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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/S00520-021-06077-0

Internet and social media use in cancer patients: association with distress and perceived benefits and limitations.

02 Mar 2021-Supportive Care in Cancer (Springer Berlin Heidelberg)-Vol. 29, Iss: 9, pp 1-9
Abstract: Cancer patients may turn to social media (SM) to cope with distress. We investigated associations between distress and internet/SM use for cancer information/support. Adult patients at a Canadian cancer centre completed a cross-sectional survey on sociodemographics, health status, use of cancer online resources and distress (EQ5D-5L). Statistical models adjusted for relevant variables. Of 376 participants, median age was 52 years, time since diagnosis was 1.63 years, 272 (74%) had post-secondary education and 192 (51%) were female. For cancer information/support, 276 (73%) used internet and 147 (39%) SM. Dose response relationships were observed between distress and cancer-related internet (p = 0.02), and SM use (p 30 min daily (OR = 3.4; 95% CI: 2.1–5.7), and were distressed (OR = 1.67, 95% CI: 1.0–2.7). SM benefits were to learn about cancer (93; 25%), distract from cancer (85; 23%) and connect with survivors (81; 22%). SM limitations were privacy (161; 43%), quality (90; 24%) and personal applicability (85; 23%). Females used SM more to connect with survivors than males (p = 0.001). Greater internet confidence, higher education and being female were associated with cancer-related internet/SM use. Distressed cancer patients were also more likely to turn to SM. Privacy concerns may limit SM use for coping. Future research should determine how to optimize SM in caring for and connecting with patients and reduce cancer-related distress.

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Topics: Distress (52%)
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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.CANRAD.2021.09.011
Abstract: Adjuvant radiotherapy is one of the major anticancer treatments in early breast cancer patients. Acute and late radio-induced effects may occur during or after breast cancer radiotherapy, and their medical management is a major issue for radiation oncologists. Here, the present review of literature embraces complementary non-pharmacological interventions, which could be combined to adjuvant radiotherapy in order to improve patients care.

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Topics: Breast cancer (65%), Radiation therapy (60%)

Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1002/PBC.29405
Abstract: Multiple factors can facilitate or impede the fulfillment of communication functions in pediatric cancer. In this systematic review, we evaluated 109 studies from the preceding 20 years that presented qualitative or quantitative evidence of barriers or facilitators to communication in pediatric cancer. Using a multilevel framework developed in our prior study, we then analyzed and categorized the levels of barriers and facilitators identified in included studies. The vast majority of studies focused on individual-level barriers, rather than team, organization/system, collaborating hospital, community, or policy-level barriers. Future studies should explore the full range of factors that affect communication.

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Topics: Pediatric cancer (62%), Palliative care (50%)

Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1089/JAYAO.2021.0122
Abstract: Adolescents with cancer (AWC) in pediatrics may not have adequate opportunities for peer support. This mixed methods study aimed to characterize peer support needs of AWC during or shortly after treatment. Ten AWC with median age 16.5 (range 14-18) years completed a survey and semistructured interview. Three themes were apparent: cancer journey difficulties, current support system, and peer support perspectives. Participants felt incompletely understood by existing supports, lacked connection with other AWC, and craved experiential information. Peer support interventions should be flexible, facilitate various interactions, and include social media. The next step is to implement and evaluate an intervention.

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Topics: Peer support (64%)

Open accessProceedings ArticleDOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-89941-7_9
24 Nov 2021-
Abstract: The objective of the study was to determine the satisfaction with respect to the information received about health care and the prevention of medical fake news on Facebook during the COVID-19 pandemic in Peru, identifying differences with respect to gender and age. A cross-sectional investigation was carried out with 290 people who previously participated for 5 months on a voluntary basis in a Facebook group managed by health professionals. Data collection and analysis was performed using an online questionnaire and the SPSS program, respectively. The Chi square test was applied. A majority proportion of people satisfied with the information received was evidenced, with an average score of 4.14 on a scale of 1 to 5. Young people and women presented higher satisfaction values. It was concluded that there were high levels of satisfaction with the information received on health care and the prevention of medical fake news on Facebook during the COVID-19 pandemic in Peru. The promotion of netiquette or rules of cordiality on Facebook is an aspect that needs to be improved.

