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Intermediate microeconomics : A modern approach

01 Jan 2006-

AbstractThis best-selling text is still the most modern presentation of the subject. The Varian approach gives students tools they can use on exams, in the rest of their classes, and in their careers after graduation.

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Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In almost 600 pages of riveting detail, Ross Anderson warns us not to be seduced by the latest defensive technologies, never to underestimate human ingenuity, and always use common sense in defending valuables.
Abstract: Gigantically comprehensive and carefully researched, Security Engineering makes it clear just how difficult it is to protect information systems from corruption, eavesdropping, unauthorized use, and general malice. Better, Ross Anderson offers a lot of thoughts on how information can be made more secure (though probably not absolutely secure, at least not forever) with the help of both technologies and management strategies. His work makes fascinating reading and will no doubt inspire considerable doubt--fear is probably a better choice of words--in anyone with information to gather, protect, or make decisions about. Be aware: This is absolutely not a book solely about computers, with yet another explanation of Alice and Bob and how they exchange public keys in order to exchange messages in secret. Anderson explores, for example, the ingenious ways in which European truck drivers defeat their vehicles' speed-logging equipment. In another section, he shows how the end of the cold war brought on a decline in defenses against radio-frequency monitoring (radio frequencies can be used to determine, at a distance, what's going on in systems--bank teller machines, say), and how similar technology can be used to reverse-engineer the calculations that go on inside smart cards. In almost 600 pages of riveting detail, Anderson warns us not to be seduced by the latest defensive technologies, never to underestimate human ingenuity, and always use common sense in defending valuables. A terrific read for security professionals and general readers alike. --David Wall Topics covered: How some people go about protecting valuable things (particularly, but not exclusively, information) and how other people go about getting it anyway. Mostly, this takes the form of essays (about, for example, how the U.S. Air Force keeps its nukes out of the wrong hands) and stories (one of which tells of an art thief who defeated the latest technology by hiding in a closet). Sections deal with technologies, policies, psychology, and legal matters.

1,839 citations

01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: The conjunction of positional, directional, and translational information in a single MEC cell type may enable grid coordinates to be updated during self-motion–based navigation.
Abstract: Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) are part of an environment-independent spatial coordinate system. To determine how information about location, direction, and distance is integrated in the grid-cell network, we recorded from each principal cell layer of MEC in rats that explored two-dimensional environments. Whereas layer II was predominated by grid cells, grid cells colocalized with head-direction cells and conjunctive grid × head-direction cells in the deeper layers. All cell types were modulated by running speed. The conjunction of positional, directional, and translational information in a single MEC cell type may enable grid coordinates to be updated during self-motion–based navigation.

805 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
10 Dec 2001
TL;DR: The author puts forward a contrary view: information insecurity is at least as much due to perverse incentives as it is due to technical measures.
Abstract: According to one common view, information security comes down to technical measures. Given better access control policy models, formal proofs of cryptographic protocols, approved firewalls, better ways of detecting intrusions and malicious code, and better tools for system evaluation and assurance, the problems can be solved. The author puts forward a contrary view: information insecurity is at least as much due to perverse incentives. Many of the problems can be explained more clearly and convincingly using the language of microeconomics: network externalities, asymmetric information, moral hazard, adverse selection, liability dumping and the tragedy of the commons.

762 citations


Cites background from "Intermediate microeconomics : A mod..."

  • ...In fact, one of the main results of network economic theory is that the net present value of the customer base should equal the total costs of their switching their business to a competitor [19]....

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MonographDOI
01 May 2008

448 citations

Book
25 Oct 1999
TL;DR: This in-depth presentation of emerging technologies used to build high speed, high performance communication networks explains how the converging telephone, data, and CATV technologies are combined into high performance networks and how to plan, manage, and control these networks.
Abstract: Communication Networks--The center of the information revolution High performance networks are revolutionizing our lives in ways we cannot yet fully perceive. Meet your evolving needs with this in-depth presentation of emerging technologies used to build high speed, high performance communication networks. Authoritatively written, it explains how the converging telephone, data, and CATV technologies are combined into high performance networks, and how to plan, manage, and control these networks. An essential guide for networking professionals This book is well suited for a variety of networking needs. It enables network specialists and system administrators to make informed decisions for implementing and maintaining their companies' networks. It supplies network hardware and software developers with the tools to develop networking solutions, and it provides students in electrical engineering, computer science, operations research, and industry courses with a substantial introduction to networking principles. Features Explains the principles of network design and operation, and their implementation in state-of-the-art technologies such as Internet, high speed LANs and WANs, ISDN, ATM, BISDN, and SONET. Combines the perspectives of the communications engineer, the computer scientist and the economist to provide a system-level understanding of the core networking principles and technologies. Presents essential tools for analyzing, designing, and managing high performance networks. Provides unique coverage of economic issues including cost recovery and pricing schemes. Includes up-to-date coverage of delays, losses, admission control, routing, flow control, switching, networkplanning, pricing, and billing.

351 citations