]

Book ChapterDOI
24 Sep 2003
TL;DR: Fundamental differences between the two conceptual systems at the basic level are found, supporting the notion that people from different places and cultures may use different categories for geographic features.
Abstract: This paper describes categories for landscape elements in the language of the Yindjibarndi people, a community of Indigenous Australians. Yindjibarndi terms for topographic features were obtained from dictionaries, and augmented and refined through discussions with local language experts in the Yindjibarndi community. In this paper, the Yindjibarndi terms for convex landforms and for water bodies are compared to English-language terms used to describe the Australian landscape, both in general terms and in the AUSLIG Gazetteer. The investigation found fundamental differences between the two conceptual systems at the basic level, supporting the notion that people from different places and cultures may use different categories for geographic features.

132 citations


"Institutional approaches for buildi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Yindjibarndi believe that small pools of permanent water were formed by the river spirit (warlu) and therefore deserve proper respect (Mark & Turk, 2003)....

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  • ...For example, Mark and Turk (2003) show that for categorizing water courses in English as either permanent or temporary, are different kinds of features in the Yindjibarndi Indigenous community of north Western Australia....

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  • ...Differing geographic concepts and their close link between spirituality and topography are reflected in Indigenous Australian culture (Mark & Turk, 2003)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the varying mixes of geographical knowledge, technical competencies and personal attributes that graduates require, before examining the implications on the design of geography curricula and learning practices.
Abstract: The nature and mission of universities have changed over the past two decades. The move towards mass education with decreased levels of state support has come with greater levels of accountability to stakeholders, including students, employers and the state itself. Graduates are expected to exhibit greater degrees of employability: that is they are more likely to gain and maintain employment, and to progress in workplaces and build careers. In this paper, we discuss the varying mixes of geographical knowledge, technical competencies and personal attributes that graduates require, before examining the implications on the design of geography curricula and learning practices.

77 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 2005-Area
TL;DR: The authors assesses whether geographers have a predominant learning style and whether this varies between and within countries, based on over 900 geography students from 12 universities in Australia, New Zealand, the UK and the US, who completed Kolb's Learning Style Inventory.
Abstract: Growing diversity is focusing attention on the range of different student learning styles. This study assesses whether geographers have a predominant learning style and whether this varies between and within countries. The findings are based on over 900 geography students from 12 universities in Australia, New Zealand, the UK and the US, who completed Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI). The implications for curriculum design and student learning strategies are discussed. It is suggested that departments should aim to produce balanced learners with a full range of learning capacities rather than simply matching teaching to existing learning styles.

64 citations

27 Feb 2013

47 citations


"Institutional approaches for buildi..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…location with its proximity to the burgeoning middle classes in South East Asia, and its international recognition for high-quality teaching and research, is the world’s third most significant destination for international tertiary students behind the USA and the UK (Universities Australia, 2013)....

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