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Journal ArticleDOI

Interactive television in psychiatry

01 May 1992-The Psychiatrist (The Royal College of Psychiatrists)-Vol. 16, Iss: 5, pp 288-291

AboutThis article is published in The Psychiatrist.The article was published on 1992-05-01 and is currently open access. It has received 5 citation(s) till now. The article focuses on the topic(s): Television director & Interactive television.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
C J Ball, Paul McLaren1, A. B. Summerfield1, Maurice Lipsedge1, J P Watson1 
TL;DR: There were few significant differences between communication modes when using single measures; only multiple levels of analysis can adequately assess the differences between such modes of communication.
Abstract: The process and outcome of clinical tasks in an acute psychiatric unit were compared using four different communication modes: face to face, telephone, hands-free telephone, and a low-cost videoconferencing system. Six doctors and six patients took part in the study. Four assessment measures were used. The videoconferencing system was positively received by both patients and doctors. Both doctors and patients preferred communication modes with visual cues. However, there were few significant differences between communication modes when using single measures; only multiple levels of analysis can adequately assess the differences between such modes of communication.

70 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The aim was to get a detailed description of professional user responses to using the system for assessing patients for psychotherapy as a preliminary to a clinical trial.
Abstract: Despite the increased availability of psychotherapy within the NHS, inequalities remain (Holmes & Lindley, 1989). Traditionally, psychotherapy ser vices have been provided from teaching centres in cities and patients have had to travel for treatment. This may account in part for the middle-class predo minance in psychotherapy patients and Holmes ( 1991) has identified the need for psychotherapists to reach out and cater for the disadvantaged in large housing estates and rural areas. While services are changing to meet such needs (Pedder, 1989)there are powerful economic restrictions on service expansion. The potential for communications technology such as interactive television to aid the delivery of general psychiatric services has been reviewed by McLaren et al (1992) and similar arguments apply to the delivery of psychotherapy. This study was performed as part of a project to use a new communications technology, computer based interactive television, to aid the delivery of psychiatric services including psychotherapy. The aim was to get a detailed description of professional user responses to using the system for assessing patients for psychotherapy as a preliminary to a clinical trial.

6 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Findings appear to indicate that a telephone consultancy service can provide a counselling service and highlight community resources that may be overlooked by other agencies – therefore it is important to bolster awareness of the service itself on a periodic basis amongst potential users.
Abstract: Objective: An audit was carried out to evaluate the performance of a telephone consultancy service in adolescent psychiatry. Its objective was to answer the following questions: What does a telephone consultancy service actually do? Is it worth having? If so, how can we improve it? Method: Proforma data sheets on 69 consecutive calls to the Telephone Consultancy Service over a 16-month period were analysed. Results: Seventy-seven percent of enquirers used the service to request a referral or to ask about the appropriateness of referral but only 46% of enquiries were responded to in this way. Twenty-two percent of enquiries were given counselling or advice on how to proceed with the cases themselves. Almost 50% of calls came from the social work department and they enquired principally about conduct problems (27% of their calls) and sexual abuse victims (18% of their calls). General practitioners infrequently used the service (7 calls over a 16-month period). Conclusions: These findings appear to indicate that a telephone consultancy service can provide a counselling service and highlight community resources that may be overlooked by other agencies. However, infrequent use of the service by general practitioners suggests that there has been poor dissemination of information about the service – therefore it is important to bolster awareness of the service itself on a periodic basis amongst potential users.

1 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
James Warner1
Abstract: Demographic, economic and social changes over the next few decades are likely to have a significant effect on the care of the elderly. This personal view, from a United Kingdom perspective, examines some of these changes and assesses the impact they may have on the prevalence and treatment of depression in older people. Strategies for minimizing the marginalization of this group are discussed.

1 citations


References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that dissatisfaction with communication remains widespread, as does lack of compliance with medical advice, and theoretical approaches to communication and compliance should be used to direct future research.
Abstract: The literature on communication, compliance, and patient satisfaction is selectively reviewed. As in earlier reviews, it is concluded that dissatisfaction with communication remains widespread, as does lack of compliance with medical advice. Related factors include poor transmission of information from patient to doctor, low understandability of communications addressed to the patient, and low levels of recall of information by patients. There does not appear to be any evidence that provision of additional information leads to adverse reactions by patients. Theoretical approaches to communication and compliance are described, and it is concluded that these should be used to direct future research.

434 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The author delineates the implications and future uses that appropriately placed IATV links could have, such as significantly multiplying existing manpower and more evenly distributing psychiatric care without placing greater demands on manpower.
Abstract: The author describes an interactive television (IATV) system set up between Massachusetts General Hospital and a medical station in Boston. The system has proven to be feasible and acceptable to individuals and institutions in the community, providing psychiatric skills on a much wider scale, in a more accessible way, and faster than any other system. The author delineates the implications and future uses that appropriately placed IATV links could have, such as significantly multiplying existing manpower and more evenly distributing psychiatric care without placing greater demands on manpower.

146 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors describe a cable TV link between a medical school and a child health station in East Harlem and suggest that such TV links can increase mental health services to underserved inner-city children.
Abstract: The authors describe a cable TV link between a medical school and a child health station in East Harlem. Nurse associates and community health workers trained through television conferences with a child psychiatrist have the primary responsibility for patient care at the clinic. Patients and their mothers are evaluated by the child psychiatrist in TV consultations at which nurse associates, health workers, medical students, and child psychiatric fellows are present. Patients and mothers respond positively to the system, and a high percentage of the psychiatrist's treatment recommendations are accepted. The authors suggest that such TV links can increase mental health services to underserved inner-city children.

46 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Consultation services via two-way closed circuit television have proved to be effective in helping nonpsychiatric physicians to improve their knowledge of psychiatry and to treat their emotionally ill patients.
Abstract: Consultation services via two-way closed circuit television have proved to be effective in helping nonpsychiatric physicians to improve their knowledge of psychiatry and to treat their emotionally ill patients. The authors describe such a service set up between Hanover, N.H., and Claremont, N.H., a community 26 miles away. The service has aided the physicians in maintaining the majority of their referred cases in the community and has provided them with a valuable educational experience.

35 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Summary The closed circuit television tools I have discussed here will soon be available to our entire medical school as part of a Biomedical Communications Center which will incorporate and coordinate existing services and explore new methods of communication as well. I believe that closed circuit television–especially two-way television–will be a valuable tool in our medical education, service and research. It is also logical that its effectiveness will be measured in direct proportion to the amount of careful planning put into the selection of the best system, the determination of the most appropriate uses, and the encouragement of faculty and student interest and participation.

24 citations