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Journal ArticleDOI

Iranian Language Reform in the Twentieth Century:Did the First Farhangestān (1935-40) Succeed?

01 Jul 2010-Journal of Persianate Studies (Brill)-Vol. 3, Iss: 1, pp 78-103
TL;DR: In the period 1935-1940, the Iranian Language Academy (Farhangestān) proposed over 1,600 indigenous terms to replace words of Arabic or European origin this article.
Abstract: In the period 1935-1940, the Iranian Language Academy (Farhangestān) proposed over 1,600 indigenous terms to replace words of Arabic or European origin. Seventy years later, an assessment of the effects or “success” of this activity may be attempted. The Farhangestān’s success cannot be measured easily, by counting the successful words. A study of it requires a strict definition of the term “success” and a detailed analysis of the origin, semantics, usage, stylistics, etc. of each word. The analysis proposed here, using sixty terms, yields a scale of increasing success along which the coined terms may be arranged. The article aims to show that any exact numbers indicating the Farhangestān’s word-replacing success are of limited value; and that it is more interesting to ask how the new terms have been established and how they have systematically changed, and often enriched, the vocabulary of Persian.
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Journal ArticleDOI
05 Sep 2022-Annali
TL;DR: In this paper , the first attempts to reform the Arabic-Persian alphabet were described by Âkhundzâde and Malkom Khân, and passages on the subject from two significant works by Tâlebof were translated into English.
Abstract: Since the second half of the 19th century, proposals for modification of the Arabic-Persian alphabet have been the focus of debates among intellectuals and writers. Discussions have also extended to the more literary sphere, where the subject was addressed in works such as Tâlebof’s Ketâb-e Ahmad and Masâlekoʾl-mohsenin. The present article illustrates the first attempts to reform the script, by Âkhundzâde and Malkom Khân, then examines and translates passages on the subject from two significant works by Tâlebof.