scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Investigations of the track gage stability of wheel sets with block-braked solid wheels

01 Nov 1975-Vol. 99, Iss: 11
TL;DR: In this paper, the influence of the shape of the wheel centers of solid wheels on their thermal distortion and permanent set in axial direction during or after heating of a wheel tire by the brake blocks was investigated.
Abstract: The investigations described were carried out to determine the influence of the shape of the wheel centers of solid wheels on their thermal distortion and permanent set in axial direction during or after heating of the wheel tire by the brake blocks Analyses by computation using the method of finite elements served the purpose of finding wheel center shapes featuring a minimum thermal distortion Subsequent braking tests on prototype wheels on the test stand proved that a small thermal distortion results also in small permanent set
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1994
TL;DR: In this article, a two-level fractional factorial design method is used to quantify the influences of rim thickness, disc thickness and hub-rim offset on thermal and mechanical stress, on axial rim displacement, and on wheel mass.
Abstract: The performance of a ‘low-stress wheel’ exposed to vertical and lateral contact forces and to thermal braking loads is investigated. Based on finite element calculations, a two-level fractional factorial design method is used to quantify the influences of rim thickness, disc thickness and hub-rim offset on thermal and mechanical stressses, on axial rim displacement, and on wheel mass. A number of approximating linear empirical formulas have been obtained. They offer a powerful tool in designing and optimizing railway wheels. The most effective measure to reduce thermal and mechanical stresses is found to be a hub-rim offset but the penalty is a thermoelastic axial rim displacement during heating. This displacement can be minimized by using as large an offset as possible within geometrical limits. In contrast to the standard type of wheel, no residual deformations and large stresses are induced in the offset wheel after heavy block braking. Full-scale dynamometer brake tests performed on a new prototype wh...

9 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1994
TL;DR: In this article, a two-level fractional factorial design method is used to quantify the influences of rim thickness, disc thickness and hub-rim offset on thermal and mechanical stress, on axial rim displacement, and on wheel mass.
Abstract: The performance of a ‘low-stress wheel’ exposed to vertical and lateral contact forces and to thermal braking loads is investigated. Based on finite element calculations, a two-level fractional factorial design method is used to quantify the influences of rim thickness, disc thickness and hub-rim offset on thermal and mechanical stressses, on axial rim displacement, and on wheel mass. A number of approximating linear empirical formulas have been obtained. They offer a powerful tool in designing and optimizing railway wheels. The most effective measure to reduce thermal and mechanical stresses is found to be a hub-rim offset but the penalty is a thermoelastic axial rim displacement during heating. This displacement can be minimized by using as large an offset as possible within geometrical limits. In contrast to the standard type of wheel, no residual deformations and large stresses are induced in the offset wheel after heavy block braking. Full-scale dynamometer brake tests performed on a new prototype wh...

9 citations