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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1111/JOCD.14272
Abstract: Background Acne vulgaris (AV) may affect external appearance and significantly deteriorate the quality of life of patients. Therefore, patients make various inquiries about their disease and seek treatment options. Aims To investigate the social media usage habits of patients with AV concerning their diseases, and their recommendations for dermatologists related to social media use. Methods A total of 1609 patients with AV completed the survey prepared by the authors and the Cardiff Acne Disability Index questionnaire. The Food and Drug Administration severity scores and clinical information of the patients were noted by their physicians. Results Of the 1,489 patients who stated that they used social media, 46.31% regularly and 28.77% sometimes referred to these sources to make inquiries about AV. Social media usage for AV was statistically significantly higher in women, participants with short term and severe disease, those with a moderate income level, and those using topical treatment and cosmetics. They mostly used Google (67%), Instagram (54%), and YouTube (49%). While 76% of the participants stated that they did not share what they saw on the Internet with their doctor. Of the respondents, 18.5% were trying to contact their dermatologists through the Internet, and 69.73% would prefer experts such as dermatologists to post-AV-related content. Conclusions Our study shows that patients frequently resort to social media to seek information about AV. In the changing digital world order, it is observed that there is a need for dermatologists to use social media more actively to share accurate information about AV.

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Topics: Social media (51%)
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37 results found


Open accessBook
01 Jan 1974-
Abstract: Here is a monumental work that continues in the tradition pioneered by co-author Richard Lazarus in his classic book Psychological Stress and the Coping Process. Dr. Lazarus and his collaborator, Dr. Susan Folkman, present here a detailed theory of psychological stress, building on the concepts of cognitive appraisal and coping which have become major themes of theory and investigation. As an integrative theoretical analysis, this volume pulls together two decades of research and thought on issues in behavioral medicine, emotion, stress management, treatment, and life span development. A selective review of the most pertinent literature is included in each chapter. The total reference listing for the book extends to 60 pages. This work is necessarily multidisciplinary, reflecting the many dimensions of stress-related problems and their situation within a complex social context. While the emphasis is on psychological aspects of stress, the book is oriented towards professionals in various disciplines, as well as advanced students and educated laypersons. The intended audience ranges from psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, nurses, and social workers to sociologists, anthropologists, medical researchers, and physiologists.

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Topics: Stress management (58%), Appraisal theory (56%), Coping (psychology) (56%) ... read more

35,437 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.IJSU.2014.07.013
Erik von Elm1, Douglas G. Altman2, Matthias Egger3, Matthias Egger4  +3 moreInstitutions (7)
16 Oct 2007-PLOS Medicine
Abstract: Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the Web sites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

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12,675 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.BUSHOR.2009.09.003
Andreas M. Kaplan1, Michael Haenlein1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 2010-Business Horizons
Abstract: The concept of Social Media is top of the agenda for many business executives today. Decision makers, as well as consultants, try to identify ways in which firms can make profitable use of applications such as Wikipedia, YouTube, Facebook, Second Life, and Twitter. Yet despite this interest, there seems to be very limited understanding of what the term ''Social Media'' exactly means; this article intends to provide some clarification. We begin by describing the concept of Social Media, and discuss how it differs from related concepts such as Web 2.0 and User Generated Content. Based on this definition, we then provide a classification of Social Media which groups applications currently subsumed under the generalized term into more specific categories by characteristic: collaborative projects, blogs, content communities, social networking sites, virtual game worlds, and virtual social worlds. Finally, we present 10 pieces of advice for companies which decide to utilize Social Media.

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Topics: Social media (68%), Social media optimization (67%), User-generated content (64%) ... read more

12,452 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.2471/BLT.07.045120
E von Elm1, Douglas G. Altman2, Matthias Egger1, Matthias Egger3  +3 moreInstitutions (6)
Abstract: Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study’s generalizability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies. We convened a two-day workshop, in September 2004, with methodologists, researchers and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the web sites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

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7,323 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(07)61602-X
Erik von Elm1, Douglas G. Altman2, Matthias Egger1, Matthias Egger3  +3 moreInstitutions (6)
20 Oct 2007-The Lancet
Abstract: Summary Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September, 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed explanation and elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the websites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine , and Epidemiology . We hope that the STROBE statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

... read more

6,778 Citations