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Journal ArticleDOI

Intermolecular interactions from a natural bond orbital, donor-acceptor viewpoint

01 Sep 1988-Chemical Reviews (American Chemical Society)-Vol. 88, Iss: 6, pp 899-926
About: This article is published in Chemical Reviews.The article was published on 1988-09-01. It has received 15091 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Non-bonding orbital & Natural bond orbital.
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TL;DR: A description of the ab initio quantum chemistry package GAMESS, which can be treated with wave functions ranging from the simplest closed‐shell case up to a general MCSCF case, permitting calculations at the necessary level of sophistication.
Abstract: A description of the ab initio quantum chemistry package GAMESS is presented. Chemical systems containing atoms through radon can be treated with wave functions ranging from the simplest closed-shell case up to a general MCSCF case, permitting calculations at the necessary level of sophistication. Emphasis is given to novel features of the program. The parallelization strategy used in the RHF, ROHF, UHF, and GVB sections of the program is described, and detailed speecup results are given. Parallel calculations can be run on ordinary workstations as well as dedicated parallel machines. © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

18,546 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The “Activation‐strain TS interaction” (ATS) model of chemical reactivity is reviewed as a conceptual framework for understanding how activation barriers of various types of reaction mechanisms arise and how they may be controlled, for example, in organic chemistry or homogeneous catalysis.
Abstract: We present the theoretical and technical foundations of the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) program with a survey of the characteristics of the code (numerical integration, density fitting for the Coulomb potential, and STO basis functions). Recent developments enhance the efficiency of ADF (e.g., parallelization, near order-N scaling, QM/MM) and its functionality (e.g., NMR chemical shifts, COSMO solvent effects, ZORA relativistic method, excitation energies, frequency-dependent (hyper)polarizabilities, atomic VDD charges). In the Applications section we discuss the physical model of the electronic structure and the chemical bond, i.e., the Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (MO) theory, and illustrate the power of the Kohn–Sham MO model in conjunction with the ADF-typical fragment approach to quantitatively understand and predict chemical phenomena. We review the “Activation-strain TS interaction” (ATS) model of chemical reactivity as a conceptual framework for understanding how activation barriers of various types of (competing) reaction mechanisms arise and how they may be controlled, for example, in organic chemistry or homogeneous catalysis. Finally, we include a brief discussion of exemplary applications in the field of biochemistry (structure and bonding of DNA) and of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to indicate how this development further reinforces the ADF tools for the analysis of chemical phenomena. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Comput Chem 22: 931–967, 2001

8,490 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a meta-analysis of the chiral stationary phase transition of Na6(CO3)(SO4)2, a major component of the response of the immune system to Na2CO3.
Abstract: Ju Mei,†,‡,∥ Nelson L. C. Leung,†,‡,∥ Ryan T. K. Kwok,†,‡ Jacky W. Y. Lam,†,‡ and Ben Zhong Tang*,†,‡,§ †HKUST-Shenzhen Research Institute, Hi-Tech Park, Nanshan, Shenzhen 518057, China ‡Department of Chemistry, HKUST Jockey Club Institute for Advanced Study, Institute of Molecular Functional Materials, Division of Biomedical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience, Division of Life Science, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China Guangdong Innovative Research Team, SCUT-HKUST Joint Research Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China

5,658 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The hydrogen bond is the most important of all directional intermolecular interactions, operative in determining molecular conformation, molecular aggregation, and the function of a vast number of chemical systems ranging from inorganic to biological.
Abstract: The hydrogen bond is the most important of all directional intermolecular interactions. It is operative in determining molecular conformation, molecular aggregation, and the function of a vast number of chemical systems ranging from inorganic to biological. Research into hydrogen bonds experienced a stagnant period in the 1980s, but re-opened around 1990, and has been in rapid development since then. In terms of modern concepts, the hydrogen bond is understood as a very broad phenomenon, and it is accepted that there are open borders to other effects. There are dozens of different types of X-H.A hydrogen bonds that occur commonly in the condensed phases, and in addition there are innumerable less common ones. Dissociation energies span more than two orders of magnitude (about 0.2-40 kcal mol(-1)). Within this range, the nature of the interaction is not constant, but its electrostatic, covalent, and dispersion contributions vary in their relative weights. The hydrogen bond has broad transition regions that merge continuously with the covalent bond, the van der Waals interaction, the ionic interaction, and also the cation-pi interaction. All hydrogen bonds can be considered as incipient proton transfer reactions, and for strong hydrogen bonds, this reaction can be in a very advanced state. In this review, a coherent survey is given on all these matters.

5,153 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This chapter discusses the development of DFT as a tool for Calculating Atomic andMolecular Properties and its applications, as well as some of the fundamental and Computational aspects.
Abstract: I. Introduction: Conceptual vs Fundamental andComputational Aspects of DFT1793II. Fundamental and Computational Aspects of DFT 1795A. The Basics of DFT: The Hohenberg−KohnTheorems1795B. DFT as a Tool for Calculating Atomic andMolecular Properties: The Kohn−ShamEquations1796C. Electronic Chemical Potential andElectronegativity: Bridging Computational andConceptual DFT1797III. DFT-Based Concepts and Principles 1798A. General Scheme: Nalewajski’s ChargeSensitivity Analysis1798B. Concepts and Their Calculation 18001. Electronegativity and the ElectronicChemical Potential18002. Global Hardness and Softness 18023. The Electronic Fukui Function, LocalSoftness, and Softness Kernel18074. Local Hardness and Hardness Kernel 18135. The Molecular Shape FunctionsSimilarity 18146. The Nuclear Fukui Function and ItsDerivatives18167. Spin-Polarized Generalizations 18198. Solvent Effects 18209. Time Evolution of Reactivity Indices 1821C. Principles 18221. Sanderson’s Electronegativity EqualizationPrinciple18222. Pearson’s Hard and Soft Acids andBases Principle18253. The Maximum Hardness Principle 1829IV. Applications 1833A. Atoms and Functional Groups 1833B. Molecular Properties 18381. Dipole Moment, Hardness, Softness, andRelated Properties18382. Conformation 18403. Aromaticity 1840C. Reactivity 18421. Introduction 18422. Comparison of Intramolecular ReactivitySequences18443. Comparison of Intermolecular ReactivitySequences18494. Excited States 1857D. Clusters and Catalysis 1858V. Conclusions 1860VI. Glossary of Most Important Symbols andAcronyms1860VII. Acknowledgments 1861VIII. Note Added in Proof 1862IX. References 1865

3,890 citations

References
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TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the properties of water molecules and their relationship with common soluble proteins, such as membrane proteins and membrane membrane proteins, as well as the effect of temperature on their properties.
Abstract: The Solubility of Hydrocarbons in Water. Solubility of Amphiphiles in Water and Organic Solvents. The Effect of Temperature: Anomalous Entropy and Heat Capacity. The Structure of Water. Micelles: Introduction. Thermodynamics of Micelle Formation. Micelle Size and Shape. Mixed Micelles. Monolayers. Biological Lipids. Motility and Order. Proteins: Hydrophobic Side Chains and Conformational Change. The Association of Hydrocarbons and Amphiphiles with Common Soluble Proteins. Serum Lipoproteins. Biological Membranes. Membrane Proteins. Author and Subject Indices.

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